almediah.fr
» » Dry Valley Drilling Project (Antarctic Research Series)

Download Dry Valley Drilling Project (Antarctic Research Series) eBook

by Lyle D. McGinnis

Download Dry Valley Drilling Project (Antarctic Research Series) eBook
ISBN:
0875901778
Author:
Lyle D. McGinnis
Category:
Earth Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union; 1 edition (January 8, 1991)
Pages:
465 pages
EPUB book:
1755 kb
FB2 book:
1600 kb
DJVU:
1364 kb
Other formats
docx lit lrf txt
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
166


Project coordinators were D. Kear, L. McGinnis, T. Nagata, R. Thomson, T. Torii, and M. Turner.

Project coordinators were D. Project advisors were E. Barghoorn, P. Barrett, C. Bentley, R. Black, P. Damon, S. Goldich, H. Kurasawa, M. Murayama, N. Nakai, R. Roy, S. Treves, P. Webb, H. Wright, and Y. Yoshida.

PDF In 2007, the Antarctic Geological Drilling Program (ANDRILL) drilled 1138. 10 and 11, eastern Taylor Valley, in McGinnis, . 54 m of strata ̃10 km off the East Antarctic coast, includ ing an expanded early to middle Miocene succession not previously recovered from the Antarctic continental shelf. Series : Washington, . American Geophysical.

The McMurdo Dry Valleys are a row of largely snow-free valleys in Antarctica, located within Victoria Land west of McMurdo Sound. The Dry Valleys experience extremely low humidity and surrounding mountains prevent the flow of ice from nearby glaciers. The rocks here are granites and gneisses, and glacial tills dot this bedrock landscape, with loose gravel covering the ground.

In L. D. McGinnis (ed) Dry Valley Drilling Project. The role of the Dry Valley Drilling Project in antarctic and in international science policy. In L.

Dry Valley Drilling Project. The lithologic logs of DVDP cores 10 and 11, eastern Taylor Valley. In: McGinnis, L. e. Dry Valley Drilling Project. Elston, D. Robinson, P. H. and Bressler, S. L. 1981. Stratigraphy, sedimentology and palaeomagnetism of the Coral Ridge Sand Body, eastern Taylor Valley, Antarctica. Sedimentation conditions in Taylor Valley, Antarctica, inferred from textural analysis of DVDP cores.

Kennett and R. Houtz (Ed., Initial reports of the deep sea drilling project (Vol. 29).

American Geophysical Union. Limits of life and microbial extinction in the antarctic desert. Kennett and R. Washington, . Government Printing Office.

The team recently announced a new discovery of an ice anemone under the Ross Ice Shelf.

In Dry Valley Drilling Project, ed. 700 m (late Miocene-Pleistocene) of the AND-1B drillcore recovered D. McGinnis. from beneath the McMurdo Ice Shelf, Antarctica. In Antarctica: A American Geophysical Union

In Dry Valley Drilling Project, ed. In Antarctica: A American Geophysical Union.

Antarctica project - Lesson plans

Antarctica project - Lesson plans. The Dry Valleys region of Antarctica is one of the world's most extreme deserts, but that's only the start of its peculiarities. Where are the Dry Valleys in Antarctica? How big are they? The Dry Valleys are a very unusual part of Antarctica, they exist due to the positioning of the Transantarctic Mountain Range which force air flowing over them upwards so they lose their moisture, the valleys therefore are in a precipitation shadow (snow and rain doesn't fall).

Published by the American Geophysical Union as part of the Antarctic Research Series, Volume 33.Papers included in this volume represent final results of part of the research conducted under the auspices of the Dry Valley Drilling Project (DVDP), a coordinated effort by science groups from Japan, New Zealand, and the United States. Primary support for the project came from the U.S. National Science Foundation, Division of Polar Programs; the New Zealand Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, Antarctic Division; and the Japan National Institute of Polar Research. Responsibility for project operations included Japanese support of the Thiel Earth Science Laboratory at McMurdo, New Zealand's provision of drilling and other technical personnel at the drill sites, and the U.S. purchase of the drill rig and primary logistics such as helicopter airlift support and base shops at McMurdo, all staffed by U.S. Navy personnel and supported by the National Science Foundation. Project coordinators were D. Kear, L. McGinnis, T. Nagata, R. Thomson, T. Torii, and M. Turner. Project advisors were E. Barghoorn, P. Barrett, C. Bentley, R. Black, P. Damon, S. Goldich, H. Kurasawa, M. Murayama, N. Nakai, R. Roy, S. Treves, P. Webb, H. Wright, and Y. Yoshida. Some preliminary papers, as well as papers covering aspects of DVDP not in this volume, have already been published in scientific periodicals and in other volumes, such as the SCAR Symposium Transactions, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, and the proceedings volume of DVDP Seminar III held in Tokyo. Final reports of the efforts of U.S. scientists are included here, although final heat flow analyses and a synthesis of the geology of the dry valleys were not completed on time to appear on these pages.