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by Subhash Kak

Download Asvamedha: The Rite and its Logic eBook
ISBN:
8120818776
Author:
Subhash Kak
Category:
Hinduism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Motilal Banarsidass Publishers of India; 1st edition (January 1, 2002)
Pages:
71 pages
EPUB book:
1345 kb
FB2 book:
1744 kb
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1279 kb
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Rating:
4.7
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477


This book describes the ASVAMEDHA rite and its symbolism to explain distinctive aspects of the Vedic sacrifice system. Several questions related to the Asvamedha are posed and answered in the context of Vedic epistemology

This book describes the ASVAMEDHA rite and its symbolism to explain distinctive aspects of the Vedic sacrifice system. Several questions related to the Asvamedha are posed and answered in the context of Vedic epistemology. This rite has three important functions: (i) it presents and equivalence of the naksatra year to the heaven.

Subhash Kak at Foundations of Quantum Mechanics Conference, Växjö . The Asvamedha: The Rite and Its Logic, Motilal Banarsidass Publishers, (2002).

Subhash Kak at Foundations of Quantum Mechanics Conference, Växjö, Sweden. Kak's work influenced Raja Ram Mohan Roy's 1999 book- Vedic Physics, which sought to prove that the RigVeda was coded per the laws of quantum and particle physics. Kak wrote the foreword to this book commending Roy's interpetations as a new way of looking at Vedic Physics. The Prajna Sutra: Aphorisms of Intuition, DK Printworld, 2007.

Subhash Kak. Birth and Early Development of Indian Astronomy. New Light on the Indus Civilization, Aryan Books, Delhi 1998. The Aśvamedha: The rite and its logic. In Astronomy across cultures: The History of Non-Western Astronomy, Helaine Selin (ed), Kluwer, 2000. The Homeland of the Aryans. Evidence of Rigvedic Flora and Fauna & Archaeology, New Delhi, Aryan Books International. The Asvamedha Horse of India. From Harappan horse to camel, R. Nagaswamy in The Hindu.

Subhash Chandra Kak, Indian engineering educator, writer. Asvamedha: The Rite and its Logic. Fellow: Indian Institute Advanced Study.

Subhash Kak (Kak, Subhash). used books, rare books and new books. by Subhash Kak. ISBN 9788120818774 (978-81-208-1877-4) Hardcover, Motilal Banarsidass Publishers of India, 2002. Find all books by 'Subhash Kak' and compare prices Find signed collectible books by 'Subhash Kak'. Astronomical Code of the Rgveda. ISBN 9788121509862 (978-81-215-0986-2) Hardcover, Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers, 2013. Find signed collectible books: 'Asvamedha: The Rite and its Logic'.

I. Contact US. Saujanya Books : 165-E, Kamla Nagar, Delhi - 110007 (India).

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THE ASVAMEDHA The rite and its logic Subhash Kak Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge 2001 c 2001 by Subhash Kak April 2001 iii Contents Preface 1. Introduction . Baton Rouge, Sivartri a February 21, 2001

The rite and its logic. Subhash Kak. Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge. c 2001 by Subhash Kak April 2001. 1 Introduction This essay describes several aspects of the Avamedha s rite, the horse-sacrice, and summarizes its logic. It is called the king of sacrice in the Satapatha Brhmana (SB 1. 1), whose Knda 13 is a . .devoted exclusively to the rite. The Aitareya and Kaus a. taki Brhmanas have nothing on it. The.

Kak's book The Asvamedha: The Rite and Its Logic (2002) provides an interpretation of the Vedic aśvamedhá (horse .

Kak's book The Asvamedha: The Rite and Its Logic (2002) provides an interpretation of the Vedic aśvamedhá (horse sacrifice) rite. He shows that the details of this rite are connected to the Agnicayana ritual. In the books The Nature of Physical Reality and Mind and Self and other publications, Kak argues that there are limits to the extent the world is computable.

Kak's work influenced Raja Ram Mohan Roy's 1999 book- Vedic Physics, which sought to prove that the RigVeda was coded per the laws of.

Kak's work influenced Raja Ram Mohan Roy's 1999 book- Vedic Physics, which sought to prove that the RigVeda was coded per the laws of quantum and particle physics. The Architecture of Knowledge: Quantum Mechanics, Neuroscience, Computers and Consciousness, Motilal Banarsidass, 2004

This book describes the ASVAMEDHA rite and its symbolism to explain distinctive aspects of the Vedic sacrifice system. Several questions related to the Asvamedha are posed and answered in the context of Vedic epistemology. This rite has three important functions: (i) it presents and equivalence of the naksatra year to the heaven, implying that it is rite that celebrates the rebirth of the Sun; (ii) it is symbolic of the conquest of Time by the king, in whose name the rite is performed; and (iii) it is celebration of social harmony achieved by the transcendence of the fundamental conflicts between various sources of power. Numbers from another Vedic rite, the Agnicayana; help in the understanding of several of its details.
  • bass
This is a brilliantly written book by the Louisiana State University Professor (Emeritus) Subash Kak, a well-respected academic and a Hindu scholar. Asvamedha is described as one of the most significant rituals in the Hindu Scriptures and many commentators are intrigued by the scale of the sacrificial rites and the meaning associated with its performance. Asvamedha is a sacrifice (horse sacrifice) that is a renewal of the Sun at the New Year, and also the renewal of king's rule as well. At the spiritual level, it is a celebration to be reconnected to the "inner" Sun. It is also a celebration of the social harmony achieved by the transcendence of the fundamental conflicts between various sources of power. It is called the king of all sacrifices in Satapata Brahmana (SB. 13.2.2.1). The 13th kanda is exclusively related to the performance of this ritual.

In this book, the author suggests that the ritual is symbolic in nature and not literal. Of all the animals conceived within a body, the horse is considered as time, the Asvamedha is the most mystical and powerful celebration, because it delves into the mystery of time and immortality. In Rig-Veda 1.163.2, horse is said to symbolic of the Sun, and Tittiriya Samhita 7.5.25., says that the whole universe is the sacrificial horse. Similar meaning is conveyed in Vajasaneyi Samhita 11.12. The confusion arise when the oldest text like Rig-Veda is treated as ritualistic document and yajnas are treated as a literal performance of a rite, but Rig-Veda is more than a text of rituals. It has four languages; the metaphysics of existence (sat) and non-existence (asat), which evolved into a very mature form in the Upanishads; images and sacrifices (yajna), which illustrate the human's efforts to connect with nature that comprises both materialistic and non-materialistic forms. Hence the Vedic sacrifices operate through the languages of asat, sat, transformation and embodied vision, says the author. The Vedic ritual is also related to the ongoing struggle between devas and asuras, where devas represents the cognitive system and the asuras the material nature of the body (Chandogya Upanishad 8.-14; Brihadaranyaka Upanishad 1.3.1). The Aitareya Brahmana 1.14 speaks of how the devas thought of kingship in order to defeat the asuras with whom the conflict was not going well for devas. The consecration of a king was done by Rajasuya sacrifice and its further rejuvenation by the Vajapeya and Asvamedha sacrifices. The latter is performed by a consecrated king assisted by his four wives. The Vedic ritual was performed at an altar and the design is based astronomical numbers related to solar and lunar years. The Asvamedha altar consists of numbers; 21 stakes, 260 wild animals and 337 domestic animals. The enactment of this sacrifice brings fame and regenerates power for the king. When Indra lost his vital powers, it was restored by a sacrifice (Satapata Brahmana 12.8.1.1).

The author cautions that we must not read the descriptions of ritual literally The sacrifice engages the performer to bridge the disconnected spirit with body and transforms into a higher being. This is stressed clearly in Isa Upanishad 14. The Vedic scholars and historians have suggested that the original sacrifice was real and the symbolic enactment came later. In Satapata Brahmana 6.2.1.39, prior to king Syaparna Sayakayana, sacrifice of different animals were in practice, but later it was limited only to goat (aja) (Satapata Brahmana 3.2.2.9). The book has diagrams of various sacrifices and the author show how they are related to each other by numbers. This is a very interesting little book to read and I highly recommend.

1. The Satapatha Brahmana (Sanskrit Text with English Translation, Notes, Introduction and Index of Julius Eggeling) 3 Volume Set
2. The Satapatha Brahmana 4 Volume Set Sanskrit Text with English Translation, Notes & Index
  • Efmprof
First, there is a great deal to disagree with in this work. Personally I think actual vs metaphorical sacrifices were probably equivalent in the beginning, and that attempts to place one before the other largely project modern prejudices onto the past. However, arguing this here would make this review into a very long one. For a short version, it's based on considering the nature of the observations about oral traditions in Orality and Literacy (New Accents) by Walter Ong and The Singer of Tales by Albert Lord. Also, the omission of the scripted "time with the horse" seems to me to to be once again an attempt to sanitize this rite for modern readers. A portion of this piece of the rite, however, is translated in How to Kill a Dragon: Aspects of Indo-European Poetics by Calvert Watkins and compared in that work to an Irish ritual that Gerard of Wales mentioned in the Middle Ages.

Finally, I don't think the author's assertion that "asva" could have originally been a word for the sun which was later associated with the horse is tenable in the wake of modern approaches to historical linguistics. Asva is probably cognate with Latin equus and common Germanic ehwaz. The k-s (the satem shift) and u-v shifts are typical of the development of Sanscrit from early Proto-Indo-European generally (compare early PIE *kemtum, -> Latin Centum, with Sanscrit satem for example).

Nonetheless, this is an important contribution to the field for those interested in comparative studies regarding Indo-Europeans, as well as those interested in studying the Vedas themselves. The discussion of performance and meaning is quite compatible with the views on oral traditions in the works mentioned above, and bolsters the view that interpretation is secondary to performance against the backdrop of tradition. Moreover, the interpretation of the horse as universe as a whole provides fertile ground for comparative studies (for example to the world in Norse myth through the sacrifice of Ymir).

Moreover, the attention to detail in the portions of the rite covered are quite fascinating, particularly in the wake of the spacial ritual comparisons between India and Ireland in Celtic Heritage: Ancient Tradition in Ireland and Wales. The discussion of cycle for cycle substitutions and the like is also worth reading.

On the whole, this is a book that despite my disagreements gave me many "aha" moments. I'd highly recommend it despite the cautions.