almediah.fr
» » Rediscovering God With Transcendental Argument : A Contemporary Interpretation of Monistic Kashmiri Saiva Philosophy (Suny Series)

Download Rediscovering God With Transcendental Argument : A Contemporary Interpretation of Monistic Kashmiri Saiva Philosophy (Suny Series) eBook

by David Peter Lawrence

Download Rediscovering God With Transcendental Argument : A Contemporary Interpretation of Monistic Kashmiri Saiva Philosophy (Suny Series) eBook
ISBN:
0791440583
Author:
David Peter Lawrence
Category:
Religious Studies
Language:
English
Publisher:
SUNY Press (April 29, 1999)
Pages:
324 pages
EPUB book:
1721 kb
FB2 book:
1726 kb
DJVU:
1511 kb
Other formats
mbr docx mobi lrf
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
524


book by David Peter Lawrence.

book by David Peter Lawrence. Provides a comparative philosophical study of the thought of the two principle theorists of monistic Kashmiri Shaivism, Utpaladeva and Abhinavagupta, and also formulates a conception of the nature of philosophy as a means of intercultural and interreligious dialogue.

Bibliographic Details. Title: Rediscovering God With Transcendental. David Peter Lawrence is Assistant Professor in the Division of Humanities at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Publisher: State University of New York Press, 1999. Publication Date: 1999. The proprietors travel extensively and have bases both in the USA and the UK.

Start by marking Rediscovering God with Transcendental Argument: A Contemporary .

Start by marking Rediscovering God with Transcendental Argument: A Contemporary Interpretation of Monistic Kashmiri Saiva Philosophy as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Lawrence situates the Pratyabhijna speculation within the larger context of Hindu and Buddhist deliberations about the role of interpretation in experience, and gives a groundbreaking exposition of the epistemology and ontology of Shiva's self-recognition.

Transcendental Argument: A Contemporary Interpretation of Monistic Kashmiri Saiva Philosophy

Rediscovering God with Transcendental Argument: A Contemporary Interpretation of Monistic Kashmiri Saiva Philosophy. David Peter Lawrence.

David Peter Lawrence is Assistant Professor in the Division of Humanities at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Series: SUNY series, Toward a Comparative Philosophy of Religions. This philosophical school, which is the underlying philosophy of all Hindu tantra, represents a synthesis of the Indian philosophical traditions in the 10th century by two principle thinkers, Abhinavagupta and Utpaladeva.

Interpretation of Monistic Kashmiri Śaiva ing God with Transcendental Argument: A Contemporary Interpretation of Monistic Kashmiri Saiva Philosophy. Similar books and articles

Rediscovering God with Transcendental Argument: A Contemporary Interpretation of Monistic Kashmiri Śaiva ing God with Transcendental Argument: A Contemporary Interpretation of Monistic Kashmiri Saiva Philosophy. François Chenet, David Peter Lawrence & Francois Chenet. Journal of the American Oriental Society 121 (3):521 (2001). Similar books and articles. Rediscovering God with Transcendental Argument a Contemporary Interpretation of Monistic Kashmiri Saiva Philosophy.

Are you sure you want to remove Rediscovering God with transcendental argument . a contemporary interpretation of monistic Kashmiri Śaiva philosophy. SUNY series, toward a comparative philosophy of religions.

Are you sure you want to remove Rediscovering God with transcendental argument from your list? Rediscovering God with transcendental argument. Published 1999 by State University of New York Press in Albany, . Doctrines, Hindu Philosophy, Kashmir Śaivism, Philosophy, Hindu.

Rediscovering God with Transcendental Argument provides a comparative philosophical st of the Pratyabhijna system of the medieval Kashmir Saiva thinkers Utpaladeva Abhinavagupta

Rediscovering God with Transcendental Argument provides a comparative philosophical st of the Pratyabhijna system of the medieval Kashmir Saiva thinkers Utpaladeva Abhinavagupta. Beginning with intensive descriptive and prescriptive reflections on nature of philosophy itself, the book examines the special characteristics of the Pratyabh discourse as both philosophical apologetics and spiritual exercise

Lawrence DP (1999) Rediscovering god with transcendental argument: a contemporary interpretation of monistic Kashmiri Saiva philosophy. Veroffentlichungen zu den Sprachen und KulturenSudasiens series.

Lawrence DP (1999) Rediscovering god with transcendental argument: a contemporary interpretation of monistic Kashmiri Saiva philosophy. SUNY Press, Albany, NYGoogle Scholar. 8. Muller-Ortega PE (2010) Triadic heart of Siva, the: Kaula Tantricism of Abhinavagupta in the non-dual Shaivism of Kashmir. 9. Baumer B (2011) Abhinavagupta’s hermeneutics of the absolute: Anuttaraprakriya. Osterreichische Akademie der al Banarsidass, Wien/Varanasi, pp 491–505Google Scholar.

First, it is a superb contemporary exposition of the neglected Saiva theistic metaphysics of Utpaladeva (c. 9050) and Abhina~agupta (c. 975-1025)

First, it is a superb contemporary exposition of the neglected Saiva theistic metaphysics of Utpaladeva (c. 975-1025). Jose Pereira has called the Kashmiri Saiva thought of Abhinavagupta "the greatest and most consistent of the ty theologies.

Provides a comparative philosophical study of the thought of the two principle theorists of monistic Kashmiri Shaivism, Utpaladeva and Abhinavagupta, and also formulates a conception of the nature of philosophy as a means of intercultural and interreligious dialogue.
  • DEAD-SHOT
In this work, David Lawrence presents a comprehensive account of the tantric Saiva philosophical system known as Prayabhijna (“the Lord’s self-recognition”). This philosophical school, which is the underlying philosophy of all Hindu tantra, represents a synthesis of the Indian philosophical traditions in the 10th century by two principle thinkers, Abhinavagupta and Utpaladeva. The basic premise of this philosophy is the individual self’s identification with the supreme Lord or God, parama-Siva –“Liberation is nothing but the realization of one’s true self as Siva.” (28) The Hindu deity Siva is used as a personification of the principle of ultimate reality, universal consciousness, and of course the Hindu concept of transcendent reality known as Brahman. Against the Advaitin interpretation of Brahman as abstracted from the phenomenal world, the Saivas assert that it is in fact the reality of the world itself – that reality is always the self-recognition of Siva. This conception of reality is further divided into a triad of Siva (transcendent reality), Sakti (universal creative energy), and the Individual person, where all three in essence share an identity as Siva/God. (93)

Memory and language form important aspects of this philosophy, because these affect the way the world is perceived – i.e. both according to previously experienced events and in linguistic terms. Memory plays an especially important role in divine self-recognition because it is only through reflection and contemplation of one’s past, one’s memory, that one is able to recognize the entire process as being orchestrated by a divine power which is intimately identified with the process itself, as the substratum linking the disparate moments of one’s history to form a universal self-reflective pattern. To quote Abhinavagupta: “Memory itself, taking on the nature of contemplation (Dhyana), etc. is the wish-fulfilling gem which manifests your lordship.” (91) The implications of this are of course that every experience of recognition will be unique and idiosyncratic to the individual. Regarding language, there is a continuation of the ideas of the earlier grammarian philosopher Bhartrihari, who had formulated the idea of “Supreme Speech,” or a “superlinguistic principle” as the source and creator of multiform reality, making the world essentially linguistically structured (20). Lawrence draws apt comparisons here to the Christian idea of the Logos and to various idealistic philosophies.

Additionally, Lawrence details the responses of the Saivas to various objections by Buddhist thinkers, also active in Kasmir at the time of the Saivas, and other interpretations within the Hindu traditions. He also analyzes the structure of the Saiva religious-philosophical position as representing a panentheistic view, where God transcendent to the world is also immanent in the world, and draws comparisons to various recent iterations of this perspective, such as the process philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead, the religion scholar Mircea Eliade, Hegelianism, theological Heideggerianism, and the evolutionary cosmologies of Sri Aurobindo Ghose and Teilhard de Chardin. (169) The claims by the Saivas are decidedly nonrelativistic in that they make universal claims that they contends must be true for the world to exist in the manner we experience it, and Lawrence takes up this focus in his explication of their position, careful to discern issues of cross-cultural interpretation and mediating between closed universalist and relativist positions in “a process of dialogue” that constitutes the task of philosophy proper – “the effort to determine by rational argument what universal claims pertaining to experience, facts, morality, and even rationality, are truly universal,” in other words, “transcendental argument.” (11)
  • BORZOTA
Lawrence's dissertation-cum-published-book is certainly no casual read. That said, this is a marvelous contribution from a scholar who has devoted a career to the study of the medieval Indian Doctrine of Recognition (Pratyabhijna). He is adept at illustrating the relevance of this understudied theological tradition in modern and postmodern contexts. Though his articles appear online and in peer-review journals, such shorter studies tend to refer back to this important work. The Shaiva philosophical argument is 'denaturalized' and looked at in terms of its logical presentation, with insight from Christian methodologists such as David Tracy and Bernard Lonergan.
  • Onnell
if you like to know more about Transcendental arguments, this may not be the book you're after. it slips away from the classical theistic view of God as the transcendental source. perhaps the reader may look in other places; it seems not to be here.
The Critique of Pure ReasonKant: A Very Short Introduction