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Download Be Still and Get Going: A Jewish Meditation Practice for Real Life eBook

by Alan Lew

Download Be Still and Get Going: A Jewish Meditation Practice for Real Life eBook
ISBN:
0316739103
Author:
Alan Lew
Category:
Judaism
Language:
English
Publisher:
Little, Brown and Company (August 30, 2005)
Pages:
272 pages
EPUB book:
1522 kb
FB2 book:
1534 kb
DJVU:
1206 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
139


That said, there is real wisdom in this book. Lew was a fine storyteller, and he brings real insight into his Torah readings.

Temporarily out of stock. That said, there is real wisdom in this book. I particularly liked his chapter on "Sacred Emptiness," where he mentions that the Holy of Holies in ancient Jerusalem Temple was in fact an empty space. Sometimes, it was regarded as the place of God's actual presence (as the Tent of Meeting was during the wanderings in the wilderness), but for the most part it was empty.

Alan Lew weaves together the Exodus into householder life with a Buddhist philosophy made palpable, as it appeared .

Alan Lew weaves together the Exodus into householder life with a Buddhist philosophy made palpable, as it appeared I was living the experience. I had just driven 4 hours north, my longest solo drive. Exhausted upon arrival on a solo retreat, Susan my new friend must have recognized my state. Oct 27, 2007 Jamey rated it liked it.

Lew's first book, "One God Clapping (Jewish Lights Publishing, 2/01), was a. .

Lew's first book, "One God Clapping (Jewish Lights Publishing, 2/01), was a "San Francisco Chronicle bestseller and winner of the PEN Josephine Miles Award for Literary Excellence.

I recommend this book with all my heart.

Jewish Book Council, founded in 1944, is the longest-running organization devoted exclusively to the support and celebration of Jewish literature.

Bibliographic Details. Publisher: Little, Brown and Company. Publication Date: 2005. Book Condition: New. About this title.

When he got to the bridge, he wanted to go to the spot where he had dreamed the treasure was hidden, but there was a watchman standing guard there

When he got to the bridge, he wanted to go to the spot where he had dreamed the treasure was hidden, but there was a watchman standing guard there. Azyk paced back and forth on the bridge all day long and into the night, but the watchman never budged. In fact he finally became aware of Azyk and his pacing, so he approached him and asked him what he was doing there. Azyk told him the truth. He had come to the Warsaw bridge because he had dreamed the night before that a treasure was hidden there.

Lew's first book, "One God Clapping (Jewish Lights Publishing, 2/01), was a "San Francisco Chronicle bestseller and winner of the PEN Josephine Miles Award for Literary Excellence.

Going online and taking the plane. From San Francisco to Jerusalem. The physical and electronic networks of ‘Jewish mindfulness.

New York: Little, Brown. Lew, Alan, and Sherril Jaffe. One God Clapping: The Spiritual Path of a Zen Rabbi. Nashville, TN: Jewish Lights Publishing. Going online and taking the plane.

My long term illness is finally going away, and I think I might have found the love of my life. Dismiss the compulsion to live with the ghosts of yester-year. Embrace the present, which is the only moment that can ever be.

- Written in a warm, accessible, and intimate style, BE STILL AND GET GOING will touch those who are searching for an authentic spiritual practice that speaks to them in their own cultural language.- Lew's first book, "One God Clapping (Jewish Lights Publishing, 2/01), was a "San Francisco Chronicle bestseller and winner of the PEN Josephine Miles Award for Literary Excellence. "Publishers Weekly hailed him as "a perceptive thinker" for his "refreshing and sometimes startling perspective" in his last book, "This Is Real and You Are Completely Unprepared (Little, Brown and Company, 2003).- Lew is one of the most sought-after rabbis on the lecture circuit. He has had national media exposure for his dynamic fusion of Eastern insight and Bible study, having been the subject of stories on ABC News, the "McNeil Lehrer News Hour, and various NPR programs.- In the past five years there have been national conferences on Jewish meditation in San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Miami where Lew has been a featured speaker.
  • Heri
I first fund this book at the library and fell in love with it! I had to turn the book back in to the library and was so pleased to discover it on Amazon! This book is a keeper and one of my favorites!
  • great ant
There is major problem at the heart of this book: the subtitle really does not describe its contents. To be sure, there is something about meditation in here, and of course Lew had vast experience with it, given his founding of a meditation center connected to a synagogue and his years in Buddhist practice. But for the most part, "Jewish meditation practice", particularly the "practice" part, really recedes into the background and only makes occasional cameo appearances after the first chapter. If you are interested in Jewish meditation, I would strongly recommend Jeff Roth's Jewish Meditation Practices for Everyday Life: Awakening Your Heart, Connecting with God, which was published in March 2009.

That said, there is real wisdom in this book. Lew was a fine storyteller, and he brings real insight into his Torah readings. I particularly liked his chapter on "Sacred Emptiness," where he mentions that the Holy of Holies in ancient Jerusalem Temple was in fact an empty space. Sometimes, it was regarded as the place of God's actual presence (as the Tent of Meeting was during the wanderings in the wilderness), but for the most part it was empty. And maybe, he suggests, that IS the meaning of God's presence: the discovery of the emptiness at the heart of life. We can create sacredness in everyday life not by always connecting it to some Grand Telos, but rather by living in the present and appreciating it for what it is. Like the Tabernacle, we create a structure around our lives, but we cannot answer that complete emptiness. The challenge is to live with it and make it meaningful for ourselves. That is why one has to "be still" before one can "get going." Acheive calmness, and then explore. At least that's the way I read him.

Lew was not a great theologian, but he was a good writer, and the book is a nice, gentle introduction to many Jewish themes. It also has some useful spiritual practice points. In that sense, it is useful and worth reading.

I recently discovered that Lew died this past January at the all-too-early age of 65. But he left a legacy of an important institution (Makor Or), and his three books, all of which help to communicate a thoughtful, spritual Judaism. Rest in peace.
  • Anasius
Run, don't walk to read the amazing Alan Lew. His wisdom reaches into your soul and stays there for you to absorb and claim in your own way.
  • monotronik
Rabbi Lew provides a deep, compelling, heartful vision of Jewish spirituality and practice here. I have bought this book for several friends and teachers. Highly recommended exposition of the "inner meaning" of Jewish thought and practice, esp. for those with an appreciation for Buddhist-based teachings.

Yes, it is somewhat mis-titled, as another reviewer noted. It is not focused around seated meditation per se
  • Ballalune
Rabbi Lew has written a very readable, engrossing book. A friend of mine has been trying to get me interested in meditation. Rabbi Lew's book certainly has accomplished that. His Jewish orientation is especially good. I now look at meditation far differently. He certainly reached his goal.
  • SiIеnt
Loaned to me by a chaplain, who said as soon as he finished it, he wanted to read it again. I felt the same and bought the book for myself and copies for my two adult children. It's a must for an adult Jew seeking his/her place in our variegated community. It's a profound adaptation of Zen discipline to deepen one's understanding of sacred classical Jewish texts.
  • RuTGamer
A classic on inner work
Helped me with my meditation journey.