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Download The Half-Life of Facts: Why Everything We Know Has an Expiration Date eBook

by Samuel Arbesman

Download The Half-Life of Facts: Why Everything We Know Has an Expiration Date eBook
ISBN:
159184651X
Author:
Samuel Arbesman
Category:
Mathematics
Language:
English
Publisher:
Current; Reprint edition (August 27, 2013)
Pages:
256 pages
EPUB book:
1912 kb
FB2 book:
1744 kb
DJVU:
1552 kb
Other formats
docx azw mobi mbr
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
307


The half-life of knowledge or half-life of facts is the amount of time that has to elapse before half of the knowledge or facts . Samuel Arbesman (2012). The Half-life of Facts: Why Everything We Know Has an Expiration Date. ISBN 978-1-59184-472-3.

The half-life of knowledge or half-life of facts is the amount of time that has to elapse before half of the knowledge or facts in a particular area is superseded or shown to be untrue. These coined terms belong to the field of quantitative analysis of science known as scientometrics. These ideas of half-life applied to different fields differ from the concept of half-life in physics in that there is no guarantee that the knowledge or facts in areas of study are declining exponentially.

'This book un¬ravels the mystery of how we come to know the truth - and how long we can be certain about i. ' . -Wall Street Journal. ' - -Nicholas A. Christakis, coauthor of Connected. 'The Half-Life of Facts is easily one of the best books of the year on science. -Stephen L. Carter, New York Times bestselling author. does what popular science should do - both engages and entertains.

The Half-life of Facts book. New insights from the science of science Facts change all the time. Smoking has gone from doctor recommended to deadly

The Half-life of Facts book. Smoking has gone from doctor recommended to deadly. We used to think the Earth was the center of the universe and that Pluto was a planet. For decades, we were convinced that the brontosaurus was a real dinosaur. In short, what we know about the world is constantly changing. But it turns out there’s an New insights from the science of science Facts change all the time.

The Half-life of Facts is a riveting journey into the counterintuitive fabric of knowledge. It can help us find new ways to measure the world while accepting the limits of how much we can know with certainty. Attn: Author/Narrator If you have any queries please contact me at info19782 @ gmail. I will reply as soon as possible, usually within 24 hours.

Электронная книга "The Half-Life of Facts: Why Everything We Know Has an Expiration Date", Samuel Arbesman. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Half-Life of Facts: Why Everything We Know Has an Expiration Date" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

In The Half-Life of Facts: why everything we know has an expiration date, Samuel Arbesman brings some clarity to our constantly changing factual landscape. It turns out that facts have a shelf-life, and that there is a mathematical predictability to that shelf-life. With an engaging style of storytelling, and just the right amount of graphs and tables, Arbesman walks us through the field of scientometrics, the scientific study of science itself. What do we learn? We learn that scientific studies themselves have half-lives. Press Tor says: October 10, 2012 at 1:57 PM.

Samuel Arbesman’s excellent new book The Half-life of Facts: Why Everything We Know Has an Expiration Date. The Half-life of Facts is a good read that help puts what we think we understand about the world into perspective

That’s the key message behind Samuel Arbesman’s excellent new book The Half-life of Facts: Why Everything We Know Has an Expiration Date. We’re bombarded with studies that seemingly prove this or that. Caffeine is good for you one day and bad for you the next. What we think we know and understand about the world is constantly changing. The Half-life of Facts is a good read that help puts what we think we understand about the world into perspective. Follow your curiosity and read my interview with the author. Knowing that knowledge has a half-life isn’t enough, we can use this to help us determine what to read.

Facts, in the aggregate, have half-lives: We can measure the amount of time for half of a subject’s knowledge to be overturned. There is science that explores the rates at which new facts are created, new technologies developed, and even how facts spread. How knowledge changes can be understood scientifically.

Facts change all the time. The Half-Life of Facts is a riveting journey into the counterintuitive fabric of knowledge.

Samuel Arbesman is a complexity scientist, whose work focuses on the nature of scientific and technological change. Facts change all the time. Smoking has gone from doctor-recommended to deadly. Release Date:September 2012. Publisher:Penguin Publishing Group.

book by Samuel Arbesman. It used to be thought the Earth was the centre of the universe and that Pluto was a planet. What is known about the world is constantly changing.

New insights from the science of science Facts change all the time. Smoking has gone from doctor recommended to deadly. We used to think the Earth was the center of the universe and that the brontosaurus was a real dinosaur. In short, what we know about the world is constantly changing. Samuel Arbesman shows us how knowledge in most fields evolves systematically and predictably, and how this evolution unfolds in a fascinating way that can have a powerful impact on our lives. He takes us through a wide variety of fields, including those that change quickly, over the course of a few years, or over the span of centuries.
  • IWantYou
I enjoyed this book and I believe it provides an important insight. It fits well with Thinking, fast and slow (Kahneman). The author starts with a deliberately fuzzy/loose pragmatic definition of "fact" and proceeds to explore the quantitative aspects of evolution (or temporal characteristics) of knowledge and information. He uses mathematical and statistical tools to explore patterns, suggesting common or universal mechanisms. In addition, the pitfalls and biases of dissemination of knowledge, the persistence of misinformation and the inertia for "changing our minds, when the facts change" are also explored.

I learned a lot from this book. However, I found the repetition of the statement underlying regularity not an argument. I felt that the underlying potential mechanisms that lead to these regularities were tantalizingly suggested but not explored. The patterns, which I agree we do not usually consider for information/knowledge, are important but I would have liked more discussion of types of growth, graph theory (metrics and their uses), self-organized criticality, data mining etc. These are all discussed and I accept that a taste of the "unreasonable effectiveness of Mathematics" in explaining the world rather than a Mathematical book per se. This is a minor point. It reflects more my expectations than anything else. I would have liked more plots demonstrating the relationships of interest but the tables and plots did merge well with the text.

Finally, I enjoyed the cover design of the dust jacket with "FACTS" created by particles with the particles disassembling and strewn on the rest of the jacket, much as sand being blown by the "winds of change", suggesting the fragile nature of facts. This was on the background of grid lines reminiscent of graph pads from school days: a reference to Mathematics facility for understanding these changes.
  • Ynap
It's a good idea about a true state of affairs, but maybe a trade book just can't do justice to this topic and the author's overarching hypotheses. It would take a tremendous amount of research and scholarship to support, or discard, Mr. Arbesman's hypotheses about the "facts" that society, especially "science," "knows." --Yes, that's a lot of scare quotes for the last third of one sentence, but that's what the book is, or needs to be, about: What are facts, and what does it mean to know them, and is science a privileged mode of knowledge, and if so, how, and why, and Where was I? But that last little jab, like this is such a confusing and tail-chasing epistemological tangle, isn't really deserved; Arbesman's book proceeds at a good clip through a kind of main-heading argument, buttressed by examples and representative citations.

Yet the book doesn't really deliver. Despite the exciting thesis, repeated in the opening paragraphs of numerous chapters, that the phenomena of exponential growth of facts and loss of facts in various fields of knowledge can be described precisely as mathematical models, what we end up with is more like those scientific findings so beloved, it seems, by the media. Researchers have found that (fill in the blank), which could lead to (fill in the blank). Alas, we seldom learn enough about such findings to know how to evaluate them; that would take much, much more effort on the reporting side than the story is worth to the publisher, and, of course, would demand much, much more of the reader than such a one would be prepared to invest in reading the newspaper or listening to the evening news. So out of a decent respect for an author whose scientific credentials are not negligible--but neither are they formidable--I will not severely criticize a work that most probably would never have seen the light of publication day, at least not outside of strictly academic publishing, had it been able to deliver much of what it promises.
  • Tygrafym
A mildly interesting book for a very short while, the content of which would better be presented in a magainze article.

Ever since I read Toeffler's "Future Shock" I have realized that there are some ideas so simple that they can be completely expressed in a sentence or two, but so grand that it takes a book-length treatment to make the impression they are entitled to. That book's central theme is the essence of simplicity--our world is changing so rapidly today that it is outpacing our ability to adapt. But putting the idea in a sentence denigrates it. It truly was worth a book. At least to me.

The idea of this book is equally simple; the things we take as facts may later be proven not to be true. And the author offers plenty of examples of how our understanding of things changes. How what seemed to be facts can be overturned. To me, at least, this is pretty obvious stuff. We are constantly bombarded with :"facts" which turn out not to be correct, and anyone who goes through life believing everything he hears is going to be in a lot of trouble.

But the problem is not that "facts" change--it is that we are too often offered theories of why things are or happen, and these theories are too often presented as "facts." The pre-Copernican view of the solar system they knew was never a fact--it was an effort to jam all of the known facts into a theory attempting to rationalize all of the facts about the universe that were known at the time.

And today is not that much better than 1500. The people who are supposed to know these things have announced that the entire universe originated with a "Big Bang" some billions of years ago. Perhaps. But that surely is not a fact. It is a theory; a conjecture. One which, incidentally, remqarkably like the conjectures of the Ancient Greek Atomists. Over time, the theory will be constantly tested as new facts are learned. Perhaps it will survive. The history of ideas suggests that it will not.

There are more productive ways to spend one's time than plowing through this book. That's not a fact--it's a theory.

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