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Download First Signals: The Evolution of Multicellular Development. eBook

by John Tyler Bonner

Download First Signals: The Evolution of Multicellular Development. eBook
ISBN:
0691070385
Author:
John Tyler Bonner
Category:
Biological Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
Princeton University Press; 1 edition (January 23, 2001)
Pages:
156 pages
EPUB book:
1624 kb
FB2 book:
1804 kb
DJVU:
1539 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
547


To cut through this thicket, John Tyler Bonner ponders a moment in evolution when development was at its most basic-the .

To cut through this thicket, John Tyler Bonner ponders a moment in evolution when development was at its most basic-the moment when signaling between cells began. Students and scholars in the blossoming field of the evolution of development, as well as evolutionary biologists generally, will be interested in what Bonner has to say about the origins of multicellular development-and thus of the astounding biological complexity we now observe-and how best to study it.

As with all of Bonner's books, the writing is crisp and clear, even elegant, in the apparent effortless simplicity in which he. .Bonner offers a route to understanding the evolution of development in multicellular organisms

As with all of Bonner's books, the writing is crisp and clear, even elegant, in the apparent effortless simplicity in which he describes very complex issues. Bonner again combines an appreciation and deep understanding of the past with a vision of and for the future. -Brian K. Hall, Evolution and Development. Bonner offers a route to understanding the evolution of development in multicellular organisms. The route is really an old one, based on comparative methods, but Bonner shows how it is still relevant to solving some of the most fundamental and difficult problems in biology, in particular the origin of multicellularity.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading First Signals: The Evolution of Multicellular Development. As with all of Bonner's books, the writing is crisp and clear, even elegant, in the apparent effortless simplicity in which he describes very complex issues. Insightful aphorisms have been .feature of John Tyler Bonner's writing. Half a century later, it's a delight to find him. -Bernard Dixon, New Scientist.

Start by marking First Signals: The Evolution of Multicellular Development as Want to Read

Start by marking First Signals: The Evolution of Multicellular Development as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The evolution of signal-receptor systems helped the maintenance of the multicellular state by a process of integration.

Princeton University Press, 41 William Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, USA. 2000. 146 pp. Price: US$ 1. 5/£12. The evolution of signal-receptor systems helped the maintenance of the multicellular state by a process of integration. Subsequently, efficiency was achieved by cell differentiation, aided primarily by the polarity conferred by the environment. The multicellular organisms of today are the ones that have successfully gone through these processes several times in evolution.

Published by: Princeton University Press.

John Tyler Bonner is George M. Moffett Professor of Biology Ementus at Princeton University. His many books include Sixty Years in Biology. Essays on Evolution and Development, Life Cycles: Reflections of on Evolutionary Biologist. The Evolution of Complexity by Means of Natural Selection, and The Evolution of Culture in Animals (all Princeton). By: John Tyler Bonner. 146 pages, Bw illus, figs. Publisher: Princeton University Press.

John Tyler Bonner (May 12, 1920 – February 7, 2019) was an American biologist who was a professor in the . First Signals: The Evolution of Multicellular Development. John Tyler Bonner, Princeton University Press, February 15, 2001, ISBN 0-691-07038-5.

John Tyler Bonner (May 12, 1920 – February 7, 2019) was an American biologist who was a professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Princeton University. He was a pioneer in the use of cellular slime molds to understand evolution and development over a career of 40 years and was one of the world's leading experts on cellular slime. Arizona State University says that the establishment and growth of ionary biology owes a great debt to the work of Bonner’s studies.

by John Tyler Bonner. To cut through this thicket, John Tyler Bonner ponders a moment in evolution when development was at its most basic-the moment when signaling between cells began. Select Format: Hardcover.

The Evolution of Multicellular Development. Princeton university press. Although multicellularity arose numerous times, most of those events happened many millions of years ago. Many of the details of development that we see today, even in simple organisms, accrued over a long evolutionary timeline, and the initial events are obscured.

The enormous recent success of molecular developmental biology has yielded a vast amount of new information on the details of development. So much so that we risk losing sight of the underlying principles that apply to all development. To cut through this thicket, John Tyler Bonner ponders a moment in evolution when development was at its most basic--the moment when signaling between cells began. Although multicellularity arose numerous times, most of those events happened many millions of years ago. Many of the details of development that we see today, even in simple organisms, accrued over a long evolutionary timeline, and the initial events are obscured. The relatively uncomplicated and easy-to-grow cellular slime molds offer a unique opportunity to analyze development at a primitive stage and perhaps gain insight into how early multicellular development might have started.

Through slime molds, Bonner seeks a picture of the first elements of communication between cells. He asks what we have learned by looking at their developmental biology, including recent advances in our molecular understanding of the process. He then asks what is the most elementary way that polarity and pattern formation can be achieved. To find the answer, he uses models, including mathematical ones, to generate insights into how cell-to-cell cooperation might have originated. Students and scholars in the blossoming field of the evolution of development, as well as evolutionary biologists generally, will be interested in what Bonner has to say about the origins of multicellular development--and thus of the astounding biological complexity we now observe--and how best to study it.

  • Hiclerlsi
First signals: the evolution of the multicellular development - A slim but dense monograph by Prof. Bonner deals with one the most remarkable events of the biological evolution - the emergence and development of multicellular (complex) forms of life. Throughout the entire study, author explores and discusses with an admirable passion and simplicity the diversity of the multicellular organisms. Unlike the majority of studies on the evolution of the complex living systems, which confine both their emergence and development to the abyss of the chronology of our planet, the present analysis puts forward a view on the latter being immanent part of the ongoing stream of life, emphasizing that `at this very moment multicellularity is in the process of being invented by some single-cell forms'. The book is full of interesting ideas and unorthodox views, with the concept of the environment being structured into a series of size niches coming across (at least in my opinion) as the most controversial and provocative (and interesting). Finally, and importantly, from the point view of Neuroscience, the study makes an attempt to explain the process of the coordination of the development of complex multicellular systems throughout onto- and phylogeny. How did the cell-cell signaling arise, and how was it put to use to get an integrated development, from one generation to the next. For sure, one of the most important books that I have read.
  • Peras
Dr. Bonner writes in a way that all of us can understand. Early in my Biology education, I am able to understand everything he is explaining. I believe I have a pretty good grip on cellular slime molds at this point!
The signaling that goes on between different cells is just really cool. I totally enjoyed this book!