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Download 1001 Things Everyone Should Know About the Universe eBook

by William A. Gutsch Jr.

Download 1001 Things Everyone Should Know About the Universe eBook
ISBN:
038548223X
Author:
William A. Gutsch Jr.
Category:
Astronomy & Space Science
Language:
English
Publisher:
Doubleday; 1 edition (December 29, 1997)
Pages:
368 pages
EPUB book:
1702 kb
FB2 book:
1700 kb
DJVU:
1821 kb
Other formats
mobi doc azw lrf
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
774


Start by marking 1001 Things Everyone Should Know About the . Cut and dry book about the universe, at this point it's over ten years old so it's a little out of date.

Start by marking 1001 Things Everyone Should Know About the Universe as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

William A. Gutsch takes us on a delightful cruise through the universe, stopping at all the important sites. This may not be intended as "Our Universe For Dummies" but it has that same kind of clear presentation of the important facts and friendly, conversational tone. Do you have a young student in the house? Are you a student (young or old) of timely topics? Are you curious about our planet, solar system, galaxy, cosmic neighbors and universe? If so, this book is for you. It is your handbook, dictionary, and encyclopedia of the universe.

Actually, they are astronomical terms that are explained in "1001 Things Everyone Should Know About the .

Eminent astronomer Bill Gutsch takes the reader on a journey to explore the nebulous star clusters, probe the core of the nuclear furnace we call the sun, tour the distortions of time and space, and demystify 997 more amazing secrets of the cosmos.

Author: William A. Gutsch Jr. Format: Paperback. Publication Year: 1999. CU:1001 THINGS EVERY GRADUATE SHOULD KNOW By Harry H. Harrison Jr. BRAND NEW. 1001 Things Everyone Should Know About the Univers. 1001 Things Everyone Should Know About American History by John A. Garraty. 1001 Things Everyone Should Know about the Universe (ExLib). 1001 Things Everyone Should Know about the Universe by William A. Gutsch.

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Are you sure you want to remove 1001 things everyone should know about the universe from your list? 1001 things everyone should know about the universe. 1st ed. by William A. Published 1998 by Doubleday in New York. Miscellanea, Astronomy. One thousand and one things everyone should know about the universe, One thousand one things everyone should know about the universe.

Offers answers to common questions about the universe, covering . These are a few of the subjects "1001 Things Everyone Should Know About the Universe" will present in a fun, engaging and intelligent way.

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1001 Things You Should Know is a British game show that aired on Channel 4 from 12 November 2012 to 31 May 2013 and hosted by Sandi Toksvig. Three contestants compete in each show. They are offered a choice of 12 categories, and in each category, an expert (either a celebrity from a Channel 4 show or just a field expert) asks them a question, the answer of which it is thought people 'should know'.

Gutsch, William A. Jr. 1001 Things everyone should know about the universe. United States, Brooks/ Cole- Thompson Learning, c. 2002. New York, Doubleday,1998. 353 p. Thompson, Luke. New York, PowerKids Press, 2001. in the Library of Congress Online Catalog

White dwarves. Black dwarves. Red giants. Are these Disney characters? Actually, they are astronomical terms that are explained in 1001 Things Everyone Should Know About the Universe, the only source for a comprehensive and entertaining account of the stars and the sun, space exploration, and the Milky Way Galaxy. Eminent astronomer Bill Gutsch takes the reader on a journey to explore the nebulous star clusters, probe the core of the nuclear furnace we call the sun, tour the distortions of time and space, and demystify 997 more amazing secrets of the cosmos. Readers gain insight into how the galaxy evolved, and search its very heart where many believe there may lurk a monstrous black hole.Are there other beings that, like us, look up at the starry sky and wonder? 1001 Things Everyone Should Know About the Universe will ferret out the most likely places in space for life to exist, and reveal how scientists are actually trying to contact advanced extra-terrestrials.These are a few of the subjects 1001 Things Everyone Should Know About the Universe will present in a fun, engaging and intelligent way.
  • PC-rider
If you're looking for an indepth study of any of the topics, you probably want another book, but for a review of the basics, it's very good. A great book for younger readers developing an interest in astronomy.
  • Whitebinder
I learned a lot from this book. It is clearly written. It headlines the topic- sentence for each small entry and so gives the reader a chance to learn the main - point about the subject. It goes in a certain clear order. It tells us first what Astronomy is all about. It then gives a brief history of the subject. It then begins it survey of the universe with the Moon, and goes on to the Sun and then the Solar System. It continues to explore cosmic phenomena, comets,meteorites , asteroids, and then goes on to the stars, and then star - systems. It has a chapter on Cosmology and then concludes with the question of exploring for Extraterrestials.
It provides again basic information in a clear way.
Its attitude is upbeat and its tone is cheerful and informative.
I found this a bit disconcerting. Why? I am more in the company of Pascal 'The silence of these infinite spaces casts me into dread'. I note how vast, how violent the Universe is. I note the poignance of the human situation. We are as far as we know the only creatures in all this vastness who can claim a true higher intelligence and mind, a complex emotional life- our being created in the image of God. We are the only creatures capable of worshipping and dialoguing with God.
What one might wonder is all this superflous otherness for ?
  • Hellstaff
William A. Gutsch takes us on a delightful cruise through the universe, stopping at all the important sites.
This may not be intended as "Our Universe For Dummies" but it has that same kind of clear presentation of the important facts and friendly, conversational tone. Do you have a young student in the house? Are you a student (young or old) of timely topics? Are you curious about our planet, solar system, galaxy, cosmic neighbors and universe? If so, this book is for you. It is your handbook, dictionary, and encyclopedia of the universe.
Renew your acquaintance with our planetary neighbors, the sun, the moon, our galaxy, black holes, nebulas, red giants, white dwarfs, space dust and much more - all in this fun, easy to read book.
Have you ever wondered how often something happens if it's only once in a blue moon? Check page 54. What about those rogue asteroids taking aim on planet Earth - feel like it's time to learn more about them? There's a whole section on asteroids and their cousins. Do you know why the zodiac is just as important to astronomers as astrologers? You'll find the answers to this and lots of other tantalizing questions - all the way to the big question of extra-terrestrials and how we might reach out to them.
The strength of the book lies not only in the easy way in which you can zero in on a specific topic or question but also in the clarity and overall completeness of the survey. It's packed with easy-to-understand information. It does a superb job of being what it claims to be and therefore I don't think it has any real weakness.
Read and use the fifteen chapters of this book any way that you like: read it all at once, browse now and then, or research a specific question. Any way you do it is the right (and easy) way. Have a good trip!
  • Fani
My cousins gave me this book, and it took me a year to finally start reading it. When I did, it got me even more interesting in astromony that I already was. True, a few things are hard to understand. I mean who gets this: "Normally, atoms are said to be neutral because the number of positively charged protons in their nuclei are matched by the number of negatively charged electrons whirling about each nucleus."
But suppose you could understand that. This book is great. It is definitly NOT for children. Whoever wrote that must obviously a child themsevles because they have nothing better to say. (You can tell that by the length and words displayed in their review.) Don't let reviews stop you. Buy this book now if, espically if you have a strong interest in our universe and other ones out there. If you don't have an interest it will probably give you one, but then why would you buy it if you don't have an interest? Some of these facts include how we've sent signals into space to contact intelligent life, odd facts about the planets (such as how Mercury's day is longer than it year) and even things about Uranus's methane gas you thought you never knew! This is the best book alive. (Actually not.)
  • Garr
I am a science teacher and have recommended it to my teacher friends as a classroom resource. Astronomy can be a bit intimidating even for teachers! This covers EVERYTHING and makes the most difficult topics understandable. As a teacher and amateur astronomer, I've read many, many books on astronomy topics for my own enjoyment and for use in the classroom and have never found one so "reader friendly".
  • Antuiserum
Not just a year, but probably the REAL number of interesting facts there are in this book!!! If you even have a passing interest in astronomy, or even science in general, you must get and read this book. When you're done... keep it near by, and occasionaly thumb through it just for an amazing tid-bit of info which is at times beyond comprehension.....
  • Use_Death
this is one of the most books with explanations of the things which most people don't even consider