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Download Entering the Circle: The Secrets of Ancient Siberian Wisdom Discovered by a Russian Psychiatrist eBook

by Olga Kharitidi

Download Entering the Circle: The Secrets of Ancient Siberian Wisdom Discovered by a Russian Psychiatrist eBook
ISBN:
0062514156
Author:
Olga Kharitidi
Category:
Religious Studies
Language:
English
Publisher:
Harper San Francisco; 1st edition (September 1, 1996)
Pages:
224 pages
EPUB book:
1780 kb
FB2 book:
1819 kb
DJVU:
1861 kb
Other formats
txt mbr doc rtf
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
293


Olga Kharitidi was born in Siberia, in the former Soviet Union. I saw this book recommended by a shaman author whose book I absolutely loved

Olga Kharitidi was born in Siberia, in the former Soviet Union. She has traveled extensively throughout Siberia, Uzbekistan, and Kazakhstan, following the ancient wisdom that spread from Siberia to Central Asia, Tibet, and the Himalayas. She is now in the United States, conveying her knowledge of Siberian wisdom and continuing her path of exploration and discovery. I saw this book recommended by a shaman author whose book I absolutely loved. Entering the Circle was initially riveting, beginning like a tightly woven novel with a first-person narrative. But there came a time about a third into the book where I found some aspects of the story hard to believe.

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When the young Russian psychiatrist Olga Kharitidi set out on an impetuous journey into the snowbound Altai Mountains of Siberia .

When the young Russian psychiatrist Olga Kharitidi set out on an impetuous journey into the snowbound Altai Mountains of Siberia, she never dreamed that her experience there would shatter and rebuild her view of reality. Among the wintry villages and pine forests of Siberia, guided by mysterious native sages, Kharitidi unearthed the wellspring of the worlds mystical traditions, discovered deep secrets of healing and magic, and encountered revolutionary teachings about the true nature of the human soul.

Joining an ailing friend on a spontaneous trip to the Atai Mountains, Dr. Kharitidi is taken into apprenticeship by a native Shaman who guides her through bizarre, magical, and often terrifying experiences that open her eyes to a wellspring of deeper learning.

Ancient Secrets of Siberian Wisdom Discovered by a Russian Psychiatrist.

book by Olga Kharitidi Yahontova. Entering the Circle : Ancient Secrets of Siberian Wisdom Discovered by a Russian Psychiatrist. by Olga Kharitidi Yahontova.

item 1 Entering the Circle: Ancient Secrets of Siberian Wisdom Disco New Paperback Book -Entering the Circle: Ancient Secrets of. .Additional Product Features. Place of Publication.

item 1 Entering the Circle: Ancient Secrets of Siberian Wisdom Disco New Paperback Book -Entering the Circle: Ancient Secrets of Siberian Wisdom Disco New Paperback Book. item 3 Entering the Circle: Ancient Secrets of Siberian Wisdom Discovered by a Russian -Entering the Circle: Ancient Secrets of Siberian Wisdom Discovered by a Russian.

Through her remarkable journeys, Dr. Kharitidi teaches us to tap into the limitless possibilities of the human spirit.

This "exciting spiritual adventure" ("Publishers Weekly") reveals the experiences and discoveries of Dr. Olga Kharitidi, a young Russian psychiatrist whose life-altering journey into the mysterious realm of Siberian shamanism led to encounters with the ancient wisdom that formed the very core of the world's religions. Through her remarkable journeys, Dr. 40 people like this topic

The author recounts her discipleship to a Siberian shaman, who taught her the rituals of his isolated Siberian mountain community and their powerful beliefs about consciousness and healing. 50,000 first printing. $75,000 ad/promo. BOMC & QPB. Tour.
  • Unereel
This is one of those books that is too good to be true, yet so far I haven't been able to find any evidence that it isn't. It certainly is reminiscent of the Carlos Castaneda books and just as profound even though it is Kharitidi's first book on the subject and not a particularly long one. It had a lot to say to me personally because it reflected my most heart-felt interests and experiences over more than the last fifty years. Not only did it affirm the basic truth that we create our own realities and ourselves as well, it established the thousands-of-years context for that truth besides. Kharitidi's profession as a psychiatrist ought to have given her account special authority, but for me it lent an even stronger credibility especially because it challenged her training and experience within our definition of what psychiatrists are supposed to know. She was out of her depth and does not demure from admitting it.

Then, as if reading my mind, she introduces a quantum physicist who is researching the relationship between human perception and reality. Now there is a vital connection between ancient shamanism and modern, non-Newtonian physics. That is precisely the connection I have been exploring for the past twenty years or so. Naturally, I'm sold. If our physical reality exists only when it is being observed by our consciousness, then of course we are creating it from perception to perception and distinction to distinction. Ancient seers knew that, and now we have tangible evidence of it as well on an experimental level. This is a BIG realization now confirmed within our formerly "materialist" scientific tradition (although some scientists are still dragging their feet about admitting it).

Finally, I was intrigued by Kharitidi"s writing style. It is impeccable--no small achievement for a non-native speaker of English. I frequently got the impression that I was reading something written by Herman Melville or some other muscular, nineteenth-century prose stylist. Kharitidi's style is clean, spare, and non-intrusive, the result of writing psychiatric patient reports, perhaps? Anyway, it makes her account that much more convincing. This is a "bridge" sort of book, one that connects outdated conventional thinking to a whole new perceptual orientation. It is one to be treasured.
  • Nahelm
I saw this book recommended by a shaman author whose book I absolutely loved. Entering the Circle was initially riveting, beginning like a tightly woven novel with a first-person narrative. But there came a time about a third into the book where I found some aspects of the story hard to believe. In all the shaman books I've read, I've never doubted the author. I've gone to two shamans myself, so I am a believer. And I'm not necessarily saying this story is untrue, but I became incredibly alienated by the author and the story when...

SPOILERS

...the author and her sick friend go to a small village far away from civilization to see a healer. The author leaves her friend when she's being healed and comes back to find her in her under-clothes shackled to the wall of a cabin. It's explained as part of the shaman's remedy. The friend/patient agreed to suffer in order to heal and evidently being shackled in your underwear was part of it. If I found my friend alone in a strange village shackled to a wall in her underwear, I wouldn't leave her side the rest of the time I was there--but that wasn't an issue with the author. I could not follow the author's logic and rationale at many points thereafter.

The trance periods in which the author met with Other Side types and got the down low on existence and her future role, etc. were long and I found tedious.

I really wanted to love this book. I skimmed the last third. I didn't learn anything to help me on my journey. Maybe it's a cultural thing. Others will feel differently.
  • Ance
Entering the Circle is an autobiographical story about a Russian psychiatrist's entry into shamanism. Khartidi is an engaging story teller. Her descriptions of everything from riding a cold bus to the psych hospital to being on a trance journey to the spirit world were really vivid and entertaining. I have no knowledge of that part of the world, so I found that part interesting. Equally interesting were the every day tidbits about Russian life.

Of course the nitty gritty is the shamanism piece. The jury is out on whether or not I find all this part credible. There are an alarming amount of coincidences. Some things aren't clearly explained. It seems odd that Dr. Olga was basically initiated into shamanism, then just went back to her psychiatry work. Equally odd is that she makes a point of saying that shamans have a blood lineage, but makes no mention of hers. I don't know the first thing about shamanism, so I won't say that it's a fantasy. I think it's a huge risk for a psychiatrist to make such claims if there is nothing to back it up. What does she have to gain? I'm just saying I am not sure I am buying the story. It's really interesting and well told though.