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Download Fathoming the Ocean: The Discovery and Exploration of the Deep Sea eBook

by Sylvia Earle,Helen M. Rozwadowski

Download Fathoming the Ocean: The Discovery and Exploration of the Deep Sea eBook
ISBN:
0674027566
Author:
Sylvia Earle,Helen M. Rozwadowski
Category:
Nature & Ecology
Language:
English
Publisher:
Belknap Press (March 31, 2008)
Pages:
304 pages
EPUB book:
1965 kb
FB2 book:
1351 kb
DJVU:
1987 kb
Other formats
lit mbr azw lrf
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
258


Fathoming the Ocean by Helen Rozwadowski chronicles the birth of deep-sea oceanography, from early observations by Benjamin Franklin to the voyage of HMS Challenger in the 1870s. She weaves a rich narrative from the world of renowned as well as lesser-known oceanographers.

Fathoming the Ocean by Helen Rozwadowski chronicles the birth of deep-sea oceanography, from early observations by Benjamin Franklin to the voyage of HMS Challenger in the 1870s. Jon Copley Nature 2005-05-19). Fathoming the Ocean will clearly be welcomed as a serious contribution by historians of science, technology, and maritime culture.

Helen M. Rozwadowski is Assistant Professor of History and Coordinator . In the same year, their book Exploring the Deep Frontier appeared. Rozwadowski is Assistant Professor of History and Coordinator of Maritime Studies, University of Connecticut at Avery Point. Sylvia Earle can lay claim to the titles marine botanist, environmentalist, businesswoman, writer, and deep-sea explorer. Of them all, the last is perhaps the one that most captures the imagination. She has spent more than 6,000 hours (over seven months) underwater. In 1979, she attached herself to a submarine that took her, at times as fast as 100 feet per minute, to the ocean floor 1,250 feet below. It includes a discussion of the "Jim dive.

Fathoming the Ocean offers a rare and engaging look into our fascination with the deep sea and into the origins .

Fathoming the Ocean offers a rare and engaging look into our fascination with the deep sea and into the origins of still visible in a science that focuses the efforts of physicists, chemists, geologists, biologists, and engineers on the common enterprise of understanding a vast, three-dimensional, alien space. Foreword by Sylvia Earle 1. Fathoming the Fathomless 2. The Undiscovered Country 3. Soundings 4. A Sea Breeze 5. Dredging the Moon 6. Small World 7. Epilogue Notes Acknowledgments Index.

1. 5 (hardback) Some habitats such as the deep sea may be an ultimate sink for the accumulation of plastic debris at sea; indeed, some recent evidence indicates quantities in the deep sea ca. .

Helen M. Rozwadowski and David K. van Keuren (ed., The Machine in Neptune's Garden: Historical Perspectives on Technology and the Marine Environment. Sagamore Beach, CA: Science History Publications, 2004. Some habitats such as the deep sea may be an ultimate sink for the accumulation of plastic debris at sea; indeed, some recent evidence indicates quantities in the deep sea can be greater than at the sea surface.

Scientists Go To Sea. Helen Rozwadowski focuses a sophisticated historian's eye on how the modern science of oceanography . Citation: Harold Burstyn. Helen Rozwadowski focuses a sophisticated historian's eye on how the modern science of oceanography began, in Britain and the United States, in the nineteenth century. Captain James Cook's voyages in the eighteenth century joined what we now call science to seafaring.

Mobile version (beta). Fathoming the Ocean: The Discovery and Exploration of the Deep Sea. Helen M. Rozwadowski. Download (pdf, . 5 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Harvard University Press, Jun 30, 2009 - Science - 292 pages. The history of how this changed-of how the depths became a scientific passion and a cultural obsession, an engineering challenge and a political attraction-is the story that unfolds in Fathoming the Ocean.

Fathoming the Ocean book. In a history at once scientific and cultural, Helen Rozwadowski shows us how the Western imagination awoke to the ocean's possibilities-in maritime novels, in the popular hobby of marine biology, in the youthful sport of yachting, and in the laying of a trans-Atlantic telegraph cable.

Foreword by Sylvia Earle 1. A Sea Breeze . Rozwadowski is Assistant Professor of History and Coodinator of Maritime Studies, University of Connecticut at Avery Point. By: Helen M Rozwadowski. 276 pages, b/w photos, b/w illustrations. Publisher: Harvard University Press.

Harvard University Press, 30 Haz 2009 - 292 sayfa

Harvard University Press, 30 Haz 2009 - 292 sayfa. Bu kitaba önizleme yap . Kullanıcılar ne diyor?

By the middle of the nineteenth century, as scientists explored the frontiers of polar regions and the atmosphere, the ocean remained silent and inaccessible. The history of how this changed―of how the depths became a scientific passion and a cultural obsession, an engineering challenge and a political attraction―is the story that unfolds in Fathoming the Ocean.

In a history at once scientific and cultural, Helen Rozwadowski shows us how the Western imagination awoke to the ocean's possibilities―in maritime novels, in the popular hobby of marine biology, in the youthful sport of yachting, and in the laying of a trans-Atlantic telegraph cable. The ocean emerged as important new territory, and scientific interests intersected with those of merchant-industrialists and politicians. Rozwadowski documents the popular crazes that coincided with these interests―from children's sailor suits to the home aquarium and the surge in ocean travel. She describes how, beginning in the 1860s, oceanography moved from yachts onto the decks of oceangoing vessels, and landlubber naturalists found themselves navigating the routines of a working ship's physical and social structures.

Fathoming the Ocean offers a rare and engaging look into our fascination with the deep sea and into the origins of oceanography―origins still visible in a science that focuses the efforts of physicists, chemists, geologists, biologists, and engineers on the common enterprise of understanding a vast, three-dimensional, alien space.

  • Ustamya
This book will be extremely helpful to university professors and teachers in literature or science studies who want to introduce students to topics in the study of the ocean. I'm very satisfied with the cogent overview of ocean exploration this book gives, but....

...be warned, the kindle version does not have pictures that work and you also cannot access the footnotes while reading. This really upsets me, and I'm considering returning the kindle edition for a refund.
  • Dorintrius
I had to borrow this from the library twice to finish it. I can see why I didn't the first time around. While I liked her writing and found the subject interesting at times (particularly the part about shipboard life for scientists), I was often extremely bored and forced to put this down multiple times to do something else. She spent way too much time talking about just gosh-darn dredging. I understood that she would include that going in but I didn't think she'd spend so much time on it. The dozen times or so she actually mentions what they discovered she typically just lists the phyla of animals found. She mentions the names of genera a couple times and even named two species (though one of the two was Bathybius haeckelii). She'll briefly state how some dredger found a living fossil or a new kind of animal but then doesn't bother tell you what they discovered. What's the point of even telling us that? I found that very frustrating. I think she had to resort to this because she doesn't know much of anything about marine life to begin with (a problem I've noticed among historians writing about the sea). She evidently thinks brittle stars are a genus of starfish or that starfish or a genus of brittle star (it was so poorly worded I couldn't tell which). She lists that one dredge found a worm of the genus Serpula as well as an annelid, even though the former ARE annelids (no italics, sorry). I don't think anyone bothered to edit this either. How do you not notice "of of" and "the the" (twice) when they're on the very same line or misspell a word when it's correctly spelled RIGHT below it? That's just sheer laziness.

The book does at least include a number of black-and-white illustrations, extensive end-notes, and an index. I took two stars away for the long boring passages, poor fact checking, and lazy editing. Don't bother with this unless you're really into reading about people digging stuff up and then learning almost nothing about what they discover. She should have given this book a completely different title: "The History of Playing in Mud".
  • Shem
We all know modern tools are allowing us to get a better view of the deep seas than we’ve ever had, but how did that kind of exploration get started? How did humans first get interested in the word below the first few sunlit meters of the sea, and how did we start exploring that world? Rozwadowski, in the first book I’ve read devoted to the early ocean surveyors, shows us how the Age of Sail fostered the age of deep-sea exploration. As ocean commerce, whaling, fishing, and travel grew in economic importance and matured from coastal to trans-oceanic pursuits, naturalists, professional and amateur, grew more interested in the depths. These men tried a number of modifications of fishing nets and trawls for this work, then added purpose-built, often very ingenious tools like water samplers and core samplers. In England and the United States, especially, wealthy and then middle-class amateurs took up the new interest in sampling and describing ocean fauna, followed increasingly by government-sponsored professionals, which led to episodes like the fortunate inclusion of Charles Darwin on the HMS Beagle, not to mention the epic voyage of the HMS Challenger (1872-76), which is often called the beginning of the modern age of ocean exploration. In this superbly documented and referenced book, the author includes the views of governments, ordinary sailors, and the Western public along with those of scientists. This is an essential book for the understanding of deep-sea exploration, both historical and modern.

Matt Bille, author, Shadows of Existence: Discoveries and Speculations in Zoology (Hancock, 2006)
www.mattwriter.com