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Download Torah of the Mothers : Contemporary Jewish Women Read Classical Jewish Texts eBook

by Ora Wiskind Elper

Download Torah of the Mothers : Contemporary Jewish Women Read Classical Jewish Texts eBook
ISBN:
9657108233
Author:
Ora Wiskind Elper
Category:
Judaism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Urim Pubns; First Edition edition (December 15, 2000)
Pages:
510 pages
EPUB book:
1537 kb
FB2 book:
1778 kb
DJVU:
1477 kb
Other formats
lit rtf azw doc
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
797


Torah of the Mothers book. Torah of the Mothers is a landmark collection of essays and teachings culled from years of Bible and Jewish studies by highly accomplished women Torah scholars and educators.

Torah of the Mothers book.

Torah of the Mothers: Co. .has been added to your Cart. One aspect of this book that I found incredibly exciting was the academic, spiritual and personal dialogue created between younger scholars and their veteran mentors. I see this volume as a catalyst in the process of transforming the woman's Torah to the nation's Torah and highly recommend it to one and al. -Malke Binah, founder and director, Matan Women's Institute of Torah Studies. Ora Wiskind Elper is a teacher of Jewish thought at Michlalah College, Matan Institute for Women’s Studies, and Touro College in Jerusalem.

Torah of the Mothers is divided into four sections: the first is comprised of essays written by contributors about their .

Torah of the Mothers is divided into four sections: the first is comprised of essays written by contributors about their relationships, both intellectual and emotional, with their teachers. The second group of essays is on biblical texts. Some focus on figures of women in the Bible while others investigate various aspects of the patriarchs. Jewish Studies and Jewish Identity: Some Implications of Secularizing Torah By Cooperman, Bernard D. Judaism: A Quarterly Journal of Jewish Life and Thought, Vol. 42, No. 2, Spring 1993. Is Religion the Root of All Evil?

Torah of the Mothers: Contemporary Jewish Women Read Classical Jewish Texts (2000) Gail Twersky . American Jewish Women’s History and Material Culture: Joyce Antler.

Torah of the Mothers: Contemporary Jewish Women Read Classical Jewish Texts (2000) Gail Twersky Reiner and Judith Kates, eds. Beginning Anew: A Woman’s Companion to the High Holy Days (1997) Susan Weidman Schneider. Jewish and Female: Choices and Changes in Our Lives Today. The Journey Home: How Jewish Women Shaped Modern America (1997) Joyce Antler, ed. Talking Back: Images of Jewish Women in American Popular Culture (1998) Charlotte Baum, Paula Hyman, and Sonya Michel. The Jewish Woman in America (1975) Pamela Nadell, ed.

In Torah of the Mothers, contemporary women also reflect upon teachers who have personally influenced and inspired them. Rav Joseph Dov Soloveitchik, Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan, Rabbi Menachem Schneerson, the Lubavitcher Rebbe and Nechama Leibowitz, of blessed memories, are among the mentors who played, and continue to play, a meaningful role in their lives

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Torah of the Mothers : Contemporary Jewish Women Read Classical Jewish Texts. Combining erudition with a deep concern for the daily aspects of spiritual life, "Torah of the Mothers" is a landmark collection of essays and teachings culled from years of Bible and Jewish study by highly accomplished female Torah scholars and educators.

Ora Wiskind-Elper is Associate Professor in the Graduate Programme in Jewish Thought at Michlalah . By Ora Wiskind-Elper. The case for exploring human nature and identity through the lens of the Chassidic masters.

Ora Wiskind-Elper is Associate Professor in the Graduate Programme in Jewish Thought at Michlalah Jerusalem College and at Ono Academic College, Israel. Follow Ora Wiskind-Elper. Chassidism and Academia: The Heart of the Matter (Video).

Ours is an era of profound spiritual searching, in which the role of the Jewish woman is being reexamined. Torah of the Mothers is a landmark collection of essays and teachings culled from years of Bible and Jewish study by highly accomplished women Torah scholars and educators.

Each contributor brings her own area of expertise to bear, providing novel and refreshing insights into biblical and rabbinic texts. Each also offers thought-provoking commentary on the ever present themes of exile and redemption, which are intrinsic to the ongoing saga of the Jewish people.

In Torah of the Mothers, contemporary women also reflect upon teachers who have personally influenced and inspired them. Rav Joseph Dov Soloveitchik, Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan, Rabbi Menachem Schneerson, the Lubavitcher Rebbe and Nechama Leibowitz, of blessed memories, are among the mentors who played, and continue to play, a meaningful role in their lives.

Torah of the Mothers combines erudition with deep concern for the daily aspects of our spiritual lives.

  • Umge
This is a BEAUTIFUL book, about BEAUTIFUL women. The type of world changing beauty that comes from the inside. It is comforting to know that there are REAL women, in this world, who have make a HEALTHY difference.
  • Querlaca
Since we would like to believe that Judaism and the Torah are for men and women, and since women have their own perspective on subjects, this volume is an important contribution to Judaism.
The volume contains twenty-three chapters by twenty-three female Orthodox contributors, all college graduates and most with post graduate degrees. The book is divided into four parts. The first five chapters discuss significant Jewish teachers, such as Rabbi Soloveitchik and Nechama Leibowitz. The next seven chapters analyze biblical texts, including what the story of the daughters of Tzlafchad says about women's issues. Four chapters on readings of rabbinic texts follow, such as an evaluation of three parables about a king and his daughter. The final section of seven chapters addresses "exile and redemption," such as "Exodus and the Feminine in the Teachings of Rabbi Yaakov of Izbica."
An example is the story of Tzlafchad`s daughters in Numbers 27:1-9. The daughters petitioned Moses for a change in the then-existing practices to allow them to inherit land. The author uses the story to show how modern women can petition rabbis for changes in Judaism. Eight logical steps are described. The first two are that women should: (1) identify the underlying spiritual principle that is being violated and (2) bring up the issue at the right time. This author suggests that rabbis should follow Moses' example and listen with an open mind.
Another example is a detailed analysis of a midrashic tale about Rabbi Hanina ben Dosa, a very poor man. Unable to afford a sacrifice, he travels to a desert and carves and paints a stone to offer to the Temple. He cannot carry the stone to Jerusalem and angels help him. The author identifies dozens of narrative elements in the tale and suggests how they can be understood. She also clarifies the historical context that prompted the story and its message.
A third example examines the strange encounter of the patriarch Jacob with Pharaoh in Genesis 47:7-10. We would have expected a meeting of substance, but all that occurs is that Pharaoh asks Jacob his age, he replies 130 and complains that life has been hard, and then Jacob blesses Pharaoh and leaves. The author discusses the explanations of the episode offered by the classical interpreters, and gives her own solution.
A fourth example is an analysis of the five instances in the beginning of Exodus where the newly freed Israelites whine, moan and groan against God and Moses. The author shows that each complaint is a rhetorical question, such as "Were there no graves in Egypt that you took us to die in the wilderness?" There is no real request for an answer or for help, as if the former slaves were unaccustomed to ask overseers for help. The author examines the hidden agendas and the psychology underlying the five questions.
The book in short is a refreshing look at Judaism from a new eye-opening perspective.
  • Talrajas
I was so excited to read this book. For me, the essays, mostly, do not live up to the book's title. There is very little "reading of classical texts." My sense of that term means going under and behind the text for those of us who don't read Hebrew. The writers tried, I think, but their writing was very turgid, repetitive and seemed to try too hard to be scholarly or profound.
Two parts of the book show the writers interacting with their own mentors in "learning to read." Those sections were excellent.
I donated my copy to my local Temple.
  • Vushura
Really enjoying this book, packed with great stories full of torah principles from a unique point of view. Put on your thinking cap!
  • avanger
Thoughtful essays, always a plus to hear the perspective of classically trained, intelligent woman.A worthwhile purchase.
  • Hellblade
A great resource for any Jew interested in Midrash.