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by Constance Reid

Download A Long Way From Euclid eBook
ISBN:
1113808918
Author:
Constance Reid
Category:
Mathematics
Language:
English
Publisher:
BiblioBazaar (September 25, 2009)
Pages:
306 pages
EPUB book:
1194 kb
FB2 book:
1115 kb
DJVU:
1574 kb
Other formats
lit mobi doc docx
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
508


Constance Bowman Reid (January 3, 1918 – October 14, 2010) was the author of several biographies of mathematicians and popular books about mathematics. She received several awards for mathematical exposition.

Constance Bowman Reid (January 3, 1918 – October 14, 2010) was the author of several biographies of mathematicians and popular books about mathematics. She was not a mathematician but came from a mathematical family–her sister was Julia Robinson, and her brother-in-law was Raphael M. Robinson. Reid was born in St. Louis, Missouri, the daughter of Ralph Bowers Bowman and Helen (Hall) Bowman.

A Long Way from Euclid. Mathematics has come a long way indeed in the last 2,000 years, and this guide to modern mathematics traces the fascinating path from Euclid's Elements to contemporary concepts. No background beyond elementary algebra and plane geometry is necessary to understand and appreciate author Constance Reid's simple, direct explanations of the arithmetic of the infinite, the paradoxes of point sets, the "knotty" problems of topology, and "truth tables" of symbolic logic.

Constance Reid selected a fascinating series of mathematical topics to present to lay readers, tied together with the unifying thread of what Euclid pioneered

Constance Reid selected a fascinating series of mathematical topics to present to lay readers, tied together with the unifying thread of what Euclid pioneered. Her writing is lively, much of it is informative, and I would guess that this book, originally published in 1963 and now reprinted by Dover, has been widely read

A Long Way From Euclid. MILLION BOOKS ORIGINAL TIFF ZIP download.

A Long Way from Euclid book. Reid illustrates the ways in which the quandaries that arose from unsolvable problems promoted new ideas. Numerical concepts expanded to accommodate such concepts as zero, irrational numbers, negative numbers, imaginary numbers, and infinite numbers. Geometry advanced into the widening territories of projective geometry, non-Euclidean geometries, the geometry of n-dimensions, and topology or "rubber sheet" geometry.

Электронная книга "A Long Way from Euclid", Constance Reid

Электронная книга "A Long Way from Euclid", Constance Reid. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "A Long Way from Euclid" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Plato's statement that "God eternally geometrizes" is the theme of Constance Reid's book A Long Way From Euclid. Euclid is unquestionably our great model for logical thought. are the axioms for an argument modeled on Euclid's Elements. Given that this book is written for a general audience, the reader may wonder how much mathematics there is in it. Quite a bit actually

This lively guide by a prominent historian focuses on the role of Euclid's Elements in mathematical developments of the last 2,000 years.

This lively guide by a prominent historian focuses on the role of Euclid's Elements in mathematical developments of the last 2,000 years. No mathematical background beyond elementary algebra and plane geometry is necessary to appreciate the clear and simple explanations, which are augmented by more than 80 drawings. A Long Way from Euclid. Slacks and Calluses: Our Summer in a Bomber Factory. Riccati differential equations.

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. This text refers to the Bibliobazaar edition.
  • Broadraven
thanxs
  • Tygralbine
Each chapter is a combination meditation and explanation of a particular topic in the history of math. Many of the topics covered in the book are ones that receive very little coverage in high school. The writing is very clear, and easy to follow, though some of the mathematical language and symbols may require very careful reading in order to fully understand. I've been working through this book with my 5th grade daughter, and she is enjoying it a lot, though she has only the bare basics of algebra skill.

Some topics covered are:
Euclid's importance in the history of math
Descarte's importance in combining algebra and geometry
Non-Euclidean geometry
Projective geometry
A geometric explanation of limits, derivatives, and integrals
Why the square root of 2 is irrational
Imaginary numbers
Why squaring the circle is impossible (and why people have a hard time accepting that fact)
  • Ieslyaenn
It was very hard to get a copy of this book, and it cost me a ton of money. I do not regret this purchase in the least. If you have any interest in math (or if you don't you should read it and maybe you'll become interested) this book is incredible. I have reread it at least 10 times. It tries for nothing less than a story of the major advances in geometry from the greeks to the present. It is now a little out of date, (it says that Fermat's theorem is unproven) Constance Reid is such a good writer, that it does not matter. You should without a doubt try to get a copy of this book. Chapters 7, 9, 12 are exceptional.
  • HeonIc
Constance Reid selected a fascinating series of mathematical topics to present to lay readers, tied together with the unifying thread of what Euclid pioneered. Her writing is lively, much of it is informative, and I would guess that this book, originally published in 1963 and now reprinted by Dover, has been widely read.
It being understood that a popular book must necessarily slough over technicalities in order to convey general ideas, I am nevertheless shocked that Reid, with all her mathematical contacts, including her famous sister and brother-in-law (alive when she wrote this), did not have professional mathematicians check the correctness of what she wrote.
Here are a few inaccuracies I found:
p.60. "Their [Greek] geometry was based on an axiom which stated in essence that parallel lines never meet ..." (By definition, parallel lines are lines in the same plane that do not meet. No axiom is needed to guarantee that!)
p.152. "... the fifth postulate, which makes a statement very roughly equivalent to our common statement that parallel lines never meet."
p.136 Reid states falsely that Gauss was the first person in the history of mathematics to question the age-old assumption that the four classical constuction problems could be solved using straightedge and compass alone. Descartes, for one, preceded him.
p.157 "The true surface of hyperbolic geometry ... is what is called the pseudosphere, a world of two unending trumpets."
p.255 She states incorrectly that the domain of arithmetic presented by Hilbert in his Grundlagen is that of the constructible numbers. It is only a subfield of that.
p. 278 She states that elementary algebra is a decidable theory according to Tarski, without specifying (as she did for "elementary geometry") what that is. Ditto her statement that elementary arithmetic is decidable.
I was also disappointed that Reid hardly gave any references and has no bibliography. Surely many readers became interested in topics she presented and would wish to read more about them.
Reid still can fix these defects in a subsequent edition.
  • Dagdardana
I am always enthralled by Constance Reid's books.