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by Evelyn Waugh

Download Labels eBook
ISBN:
0413639509
Author:
Evelyn Waugh
Category:
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Language:
English
Publisher:
Methuen Publishing Ltd (October 28, 1991)
Pages:
208 pages
EPUB book:
1439 kb
FB2 book:
1608 kb
DJVU:
1942 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
572


His most famous works include the early satires Decline and Fall (1928) and A Handful of Dust (1934), the novel Brideshead Revisited (1945), and the Second World War trilogy Sword of Honour (1952–61).

Brideshead Revisited by. Evelyn Waugh. Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Evelyn Waugh’s most popular book is Brideshead Revisited. Brideshead Revisited by.

Evelyn Waugh was born in Hampstead in 1903, second son of Arthur Waugh, publisher and literary critic, and . Published in 1930, Labels is Evelyn’s Waugh first travel book, which was followed in 1931 by the more well known Remote People.

Evelyn Waugh was born in Hampstead in 1903, second son of Arthur Waugh, publisher and literary critic, and brother of Alec Waugh, the popular novelist. He was educated at Lancing and Hertford College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. In both location and style, this is a more tentative – but certainly not a less enjoyable – book. Called Labels because all the places visited on his trip were fully labelled in travellers minds, it is obvious that Waugh is not off the beaten track.

Evelyn Waugh Evelyn Waugh.

Lord Copper, newspaper magnate and proprietor of the Daily Beast, has always prided himself on his intuitive flair for spotting ace reporters. That is not to say he has not made the odd blunder, however, and may in a moment of weakness make another. Upper-class scoundrel Basil Seal, mad, bad, and dangerous to know, creates havoc wherever he goes, much to the despair of the three women in his life-his sister, his mother, and his mistress. When Neville Chamberlain declares war on Germany, it seems the perfect opportunity for more action and adventure.

Looking for books by Evelyn Waugh? See all books authored by Evelyn Waugh, including Brideshead Revisited: The Sacred and Profane Memories of Captain Charles Ryder, and A Handful of Dust, and more on ThriftBooks. Although he s best known for Brideshead Revisited, his melancholy look back at the twilight of the English aristocracy, it's Evelyn Waugh s genius for satire that truly distinguishes him. His acid wit and relentless drive to uncover hypocrisy and pretension make him a writer whose sweet way with words is equally matched by his powerful, almost bitter satires of modern culture. Series By Evelyn Waugh. Books By Evelyn Waugh.

118. Настройки: Arial Century Courier Georgia Tahoma Verdana Times New Roman. А. 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26.

Lord Copper, newspaper magnate and proprietor of the Daily Beast, has always prided himself on his intuitive flair for spotting ace reporters

After seven years of marriage, the beautiful Lady Brenda Last has grown bored with life at Hetton Abbey, the Gothic mansion that is the pride and joy of her husband, Tony. Lord Copper, newspaper magnate and proprietor of the Daily Beast, has always prided himself on his intuitive flair for spotting ace reporters.

Evelyn Waugh letters shed light on his abandoned first novel. In correspondence going to auction this week, the writer describes how he burned a manuscript titled The Temple at Thatch. Published: 2 Dec 2019. Evelyn Waugh letters shed light on his abandoned first novel. From Martin Amis to Robert Robinson, our expert recommends the writers who provide a funny respite from real life. Published: 4 May 2019. Book clinic: which books will make me laugh out loud? February 2019.

Evelyn Waugh, English writer regarded by many as the most brilliant satirical novelist of his day. Waugh was educated at Lancing College, Sussex, and at Hertford College, Oxford

Evelyn Waugh, English writer regarded by many as the most brilliant satirical novelist of his day. Waugh was educated at Lancing College, Sussex, and at Hertford College, Oxford. Waugh also wrote travel books; lives of Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1928), Edmund Campion (1935), and Ronald Knox (1959); and the first part of an autobiography, A Little Learning (1964).

Последние твиты от Evelyn Waugh Society (ynWaughSoc). A literary society devoted to the life and works of Arthur Evelyn St. John Waugh (1903–1966). 0 ответов 0 ретвитов 0 отметок Нравится.

The third of Evelyn Waugh's early travel books describes a pleasure cruise undertaken in 1929 around the Mediterranean - taking in, among other places, Naples, Port Said, Cairo, Crete, Constantinople, Athens, Corfu, Dubrovnik and Barcelona.
  • Hulis
This delightful book describes an extended tour around the mainly Mediterranean Europe of the inter-World War years - it is in fact describing Waugh's own heavily disguised honeymoon. The resulting book gained much praise and interest...
"the new book that interests me most this week is Labels ... less for any outstanding merits it may possess than from the fact that I wrote it myself" as the author himself wrote in review!

Full of that marvelous inherited family wit, the book contains several favorite sentences, often quoted or at least partly remembered by fans of this family's writing. A gushing encounter at a tony cocktail party:
"..I love your books so much I never travel without them.. I keep them in a row by my bed."
"..by any chance you are not confusing me with my brother, Alec? He has written many more books than I.'
"Yes, of course. What's your name then?"
"Evelyn."
"But... they said you wrote!"
"Well, yes I do a little. You see I couldn't get any other sort of job".
Evelyn adds ruefully that he wondered if she would add Labels to the row by her bed.

Another gem, perhaps the most famous paragraph written in the entire genre of travel...
"I do not think I shall ever forget the sight of Etna at sunset; the mountains almost invisible in a blur of pastel grey, glowing on the top ... the whole horizon behind radiant with pink light, fading gently into a grey pastel sky." Then the final sentence: "Nothing I have seen in Art or Nature was quite so revolting."

A wonderful romping read.
  • snowball
Waugh writes (rather) short vignettes about different cities on a tour of Mediterranean countries in 1930. It's a wonderful window on a long lost world of traveling -- when people traveled at a snail's pace and spoke several languages (even if just to order a drink). Waugh's tales paint a picture of a lost world, Europe between the wars, that was a hodgepodge of cultures, languages, and customs that every educated person would have been familiar with. One feels a sweet longing for those days of traveling to be in a country rather than just passing through it as we do today. It is particularly interesting to read his tales from Egypt and Malta, places that seem to be the epitome of the exotic for the ex-pat set.
  • Alsanadar
Published in 1930, “Labels” is Evelyn’s Waugh first travel book, which was followed in 1931 by the more well known “Remote People.” In both location and style, this is a more tentative – but certainly not a less enjoyable – book. Called “Labels” because all the places visited on his trip were fully labelled in travellers minds, it is obvious that Waugh is not off the beaten track. Indeed, he travels by train or on cruise ships, meets groups of tourists and often joins them on excursions. During this book he begins with a vague intention of visiting Russia, but never gets there. Instead he travels around Europe, the Middle East and North Africa; going to Paris, Monte Carlo, Cairo, Cyprus, Malta and Barcelona, among other places.

These travels take place in 1929 and so this book is fascinating as an account of a long vanished world as much as being a record of Waugh’s trips. He is a young man here, having published only one biography and one novel. At this time, his brother Alec was a far more successful writer than he was – indeed, he makes light of being mistaken for his brother by a woman he meets, but it surely rankled. His sharp humour is very much in evidence in this wonderful volume and he is full of sly observations. In Cairo, for instance, he is slightly overwhelmed by staying in a hotel so close to the pyramids. It is, he observes, “like having the Prince of Wales at the next table in a restaurant; one kept pretending not to notice, while all the time glancing furtively to see if they were still there.”

During this book, Waugh has a warm and chatty style; he is charming, charmed and open to new experiences. If you have enjoyed Waugh’s more famous novels, then this will show you another side to the author as he just started out on his travels. Like all his books, it is a delight.