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Download Tell Me Something about Buddhism: Questions and Answers for the Curious Beginner eBook

by Thich Nhat Hanh,Zenju Earthlyn Manuel

Download Tell Me Something about Buddhism: Questions and Answers for the Curious Beginner eBook
ISBN:
1571746587
Author:
Thich Nhat Hanh,Zenju Earthlyn Manuel
Category:
Buddhism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hampton Roads Publishing; First Printing edition (October 1, 2011)
Pages:
144 pages
EPUB book:
1722 kb
FB2 book:
1321 kb
DJVU:
1946 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
731


Zenju Earthlyn Manuel's book Tell Me Something about Buddhism offers both the story of her spiritual rite of passage from a black girl to a Buddhist priest, and a hands-on manual with the basic questions that many are afraid to ask. How does a black woman find life in Buddhism?

Zenju Earthlyn Manuel's book Tell Me Something about Buddhism offers both the story of her spiritual rite of passage from a black girl to a Buddhist priest, and a hands-on manual with the basic questions that many are afraid to ask. How does a black woman find life in Buddhism? This book is a warm and compassionate guide of one woman's journey out of oppression to a life of freedom.

Written by Soto Zen priest Zenju Earthlyn Manuel and organized in an easy-to-use Question and Answer format, this brief book answers the many common questions people have about Buddhism, everything from who was Buddha to why do mo For anyone curious about th. .

Written by Soto Zen priest Zenju Earthlyn Manuel and organized in an easy-to-use Question and Answer format, this brief book answers the many common questions people have about Buddhism, everything from who was Buddha to why do mo For anyone curious about the teachings of Buddha and modern Buddhist practice, Tell Me Something about Buddhism offers the perfect introduction

Электронная книга "Tell Me Something About Buddhism: Questions and Answers for the Curious Beginner", Zenju Earthlyn Manuel.

Электронная книга "Tell Me Something About Buddhism: Questions and Answers for the Curious Beginner", Zenju Earthlyn Manuel. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Tell Me Something About Buddhism: Questions and Answers for the Curious Beginner" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

This is the perfect beginner's guide to Buddhism

This is the perfect beginner's guide to Buddhism. Organised in an easy to use Question and Answer format, Manuel answers the many common questions people have about Buddhism, such as: – "e;Do you have a book like the Bible or Koran?"e; – "e;What do Buddhists believe?"e; – "e;Are there core teachings?"e; – "e;Do you believe in a god?"e; – "e;Do some people have good karma and some. bad?"e; – "e;Why do the monks, nuns and priests shave their heads?"e; Manuel, also, intertwines her personal experiences as a dharma practitioner, her.

Zenju Earthlyn Manuel’s new book, Tell Me Something about Buddhism: Questions and Answers for the Curious . After reading Tell Me Something about Buddhism, I wanted Manuel to tell me a little more about her life and practice.

Zenju Earthlyn Manuel’s new book, Tell Me Something about Buddhism: Questions and Answers for the Curious Beginner, is a simple yet uncommon introduction to the Buddha’s teachings. Manuel, an African-American Zen priest, takes a direct and personal approach to the dharma. How did you come to Buddhism?

In Buddhism for Beginners Chodron presents the basics of Buddhism in a conversational, question-and-answer format.

In Buddhism for Beginners Chodron presents the basics of Buddhism in a conversational, question-and-answer format. People who recommend this book say the author does a good job of clearing up misunderstandings about Buddhism and providing a Buddhist perspective on modern issues. 03. of 07. The Heart of the Buddha's Teaching, by Thich Nhat Hahn. The Ven. Thich Nhat Hahn is a Vietnamese Zen master and peace activist who has written several excellent books. The Heart of the Buddha's Teaching is a good companion book to read after The Miracle of Mindfulness.

Recorded the week of March 26, 2012 my spin on a few books currently being read: "Tell Me Something About Buddhism: questions and answers for the curious beginner "by Zenju Earthlyn Manuel "The Great Crash Ahead: strategies for a world turned upside down" by Harry S. Dent, Jr.

Books by Thich Nhat Hanh Written by Soto Zen priest Zenju Earthlyn Manuel and organized in an easy-to-use Question an.

Books by Thich Nhat Hanh. Books by Thrangu Rinpoche. Books by Thubten Chodron. For anyone curious about the teachings of Buddha and modern Buddhist practice, Tell Me Something about Buddhism offers the perfect introduction. Written by Soto Zen priest Zenju Earthlyn Manuel and organized in an easy-to-use Question and Answer format, this brief book answers the many common questions people have about Buddhism, everything from who was Buddha to why do monks, nuns, and priests shave their heads.

For anyone curious about the teachings of Buddha and modern Buddhist practice, Tell Me Something about .

For anyone curious about the teachings of Buddha and modern Buddhist practice, Tell Me Something about Buddhism offers the perfect introduction.

For anyone curious about the teachings of Buddha and modern Buddhist practice, Tell Me Something about Buddhism offers the perfect introduction. Written by Soto Zen priest Zenju Earthlyn Manuel and organized in an easy-to-use Question and Answer format, this brief book answers the many common questions people have about Buddhism, everything from who was Buddha to why do monks, nuns, and priests shave their heads.

Manuel, who was been involved in Buddhist practice for over twenty years, after an L.A. upbringing in an African-American Christian church, intertwines throughout the book her personal experiences as one of the first African-American Zen priests. Her life in the Sangha, her teaching in local communities, and her travels around the world meeting other Buddhist practitioners enliven her answers to the most fundamental questions about Buddhist practice. She writes, "Had I not opened myself to the many teachings from the earth, such as Buddha's wisdom, it would have been nearly impossible to survive the fires of my soul." Included are about 20 illustrations by the author in charcoal-and-pencil style.

  • xander
An exceptionally personal and introspective journey, as well as a simple expose on Buddhism itself. The book is written very well and is a quick but deep read. Zenju shares with us her struggles and insights in applying Buddhist teachings to her life, keeping it honest. Very glad I purchased this book.
  • Malann
Excellent brief work mostly useful as introductory reading on Zen, though even as a well-read Zen person myself, I'm thoroughly enjoying it. It's immediate, direct, and addressing/coming from perspective of an under-represented group in American Buddhism-- African Americans. I recommend you read it in small doses by the chapter, not cover-to-cover.
  • heart of sky
Zenju answers questions beautifully about her experience with Buddhism. Very easy to read and really relates to Americans with Christian backgrounds. I want everyone to read it.
  • Use_Death
Buddhism can be approached simply through short introductory books or in studies of great complexity. "Tell me Something about Buddhism: Questions and Answers for the Curious Beginner" is a work in the former category with moments of substantial insight. There is a freshness to the book.

Ekai Zenju is the Dharma name of an ordained Zen priest, a status the author explains in the course of the book. Her given name is Earthlyn Manuel, with the title "Zenju". Manuel has been practicing Buddhism for over 20 years. She began in the Nichren school, and in 2008 received ordination as a Zen priest. Manuel holds an MA in Urban Planning and a PhD in Transformation and Consciousness from the California Institute of Integral Studies. She is an African American woman with roots in Louisiana who was raised in California.

Her little book is effective in the way it combines her personal story with and introduction to Buddhism. Manuel begins with a discussion of how she became attracted to Buddhism, coming from a background of African American Christianity and civil rights activism. Manuel was approached by Buddhist teachers from Nichren. She resisted at first but gradually was drawn to the teachings. She aptly observes: "I did not choose Buddha's path as much as I had been chosen by it." When asked by relatives and other people what she, as an African American woman, found valuable about Buddhism, she says: "To follow the ancient teachings of Buddha was to be life affirming. On the path of Buddha's teachings, I returned, through chanting and meditation to that place within that had not been touched by the suffering of hatred. In following the path of Buddha, I began to peel off the masks that covered my original face. In the practice of Buddha's love, I eventually became aware of my life in all of its difficult and glorious moments."

The book is in a question and answer format. This is a device that I have found ineffective in other contexts, but it works here. Manuel poses and offers elementary answers to basic questions about Buddha and Buddhism. Her approach combines introductions to Buddhist teachings with her own life experience. She writes simply and often pithily. She uses small charcoal drawings and poems of her own making as well as quotations from other Buddhist teachers. The book has a feel of personal experience.

The questions range from "Who was the Buddha and What did he Teach" to questions regarding the Four Noble Truths, the Eightfold Path, the Doctrine of Karma, the nature of enlightenment, the purpose of meditation and chanting, Buddhism's teachings about death, Buddhism and theism, and much more. Towards the end of the book, several questions address Buddhism and women and Buddhism and multiculturalism, particularly as it involves African American practitioners.

Much of what Manuel says is striking. In discussing the eight-fold path, for example, she discusses and qualifies the usual translation of "right" action, "right" intention, and so forth by substituting the term "complete" for right. She does so "for the sake of avoiding a sense of right and wrong or confusing this path with rules." Manuel explains further: "Complete refers to doing what is beneficial to living an awakened life, living in a way that does not cause suffering. The path aligns with actions of the body, speech, and heart-mind."

Manuel makes a similar observation when discussing Buddhist precepts and comparing them to the Ten Commandments and other teachings of Western religions. She writes: "The precepts are meant to assist us in valuing life and in not judging the self or each other from a righteous place. They are not principles to measure someone's flaws or level of spirituality. There is no external punishment for breaking these precepts. Mostly, the precepts describe how an awakened person lives mindful of the possible suffering caused by his or her actions. In this way of caring for each other, we nurture a spiritually based social justice."

In discussing how Buddhism helps individuals deal with dissatisfaction with and in their lives, Manuel offers her experiences chanting the Heart Sutra and says as well: "take time to view life without an old story, to walk without thoughts of how you look, to listen without interpretation, to taste something as if for the first time, or to smell and not name what you are smelling. Move through the world without thoughts of liking or disliking this and that."

Overall, Manuel recoginzes that Buddhist wisdom is not to be learned from a book, "even this one", but from patience, reflection,
and an attempt at understanding. In "Final Words" at the end of the book, Manuel summarizes:

"Know that it it is difficult to learn Buddha's teachings through explanations. Know that I have made an attempt to concretize a teaching that cannot be solidified because wisdom comes from your own life. So you may still feel fuzzy about this practice. It is this fuzziness, coupled with curiosity, that has kept me on the path. I feel genuinely that Buddha intended the practice to be a continuous exploration. Once we become certain, there is no place for learning, and we find ourselves defending our idea with a partial view of things."

I have been studying and attempting to incorporate Buddhist teachings into my life for some time. Manuel's short book for beginners help reinvigorate my efforts. This book is valuable both to readers new to Buddhism and to readers with a substantial practice.

Robin Friedman
  • Monam
This small book is both helpful information about Buddhism as well as a highly personal account of the journey of its author in adopting Buddhism. It is this personal part of the contents that make the book special. It appears the author has been a seeker for many years, trying different spiritual tracks but finally finding rest in Buddhism. She explains how she sees the Buddhist teachings and how she came to understand their meaning in her life.

Buddhism is different from other religions. It does not center on worshiping a God and it does not demand of you acceptance of particular beliefs or mandate specific activity. It does have teachings that are built around compassion and offers the life of Buddha as an example of how to live. Its usual activities are chanting and meditating. You do not "convert" to Buddhism like you might convert to Catholicsm by accepting its beliefs, and it is not meant to define your identity, as you might say "I am a Baptist." Rather, Buddhism is a path you follow that leads you into its meaning for you. Its value is in the personal way you perceive its teachings and precepts.

The author, an African-American woman, sought to deal with the demons of a painful childhood and a profund sense of self-rejection. But her sufffering is not unique to her cultural background. I am not African-American, but I could easily identify with her feelings of rejection. I found her honesty and openness touching, and felt she sincerely wants to use this book to communicate her own experience of being transformed by Buddhist teachings. Since enlightenment does not happen by logical discourse, she tries to take us on parts of her own journey as a way for us to see how Buddhist practice can transform and heal.

In a series of common question about Buddhism, Zenju Earthalyn Manuel provides her own explanations. I like the simple title of this book and its enhancement with delightful little drawings by the author. These are Asian-style, but each is unique. The author may have intended this book mainly for African-American women, but it is a good introduction to both the teachings and the impact of Buddhism in the words of an unlikely adopter.