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Download Brokers of Empire: Japanese Settler Colonialism in Korea, 1876–1945 (Harvard East Asian Monographs) eBook

by Jun Uchida

Download Brokers of Empire: Japanese Settler Colonialism in Korea, 1876–1945 (Harvard East Asian Monographs) eBook
ISBN:
0674062531
Author:
Jun Uchida
Category:
Earth Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
Harvard University Asia Center (December 19, 2011)
Pages:
500 pages
EPUB book:
1276 kb
FB2 book:
1944 kb
DJVU:
1154 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
163


He takes us from the very beginning starting with the 1876 Treaty of Kanghwa that opened Korea to Japanese trade and exchange. Brokers of Empire can be considered a landmark study of the Japanese administration of Korea.

He takes us from the very beginning starting with the 1876 Treaty of Kanghwa that opened Korea to Japanese trade and exchange. Since that time, Japanese began to Korea to settle and take advantage of the one sided opportunities granted by the treat. The author shows how the Japanese settlers and the Korean elites worked together to form a political bloc to administer the colonial territory. Between 1876-1945 tens of thousands of Japanese settlers arrived to call Korea their new home.

Harvard east asian monographs. Japanese Settler Colonialism in Korea, 1876–1945

Harvard east asian monographs. Harvard East Asian Monographs 337. Brokers of Empire. Japanese Settler Colonialism in Korea, 1876–1945. Brokers of Empire is an outstanding book, one that will be read and referenced for many years to come. Martin Dusinberre, Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History. Uchida’s history offers a wide-ranging treatment of the Japanese population that first flocked to the peninsula as part of Korea’s annexation and subsequently put down their roots as a privileged, if precarious, group of colonizing expatriates. path-breaking study.

Brokers of Empire book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Brokers of Empire: Japanese Settler Colonialism in Korea, 1876-1945 as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Brokers of Empire: Japanese Settler Colonialism in Korea, 1876-1945 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Between 1876 and 1945, thousands of Japanese civilians-merchants . The brokers of empire had multiple beginnings.

Between 1876 and 1945, thousands of Japanese civilians-merchants, traders, prostitutes, journalists, teachers, and adventurers-left their homeland for a new life on the Korean peninsula.

Harvard East Asian Monographs Series Citation: John Hennessey.

Harvard East Asian Monographs Series. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2011. Part 1 describes the emergence of Japanese settler colonialism in Korea from the 1870s up until the March First Movement of 1919, in which Koreans held mass demonstrations against Japanese rule. Citation: John Hennessey.

Although much of the response to the book was deservedly positive, both Duus himself and a number of the seminar participants remarked on its almost complete reliance on Japanese sources. It was, so to speak, a treatment of Japanese history that happened to be set in Korea.

Items related to Brokers of Empire: Japanese Settler Colonialism i. .Uchida, Jun Brokers of Empire: Japanese Settler Colonialism in Korea, 1876–1945 (Harvard East Asian Monographs). ISBN 13: 9780674492028. Uchida shows how Japanese settlers and Korean elites operated in a tense dynamic with one another, with the colonial state, and with the imperial metropole in a more complex choreography of colonial power than the conventional narrative admits. - Martin Dusinberre, Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History. Although most migrants were guided primarily by personal profit and only secondarily by national interest, their mundane lives and the state’s ambitions were inextricably entwined in the rise of imperial Japan.

Harvard University Asia Center, Cambridge, Mass. Although much of the response to the book was deservedly positive, both Duus himself and a number of the seminar participants remarked on its almost complete reliance on Japanese sources. Journals /. The Journal of Japanese Studies /.

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: In most postliberation writing on the colonial period, the dominant narrative .

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: In most postliberation writing on the colonial period, the dominant narrative has pitted a.For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit.

WINNER OF 2012 JOHN K. FAIRBANK PRIZE, AMERICAN HISTORICAL ASSOCIATIONWINNER OF 2012 PACIFIC COAST BRANCH BOOK AWARD, PACIFIC COAST BRANCH OF THE AMERICAN HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
  • Malara
Jun Uchida does a fine job of exploring an under exposed page of Modern Japan's history, a history that is very much a part of Modern Korea's as well. He takes us from the very beginning starting with the 1876 Treaty of Kanghwa that opened Korea to Japanese trade and exchange. Since that time, Japanese began to Korea to settle and take advantage of the one sided opportunities granted by the treat. As more and more Japanese came, the more power they amassed in their dealings with the Korean government first indirectly , then directly (with the assassination of Empress Myeonseong), and until finally coming to remove it with the annexation that came with the forcing of Emperor Gojong to sign over Korean sovereignty. In a short time period, the Resident-General became the Governor-General.

Uchida chronicles the Japanese settlers' struggle with the Japanese government in Tokyo to, at first , keep up with the basic support colonials needed from their metropole. Early on, the settlers were very much on their own in determining what was needed on an organizational level and spiritual one to be "Japanese" in Korea. Later on, as Japan put its self through a number of armed conflicts on its own march toward industrialization/modernization, Tokyo become too involved in its control over Korea (and the other colonies) in the eyes of the settlers who had been use the distance the center of the Empire had from Seoul before that point. Korea and the native Koreans were dragged into this industrialization/modernization with an even greater discomfort and sense dispossession as the roots of modern Korean nationalism began to take root at this time as well.

One of the many things that Uchida does well is illustrate the relationships between the Japanese settlers and the Koreans and how it evolved over time and how the two groups learned, benefited, and used each other. Much of what it means then (and I would say now as well) to be Japanese in the nationalistic sense was defined and outlined during this period in history as the settlers sought out ways to differentiate themselves from the (others) local Koreans and to give a purpose to their imperialism. As a reaction to this, Koreans did similarly in their calls for independence and in their steadfast hold and pride in their culture and traditions in the face of oppression. However, Uchida gives us many examples of the graying acts of mutual respect and cooperation as many groups among the two ethnicities desired Tokyo to leave Korea in the hands of just the people in Korea (albeit for different reasons) during the later years of the imperial period.

The best thing that this book does is give us another much needed look and thorough examination of Colonial Korea and the life of the Japanese in Korea and how they influenced the lives of Koreans. Much of what took place in Colonial Korea has informed and laid the foundation for the Korea(s) that we know during own era today. The same can be said Imperial Japan its its setters spread out over much of East Asia during the first half of the 1900s. Much of this history was been white washed out of books and records for many different reasons. Brokers of Empire gives us the opportunity to darken those pages that have been washed and remind us that (East Asian) history is not as black and white as many want it to appear to be.
  • Thohelm
Brokers of Empire can be considered a landmark study of the Japanese administration of Korea. The book is very detailed and well researched. The author shows how the Japanese settlers and the Korean elites worked together to form a political bloc to administer the colonial territory. Between 1876-1945 tens of thousands of Japanese settlers arrived to call Korea their new home. By the end of the Pacific War a million Japanese called it home. Many of the colonists originated from southwest Japan searching for farmland, commercial opportunity, and "elbow room". By 1940 nearly a quarter of Japanese in Korea were employed by the government, making the peninsula more attached to Japan than comparable European colonies to their colonies. The author iterates how the colonists concentrated on the commercial venues (36% of the settlers were engaged in commercial activity vs. 4% for agriculture) and truly modernized the colony by building railways, roads, and other infrastructure that it previously did not have. The settlers always seemed to be in the middle between what the Tokyo government wanted and how the realities in Korea really was. The annexation of Korea in 1910 led to the formation of the Governor-General administration. The first Governor was Terauchi Masatake, an individual who over his six years in office laid the foundations of the new state. A biographical chapter should have been written as it was for one of his successors, Saito Makoto. The personalities of the governors affected policy and implementation of laws since they were given so much autonomy by Tokyo. The programs that the colonial government set to help the Koreans ranged from education, medical help, and later on certain citizen rights. The settlers were the brokers of empire in the sense that they facilitated the dialogue between the disparate wants and needs of various groups such as nationalists (both Japanese and Korean) business groups, and later on the military. By the end of the book one wonders why so many settlers were "repatriated" to Japan when some had lived all their lives in the Korean territory. The historical facts of Japan's administration of Korea are presented and though this topic may be contentious for some, the author clearly shows the beneficial side that it brought. This book was purchased with the forethought that it seemed academic, was highly pleased that it is both academic and popular(general) history and can be read by anyone whether they are general readers of Asian history or students of Japanese studies. Six stars and HIGHLY recommended.
  • Mr_TrOlOlO
This is a dense read, but Uchida's examination of interactions between all parties involved in colonization and imperialism is an enlightening one.
  • Buzalas
Interesting book!