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Download Quaternary Volcanism of Long Valley Caldera and Mono-Inyo Craters, Eastern California: Long Valley Caldera, California July 20 - 27, 1989 (Field Trip Guidebooks) eBook

by Roy A. Bailey,C. Dan Miller,Kerry Sieh

Download Quaternary Volcanism of Long Valley Caldera and Mono-Inyo Craters, Eastern California: Long Valley Caldera, California July 20 - 27, 1989 (Field Trip Guidebooks) eBook
ISBN:
0875906206
Author:
Roy A. Bailey,C. Dan Miller,Kerry Sieh
Category:
Earth Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union; 1 edition (January 8, 1991)
EPUB book:
1988 kb
FB2 book:
1267 kb
DJVU:
1121 kb
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615


Leaders: Roy A. Bailey from your list? . Leaders: Roy A. Bailey. Published by American Geophysical Union in Washington.

Leaders: Roy A. Bailey from your list? Quaternary volcanism of Long Valley Caldera and Mono-Inyo Craters, eastern California: Long Valley Caldera, California July 20-27, 1989.

Long Valley caldera, located at the boundary between the Sierra Nevada and the Basin and Range Province, is one of the largest Quaternary rhyolitic volcanic centers in North America. The elevation of the floor of the caldera is 6,500 feet (2,000 m) in the east and 8,500 feet (2600 m) in the west.

Inyo Craters, part of the Mono-Inyo Chain, Long Valley region, California. The Inyo Craters are three north-south-aligned phreatic (steam) explosion craters on the summit and south flank of Deer Mountain. Deer Mountain is an approximately 115,000-year-old rhyolite (high silica volcanic rock) dome in the west moat of the caldera that was erupted from the residual Long Valley Caldera magma. The two southernmost craters (informally designated as north crater and south crater) average about 200 m (660 ft) in diameter and are about 60 m (200 ft) deep.

Quaternary Volcanism of Long Valley Caldera and Mono-Inyo Craters, Eastern California: Long Valley Caldera .

Quaternary Volcanism of Long Valley Caldera and Mono-Inyo Craters, Eastern California: Long Valley Caldera, California July 20-27, 1989. T h e G r e a t Basin is bounded on t h e west by t h e Sierra Nevada (in California and Nevada) which will b e within view during days 2 t o 7, and on t h e east by a n uplifted a r e a expressed by t h e Wasatch Range (in Utah) which adjoins. t h e a r e a s visited on days 8 t o 10. The c l i m a t e in all of t h e s e a r e a s is arid t o semi-arid, promoting generally good exposures of rocks and sediments, but also causing warm t o hot s u m m e r days in t h e lower or even i n t e r m e.

A series of four magnitude -6 earthquakes in May 1980 called attention to this current episode of unrest, and subsequent activity has included numerous earthquake swarms in the south moat of the caldera accompanied by inflation of the resurgent dome by more than 50 cm over the last five years.

Long Valley Caldera is a depression in eastern California that is adjacent to Mammoth Mountain

Long Valley Caldera is a depression in eastern California that is adjacent to Mammoth Mountain. The valley is one of the Earth's largest calderas, measuring about 20 miles (32 km) long (east-west), 11 miles (18 km) wide (north-south), and up to 3,000 feet (910 m) deep. Long Valley was formed 760,000 years ago when a supervolcanic eruption released very hot ash that later cooled to form the Bishop tuff that is common to the area

Bailey The Inyo craters are the two largest of four phreatic craters that lie within a . -km long, 500- to 700-m wide N-S trend of faults an. .

The Long Valley Volcanic Field in east-central California straddles the East Sierran frontal fault zone, overlapping the Sierra Nevada and western Basin and Range Provinces. The density structure of Long Valley caldera and vicinity was modeled with 22 discrete density units, most of which were based on geologic units. Information from drill hole lithologies, surface geology, and structural geology interpretations constrain the model. The Inyo craters are the two largest of four phreatic craters that lie within a . -km long, 500- to 700-m wide N-S trend of faults and fissures at the south end of the Inyo volcanic chain in eastern California.

Anyway, on my last trip back from California, I flew from Sacramento across the Sierra . Image taken July 19, 2012 by Erik Klemetti from ~33,000 feet, 10 km.

Anyway, on my last trip back from California, I flew from Sacramento across the Sierra Nevada to Las Vegas. It was cloudy over the Sierra, but the clouds broke as we came out on the northern end of the Owens Valley, so I snapped a few shots with my iPhone of some of the great volcanic features that I saw from the ground earlier this year in the Long Valley caldera and Death Valley. Check 'em out: Long Valley Caldera, Mammoth Mountain and Inyo Domes, California. Bishop Tuff in the Owens Valley, California. filling much of the bottom of the valley.

Valley Caldera ; South Eastern California. Response plan for volcano hazards in the Long Valley Caldera and Mono Craters region, California.

Volcano Monitoring Techniques and their Implications for the Forecasting and Prediction of Current and Future Volcanism in the Long Valley Caldera ; South Eastern California. oceedings{, title {Volcano Monitoring Techniques and their Implications for the Forecasting and Prediction of Current and Future Volcanism in the Long Valley Caldera ; South Eastern California}, author {William Simmons}, year {2005} }. William Simmons.

Published by the American Geophysical Union as part of the Field Trip Guidebooks Series, Volume 313.Long Valley caldera (Fig. 1) is located at the western edge of the Basin and Range Province straddling the eastern frontal fault escarpment of the Sierra Nevada, in which it forms a reentrant or offset commonly referred to as the "Mammoth embayment." The floor of the caldera ranges in elevation from 2000m in its eastern half, where it is dominated by Lake Crowley and sage- and grass-covered Long Valley, to 2600 m in its western half, which is hillier and heavily forested. The caldera walls rise steeply to elevations of 3000-3500 m on all sides except the east and southeast, where the floor rises only 150 m before merging with the Volcanic Tableland at 2300 m elevation. The Mono-Inyo Craters volcanic chain extends from the western part of Long Valley caldera northward from Mammoth Mtn. to Mono Lake, a distance of 50 km. Although commonly described as subparallel to the Sierran front, the chain trends nearly due north at a noticeable angle to the northwest-trending Sierran faults (Figs. 1, 2). The prevolcanic basement in the area is mainly Mesozoic granitic rocks of the Sierra Nevada batholith and Paleozoic metasedimentary and Mesozoic metavolcanic rocks of the Mt. Morrison and Ritter Range roof pendants. The late Tertiary terrain upon which Long Valley volcanism was initiated was a maturely eroded upland drained by westward-flowing streams.