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Download The Vaccinators: Smallpox, Medical Knowledge, and the ‘Opening’ of Japan eBook

by Ann Jannetta

Download The Vaccinators: Smallpox, Medical Knowledge, and the ‘Opening’ of Japan eBook
ISBN:
0804754896
Author:
Ann Jannetta
Category:
Biological Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
Stanford University Press; 1 edition (May 23, 2007)
Pages:
264 pages
EPUB book:
1539 kb
FB2 book:
1121 kb
DJVU:
1228 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
923


The Vaccinators details the appalling cost of Japan's almost 300-year isolation and . Tracing its origins from rural England, Jannetta investigates the transmission of Jennerian vaccination to and throughout pre-Meiji Japan

The Vaccinators details the appalling cost of Japan's almost 300-year isolation and examines in depth a nation on the cusp of political and social upheaval. Tracing its origins from rural England, Jannetta investigates the transmission of Jennerian vaccination to and throughout pre-Meiji Japan. Relying on Dutch, Japanese, Russian, and English sources, the book treats Japanese physicians as leading agents of social and institutional change, showing how they used traditional strategies involving scholarship, marriage, and adoption to forge new local, national, and international networks in the first half of the nineteenth century.

The Vaccinators book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Vaccinators: Smallpox, Medical Knowledge, and the 'Opening' of Japan as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking The Vaccinators: Smallpox, Medical Knowledge, and the 'Opening' of Japan as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

But it is well chosen, because it raises curiosity and the reader will soon discover that it carries the central argument of the book: Physicians who adopted Dutch medical learning (Rangaku) and tried hard to introduce variolation and vaccination against smallpox into Japan-the ranpö physicians-at least after 1820 contributed decisively to intellectual, social, and political changes in the country.

Ann Jannetta is Professor of History Emerita at the University of Pittsburgh

Ann Jannetta is Professor of History Emerita at the University of Pittsburgh. Her publications include Epidemics and Mortality in Early Modern Japan and "Public Health and the Diffusion of Vaccination in Japan" in What Do We Know about Asian Population History? "Ann Jannetta has done a wonderful job of presenting not only the medical and political but also the artistic, intellectual, religious, and social context of the introduction of Jennerian vaccination to Japan.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Vaccinators: Smallpox, Medical Knowledge . In Japan, as late as the mid-nineteenth century, smallpox claimed the lives of an estimated twenty percent of all children born-most of them before the age of five.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Vaccinators: Smallpox, Medical Knowledge,. The Vaccinators: Smallpox, Medical Knowledge, and the "Opening" of Japan. When the apathetic Tokugawa shogunate failed to respond, Japanese physicians, learned in Western medicine and medical technology, became the primary disseminators of Jennerian vaccination-a new medical technology to prevent smallpox.

Ann Jannetta has done a wonderful job of presenting not only the medical and political but also the artistic, intellectual, religious, and social context of the introduction of Jennerian vaccination to Japan. The Vaccinators is a wonderful addition to the scholarly literature on the Dutch enclave in Japan, on nineteenth-century Japan, on the history of medicine in Japan, and on the history of the worldwide diffusion of vaccination. C. Michele Thompson East Asian Science, Technology and Medicine)

The Vaccinators examines Japan’s less dramatic opening to Western medical knowledge in the half-century before Perry’s arrival. It argues that Japanese physicians who were receptive to this knowledge strongly influenced the direction an open Japan would take

The Vaccinators examines Japan’s less dramatic opening to Western medical knowledge in the half-century before Perry’s arrival. It argues that Japanese physicians who were receptive to this knowledge strongly influenced the direction an open Japan would take. It focuses on the strategies of Japanese physicians who, in collaboration with Dutch merchants and influential Japanese patrons, forged a national network in support of Jennerian vaccination, a Western technology to prevent smallpox-Japan’s most devastating disease.

The Vaccinators: Smallpox, Medical Knowledge, and the ‘Opening’ of Japan. Chinese characters (kanji) for Japanese book titles and the names of institutions discussed in the text are provided in the glossary

The Vaccinators: Smallpox, Medical Knowledge, and the ‘Opening’ of Japan. Chinese characters (kanji) for Japanese book titles and the names of institutions discussed in the text are provided in the glossary. The names of Chinese authors and book titles use pinyin transliteration except when the author and title are commonly cited using a Wade-Giles transliteration. The Vaccinators is a book about connections.

Handle: RePEc:bla:revpol:v:25:y:2008:i:6:p:580-582. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Japan's modernization is unique, the only non-Western country to develop in the 19th century. This article by a Japanese historian describes the events from the US Navy’s black ships (1853) to the Meiji revolution (1868) to the new Meiji Constitution (1889). 85280. hyvert добавил(а), Samurai Archives raiarchives.

In Japan, as late as the mid-nineteenth century, smallpox claimed the lives of an estimated twenty percent of all children born―most of them before the age of five. When the apathetic Tokugawa shogunate failed to respond, Japanese physicians, learned in Western medicine and medical technology, became the primary disseminators of Jennerian vaccination―a new medical technology to prevent smallpox. Tracing its origins from rural England, Jannetta investigates the transmission of Jennerian vaccination to and throughout pre-Meiji Japan. Relying on Dutch, Japanese, Russian, and English sources, the book treats Japanese physicians as leading agents of social and institutional change, showing how they used traditional strategies involving scholarship, marriage, and adoption to forge new local, national, and international networks in the first half of the nineteenth century. The Vaccinators details the appalling cost of Japan's almost 300-year isolation and examines in depth a nation on the cusp of political and social upheaval.

  • Xwnaydan
It is so great to be able to buy books published overseas from my house sitting infront of PC.
I helped Anna Janetta to publish the book while she was in Japan collecting the evidences regarding Japanese smallpox vaccination;
  • Rolling Flipper
Historian Ann Janetta has taken the stories of the conquest of smallpox, one of the worst plagues of humanity until Edward Jenner invented vaccination, and the story of a nation living in splendid isolation, and woven the two into a fascinating tale. I was totally unaware of the way in which efforts to introduce cowpox into Japan (a frustratingly slow process) helped prepare that nation to vault onto the world stage following the Meiji restoration. This volume is more than a wonderful exercise in historical scholarship, as it should serve as a goldmine for those interested in cultural evolution. It reflects on such key topics as the importance of individuals and networks in promoting that evolution, as well as the promoting and retarding functions of institutions. It clearly shows, in the spirit of Montesquieu and Jared Diamond, the way features of the natural world -- in this case a highly lethal virus, a related virus that was difficult to transport, and a nation occupying an isolated archipelago -- can influence human affairs as much as any king or president. Besides being a gold mine for those interested in Japanese history or in understanding cultural evolution, it's just plain engrossing. Janetta has done us all a great favor.