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Download To Timbuktu: A Journey Down the Niger eBook

by Mark Jenkins

Download To Timbuktu: A Journey Down the Niger eBook
ISBN:
070906151X
Author:
Mark Jenkins
Category:
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Language:
English
Publisher:
Robert Hale; 1st edition (1998)
Pages:
222 pages
EPUB book:
1746 kb
FB2 book:
1793 kb
DJVU:
1615 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
201


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MARK JENKINS is global correspondent for Rodale magazines and a former monthly columnist for Outside magazine. I liked reading about the many explorers who attempted the Niger and to reach Timbuktu, though I had read much of that before and in greater detail. Besides writing the critically acclaimed books A Man's Life, The Hard Way, and Off the Map, Jenkins is featured in Best American Travel Writing and has written for Men's Health, Backpacker, Time, the Atlantic Monthly, National Geographic, and other media. I guess what I liked most was his writing style; his put-you-there descriptiveness of what he saw and experienced.

Items related to To Timbuktu: A Journey Down the Niger. Mark Jenkins To Timbuktu: A Journey Down the Niger. ISBN 13: 9780709061519. To Timbuktu: A Journey Down the Niger. In To Timbuktu, he sets out with three friends to attempt their first descent of the Niger River, hoping to reach the legendary city of Timbuktu. Along the way they are attacked by killer bees, charged by hippos, and stalked by crocodiles.

by Mark Jenkins First published June 1997. To Timbuktu (Paperback). Published September 13th 1998 by Harper Perennial. To Timbuktu: A Journey Down the Niger (Paperback). Paperback, 224 pages. Author(s): Mark Jenkins.

To Timbuktu has all that a travel book should. com User, December 23, 2000. To Timbuktu combines the three things necessary for a great travel book: adventure, history, and humor.

Some intrepid young men become the first outsiders to boat down the fearsome upper reaches of the .

Some intrepid young men become the first outsiders to boat down the fearsome upper reaches of the Niger River.

Author : Mark Jenkins. Publisher : Robert Hale 1998. Magazine: To Timbuktu: A Journey Down the Niger. ISBN-10 : 070906151X. ISBN-13 : 9780709061519. Save as template? Title.

To Timbuktu : A Journey Down the Niger. By (author) Mark Jenkins.

Written by. Mark Jenkins. Manufacturer: William Morrow Release date: 1 June 1997 ISBN-10 : 0688115853 ISBN-13: 9780688115852.

For nearly eight years as the monthly columnist for Outside magazine, and in his award-winning books, Mark Jenkins has held fans spellbound with his riveting accounts of expeditions to remote parts of the globe. In To Timbuktu, he sets out with three friends to attempt their first descent of the Niger River, hoping to reach the legendary city of Timbuktu. Along the way they are attacked by killer bees, charged by hippos, and stalked by crocodiles. They stumble upon a group of completely blind men living alone in the bush and dance with a hundred naked women. That Jenkins finally reaches his goal—riding alone across the Sahara on a motorcycle—stands in sharp contrast to what befell earlier explorers who tried to find Timbuktu and whose fates the author interweaves with the narrative of his own journey.

A rich combination of cultural exploration, history, and gripping adventure, this beautifully repackaged edition of To Timbuktu is a journey not to be missed.


  • Braendo
A fascinating book by a truly skillful writer. I admit to being put off a bit put by the fact that the author and his childhood friend (both uncontrollable danger junkies) took off on their insanely hazardous journey (to paddle the largely uncharted Niger River hundreds of miles through jungle, desert and local war zones) when both their wives were pregnant, an indulgence I thought somehow hung over the narrative like a shadow. That said, the tale Jenkins spins is epic, a remarkable chronicle of will and courage, and he tells it with a fresh, imagistic, you-are-there kind of prose characteristic of only the best travel writers. If you like harrowing, virile adventure stories with a touch of existential rumination thrown in you won't be disappointed with this one.
  • YSOP
As an accomplished long-distance motorcycle rider, and owner of the formidable BMW R100GSPD (Paris-Dakar) Offroad Adventure Tourer, I had been long fascinated by Timbuktu. When terrorists and Taureg raiders ambushed rally racers in recent years, and the Dakar rally moved to South America, this book explains why this has been a land barred to Western adventurers for many centuries. These are true stories of both recent and historical attempts of intrepid travelers to reach the legendary city, and was for me an opportunity to live vicariously through their attempts, struggles, defeats and eventual success without mortal risk.
  • Larosa
I went to high school and was on the swim team with the author so I knew the four major characters of this book. It was a compelling read and the photos took me back. Objectively, it was well written and the subject matter alone will keep your interest!
  • Uafrmaine
This is a wonderful adventure narrative written by a white American from Wyoming about an adventure (undertaken sometime in the early 1990s) kayaking West Africa's Niger River with his best friend. Along the way Jenkins (the author) & company locate the source of the Niger (with help from an African guide, of course), are swarmed by bees, upended by crocodiles, and charged by hippopottami. Some of my favorite passages are Jenkins' descriptions of his encounters with Africans and African culture. In this regard, in Guinea, where Jenkins &Co reach the literal end of the road, and in order to continue their journey, find it neccesary to hire local porters. There being an insufficient number of willing men available to accomodate Jenkins' request in the village where they've landed, the method by which members of this village communicate Jenkins' need to the next village miles away is, in my mind, worth the price of the book.

Jenkins' writing is sometimes uneccesarily flowery, at least to my taste. But that criticism in no way takes away from the book's beauty and the strength of its storytelling.
  • Maucage
great book with the mix of history and the story line. I head it with my class of 7/ graders and while I had to 'retract' a handful of choice words and a few passages they enjoyed it realness of it. Maybe better for 9th grade.
  • Manona
Good book, Takes a bit of reading to get into but once you are hooked its a great book.
  • Liarienen
_To Timbukutu_ by Mark Jenkins is an enjoyable and quick read, more adventure travel writing than anything though with some history and a little commentary woven through it. Essentially, the book is one main narrative interspersed with two other narratives. The heart of the book is the account of how the author and three of his friends reached the head of the Niger River in West Africa and were able to journey down its most dangerous sections in kayaks, starting where the river was barely large enough for their one-man boats, contending with rapids, waterfalls, debris in the water, wild currents, hippos, and crocodiles. This main narrative would break from time to time to follow one of two other narratives; either describing adventures the author and one of his friends on the current expedition had in Europe and mostly in Africa a number of years ago (fresh out of high school) or an account of the legion of (very unlucky) European explorers who tried to solve the questions of the source and even the direction the Niger River flowed as well as the location of the fabled city of Timbuktu.

I really liked Jenkin's writing style as he was quite descriptive and very witty. I loved how he described in his story of himself and his friend Mike, bored with Europe, when they both decided to go to Africa. "It was a word from the boundlessness of childhood. Big and deep as the sky." Or how he described that there were only certain times in your life when you can do certain things, such as to go out to see the world. If you waited too long to go, "the seeds of cynicism and fearfulness have already taken root and you shall be a loathsome traveler."

A good book, for once I don't have a lot to say about something I have read. While not action-movie standards of adventure, Jenkins did describe an interesting experience. While he didn't give as detailed a portrait of the lives of Africans as other books I have read, there were some very memorable scenes and people in this book. I liked reading about the many explorers who attempted the Niger and to reach Timbuktu, though I had read much of that before and in greater detail. I guess what I liked most was his writing style; his put-you-there descriptiveness of what he saw and experienced.