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Download The Road to Oxiana eBook

by Robert Byron,Paul Fussell,Rory Stewart

Download The Road to Oxiana eBook
ISBN:
0195325605
Author:
Robert Byron,Paul Fussell,Rory Stewart
Category:
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Language:
English
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; Reissue edition (May 18, 2007)
Pages:
320 pages
EPUB book:
1409 kb
FB2 book:
1589 kb
DJVU:
1533 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
970


In 1933 the delightfully eccentric Robert Byron set out on a journey through the Middle East via Beirut and Jerusalem.

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. In 1933 the delightfully eccentric Robert Byron set out on a journey through the Middle East via Beirut and Jerusalem. Robert Byron was born in England in 1905 into a family distantly related to Lord Byron.

When Paul Fussell published his own book Abroad, in 1982, he wrote that The Road to Oxiana is to the travel .

When Paul Fussell published his own book Abroad, in 1982, he wrote that The Road to Oxiana is to the travel book what "Ulysses is to the novel between the wars, and what The Waste Land is to poetry. Now this long-overdue reprint will introduce it to a whole new generation of readers.

Robert Byron Preface by Rory Stewart and Introduction by Paul Fussell

Robert Byron Preface by Rory Stewart and Introduction by Paul Fussell. A beloved travel classic gives a new generation a glimpse of a lost Arab world. Robert Byron Preface by Rory Stewart and Introduction by Paul Fussell. When Paul Fussell published his own book Abroad, in 1982, he wrote that The Road to Oxiana is to the travel book what "Ulysses is to the novel between the wars, and what The Waste Land is to poetry.

The Road to Oxiana is a travelogue by Robert Byron, first published in 1937. It is considered by many modern travel writers to be the first example of great travel writing.

According to Robert Byron’s Oxford contemporary Evelyn Waugh – never .

According to Robert Byron’s Oxford contemporary Evelyn Waugh – never the most reliable witness – the future author of The Road to Oxiana used to delight in shouting Down with abroad. Today, widely considered to be Byron’s masterpiece, The Road to Oxiana stands as perhaps the greatest travel book of the 20th century. The American critic Paul Fussell, writing in Abroad, his important 1982 study of interwar literary travelling, has judged that what Ulysses is to the novel between the wars, and what The Waste Land is to poetry, The Road to Oxiana is to the travel book.

The Road to Oxiana (Paperback). Certainly the wittiest book, and perhaps the wisest, to have been written in English about Iran. Robert Byron (author), Colin Thubron (author of introduction). Robert Byron (1905-41) was born in 1905, and educated at Eton and Merton College, Oxford. related to Lord Byron.

When Paul Fussell "rediscovered" The Road to Oxiana in his recent book Abroad, he whetted the appetite of a. .This book is considered by many travel writers to be the first great piece of travel writing.

When Paul Fussell "rediscovered" The Road to Oxiana in his recent book Abroad, he whetted the appetite of a whole new generation of readers. In his new introduction, written especially for this volume, Fussell writes: "Reading the book is like stumbling into a modern museum of literary kinds presided over by a benign if eccentric curator. Bryon was a great advocate of ancient architecture and worked feverishly during his short life to try and insure that as much of it was preserved as possible. He gets rather rapturous when describing a column, or an arch or a minaret.

Robert Byron (26 February 1905 – 24 February 1941) was a British travel writer, best known for his travelogue The Road to Oxiana. He was also a noted writer, art critic and historian. Byron was born in 1905, and educated at Eton and Merton College, Oxford, from which he was expelled for his hedonistic and rebellious manner. At Oxford he was part of the Hypocrites' Club.

When Paul Fussell published his own book Abroad, in 1982, he wrote that The Road to Oxiana is to the travel book what Ulysses is to the novel between the wars, and what The Waste Land is to poetry.

In 1933, the delightfully eccentric travel writer Robert Byron set out on a journey through the Middle East via Beirut, Jerusalem, Baghdad and Teheran to Oxiana, near the border between Afghanistan and the Soviet Union. Throughout, he kept a thoroughly captivating record of his encounters, discoveries, and frequent misadventures. His story would become a best-selling travel book throughout the English-speaking world, until the acclaim died down and it was gradually forgotten. When Paul Fussell published his own book Abroad, in 1982, he wrote that The Road to Oxiana is to the travel book what "Ulysses is to the novel between the wars, and what The Waste Land is to poetry." His statements revived the public's interest in the book, and for the first time, it was widely available in American bookstores. Now this long-overdue reprint will introduce it to a whole new generation of readers. This edition features a new introduction by Rory Stewart, best known for his book The Places In Between, about his extensive travels in Afghanistan. Today, in addition to its entertainment value, The Road to Oxiana also serves as a rare account of the architectural treasures of a region now inaccessible to most Western travelers, and a nostalgic look back at a more innocent time.
  • Uttegirazu
Fascinating and entertaining account of Afghanistan and Iran before WW2. So much discussed and wryly observed is still current. Good travelogue, good political history, excellent architectural tour, dry British humour.
  • Androlhala
The book forces one to keep an I Pad at hand to more fully appreciate the places, persons, historical events, and architectural wonders to which Byron alludes. I thought I was well educated until I encountered this incredible display of erudition. The difficulties he confronts (washed out roads, unreliable vehicles, incompetent guides, self serving officials, etc.) makes me realize what a spoiled, taffy-assed bunch we have become when it comes to travel.
  • Skrimpak
This wonderful account by Robert Byron of his travels through Persia and Afghanistan is spare when it should be spare: "Lifar came to dinner. Bertie mentioned that all whales have syphilis" (a complete paragraph from page 19) and effusive when it should be effusive: "Here the green resolved, not into ordinary grass, but into wild corn, barley, and oats, which accounted for that vivid fire, as of a life within the green. And among these myriad bearded alleys lived a population of flowers, buttercup and poppies, pale purple irises and dark purple campanulas, and countless others..." (from a paragraph on page 200). Never mind the country he was traveling through, I just love his prose. They are never trite, never cliché. It's almost as if when a hackneyed phrase would have done, he sought hard for something bright, fresh, new.

But don't never mind the country he explored (stony deserts, mountains, steppes, caves, rivers) or the people he encountered (generous peasants, officious police, frightened guides, accommodative local governors, obstreperous archaeologists, clueless tourists, declamatory larger than life ambassadors whose words are accompanied by appropriate dynamic markings...) - he makes them all fascinating. His dry British wit pervades much of the manuscript. And, oh, how he waxes eloquent on architecture, a subject which in the abstract seems excruciatingly boring to me, but is never so within this book, as he documents the features of mosques and mausoleums and ruined cities.

In the 30's when Byron made this trip Iran was Persia and under the autocratic rule of the Shah (AKA Marjoribanks) instead of being strangled by fundamentalist clerics. Afghanistan was a poor underdeveloped country under (what in Afghanistan passes for) the benign rule of its royal family. Now that country has been destroyed by 30 years of internal strife, war with the Soviet Union, Taliban depravity, war with the US, and more internal strife. Whatever the consequences for the peoples of these countries, the time is long gone when an English speaking traveler could make their way from Persepolis to the feet of the Hindu Kush or the Pamirs. How sad. But at least one can read Byron's book. I'd also recommend Dervla Murphy's Full Tilt: Ireland to India with a Bicycle. It's not as cerebral , but just imagine the idea of anyone, let alone (gasp) a woman, bicycling all the way from Eastern Europe, through Azerbaijan, Iran, Afghanistan, and Pakistan into India. That was in 1963. Wow!
  • Majin
Extraordinary story by man with deep knowledge of and appreciation for architectural history.....but you don't need to share that interest to enjoy the literate description of a world long since evaporated, of travelers who actually carried "letters of introduction".....in part absurd, in part wildly entertaining......the ride, by car boat rail truck camel foot ....whatever... is worth it for the company.....
  • energy breath
Don't buy this edition. This is a memoir of Robert Byron's travels in the mid-1930's which concentrates on Iran and Afghanistan. The Penguin 1992 edition has four easy to read maps which make it possible to see where the places are that he describes. This edition has many maps, but they are impossible to read, even with a magnifying glass. The only thing one can see on these maps is the line that tracks where he went; the names of all the places along the line are illegible. Even the names of the starting point and the end point of each map are illegible. I love to be able to see on a map where the places are that an author is talking about, so this edition is a huge disappointment. I don't know whether or not the other editions of this book have legible maps. The cover of the Penguin 1992 edition has a drawing of a Persian mosque done in turquoise and gray, and at the bottom of the cover is an orange bar that says "Penguin Travel Library".
  • roternow
Byron's travelogue through the Near East early in the twentieth century provides the serious scholar with a flawless insight of the region's cultures, art, architecture, religions, commerce, and politics. Byron's book is considered, by those who are tasked with serious and sensitive work in that region, as being a seminal work. His unique education coupled with his extraordinary capability as an observer has provided for a remarkable view of the Near East in a manner literally unequaled by the majority of Western scholars over the past almost one hundred years. As a person who lived and worked in Iran, I found his book indispensible.
  • Xangeo
A thoroughly engaging if at times eccentric 1933 trek into Central Asia by way of the Middle East. Author Robert Byron's voice is sure. And the part of the world he treks to (Afghanistan into the former USSR) is not easy to get to, even today. If you like travel tales, this is a good one.
Please look past the one-star review of the previous reviewer...check out other editions of the book and you'll get a truer picture. Byron was notoriously opinionated but that is what makes the book. If you have delicate sensibilities, you may want to skip this. Byron wasn't comprehensive so you are reading literature here, not a complete guidebook. His strengths were a love of architecture and hatred of hypocrisy.

This edition has the added bonus of a Preface by Rory Stewart, recent author of THE PLACES IN BETWEEN and THE PRINCE OF THE MARSHES, about Afghanistan and Iraq respectively.

My only quibble with this edition is with the photographs. They are printed on the same paper stock as the text. The publisher can do better than this with a classic.