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Download Wildwood: a Journey Through Trees eBook

by Roger Deakin

Download Wildwood: a Journey Through Trees eBook
ISBN:
0241141842
Author:
Roger Deakin
Category:
Nature & Ecology
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hamish Hamilton for Penguin; First Edition/Third Printing edition (2007)
Pages:
416 pages
EPUB book:
1712 kb
FB2 book:
1151 kb
DJVU:
1787 kb
Other formats
docx rtf mbr azw
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
567


Roger Deakin's Wildwood is a much loved classic of nature writing From the walnut tree at his Suffolk home, Roger Deakin embarks upon a quest that takes him through Britain.

Roger Deakin's Wildwood is a much loved classic of nature writing. Wildwood is about the element wood, as it exists in nature, in our souls, in our culture and our lives.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Here, published for the first time in the United States, is the last book by Roger Deakin, famed British nature writer and icon of the environmentalist movement.

Wildwood: a Journey Through Trees. ISBN 13: 9780241141847. Deakin lives in forest shacks, goes "coppicing" in Suffolk, swims beneath the walnut trees of the Haut-Languedoc, and hunts bushplums with Aboriginal women in the outback. As the world's forests are whittled away, Deakin's sparkling prose evokes woodlands anarchic with life, rendering each tree as an individual, living being.

Won't someone please, perhaps his friend Robert MacFarlane, go through Deakins papers so this book won't have to be his last? Another excellent book going undeservedly undernoticed and unsung. Believe it or not one of the best chapters is "Among Jaguars"-a chapter on automobiles in a book about trees; I squeal with delight! Find out a great deal about cricket bats and eel traps, and the Green Man, among other fascinating things. This book was a natural progression for the most rooted of writers

Wildwood: A Journey Through Trees. Hamish Hamilton £20, pp392. Shortly after he completed Wildwood, Roger Deakin, at 63, was diagnosed with a brain tumour. He died four months later, in August 2006. This book was a natural progression for the most rooted of writers. Following his aquatic journey across the Britain of 1996, Waterlog, in which he plunged into lakes and tarns and pools and rivers and evoked the special magic of each, Deakin conceived of this as another kind of log book, a total immersion in the 'fifth element', the world of wood.

Roger Deakin was a writer, broadcaster and film-maker with a particular interest in nature and the .

Roger Deakin was a writer, broadcaster and film-maker with a particular interest in nature and the environment. He completed the manuscript for Wildwood, his second book, just before he died in 2006. As the sub-title explains it's about Deakin's journeys through a wide variety of trees and woods in various parts of the world.

Home Outdoor Supplies Books Flora. Wildwood A Journey Through Trees by Roger Deakin. View all products by Roger Deakin. Wildwood is a remarkable celebration of the transforming magic of trees, exploring the 'fifth element' of wood as it exists in nature, in our souls, in our culture and our lives.

Deakin's book Wildwood appeared posthumously in 2007. Wildwood: A Journey Through Trees. Hamish Hamilton Ltd. ISBN 0-241-14184-2. It describes a series of journeys across the globe that Deakin made to meet people whose lives are intimately connected to trees and wood. In November 2008, Notes from Walnut Tree Farm was published to high critical appraisal  .

Wildwood takes the form of an extended ramble, beginning in the New Forest where Deakin recalls his earliest forays . More than that still, it's about what the trees symbolise

Wildwood takes the form of an extended ramble, beginning in the New Forest where Deakin recalls his earliest forays into botany as a schoolboy, detailing all the different plants he and his friends could find while crawling on their hands and knees over small patches of ground: "Some of our projects. in Gulliver's Travels. This isn't simply a book about trees; it's about how you can learn to look closely at life. More than that still, it's about what the trees symbolise.

Wildwood: a Journey Through Trees
  • Zargelynd
In the very early goings of this book (p.9), author Deakin, in describing the "bothy" that his father built for him as a lad when he was about six, writes: "Thoreau would have approved of the name we gave it: `Cosy Cabin' emblazoned on a tin sign above the door." Would he have indeed? Readers familiar with Thoreau know that there is nothing at all "cosy" about him and his writing. Sorry, but Deakin is not anywhere near a modern Thoreau, more like an anti-Thoreau in point of fact - despite "professional" reviewers claims to the contrary and the fact that Thoreau is the writer whose name is most often invoked by Deakin. Thoreau was a misanthrope. Deakin loves company. Deakin delights in the wild, open spaces - once he departs England where - to be blunt - they don't exist. Thoreau spent a night in gaol because, in part, of his objection to The Mexican War and proffers a deep, meditation on that institution in "On the Duty of Civil Disobedience." Deakin visits a woodworking family and watches the Iraq war on the telly. But the essential difference, why Walden is great literature and Wildwood is not, is that Walden is filled with deep introspective insights that resonate with any poetic reader, whether he or she lives in town or country. Wildwood is stuffed with very interesting information: about trees and old customs and folkways of all sorts, woodworking, moths, walnuts, the "ur-apple," and on and on. At the end of Walden, the similarly attuned reader feels he knows Thoreau's heart and soul. At the end of Wildwood, I don't feel I know anything about Deakin at all, except that he liked trees and liked to hang around with people who liked trees as well.

There are some worthwhile things here: "The Moth Wood" chapter is surely the most entrancing of the book. But, essentially, this book is best described as a chummy eco-tour of certain places and their flora and fauna. If this is all you wish from the book, it will not disappoint. If you're searching for something more profound, keep searching or perhaps re-read Walden; though from the few reviews here, I have a suspicion that none of the readers have read Walden in the first place.

The last lines from Robert Frost's poem, "A Tree at My Window" kept recurring to me whilst reading this rambling account:

"That day she put our heads together,
Fate had her imagination about her,
Your head so much concerned with outer,
Mine with inner, weather."

Deakin's head is very much concerned with outer weather.
  • Drelajurus
These essays are delightful and span this man's life experience in woods around the world, but mostly in his homeland of England. A book you pick up and put down easily since most of the essays are short.
  • Trash Obsession
Won't someone please, perhaps his friend Robert MacFarlane, go through Deakins papers so this book won't have to be his last?
Another excellent book going undeservedly undernoticed and unsung. Believe it or not one of the best chapters is "Among Jaguars"-a chapter on automobiles in a book about trees; I squeal with delight! Find out a great deal about cricket bats and eel traps, and the Green Man, among other fascinating things.
Squeezing himself inside a hollow thousand year old holly, full of holes and decay: "Yet the tree was in full foliage and blackbirds were sampling the first of its ripe pink berries."
A book to be savored...
  • Leyl
My husband said, "Read this book,you will love it." He could not have been more right. I do not know when I have read a book I loved more than this journey around the world of trees. Having grown up in the Midwest, in a little Iowa town full of maple trees and river bottoms, I was so at home in this book I cried when I read the last page. I travel in Britain, particularly Wales, when I can, and have been in some of the ancient groves. I once walked a footpath through the woods near Stackpole, and got so thoroughly lost that when I emerged on a road hours later, it was a terrible shock. I had been in the world of trees. Deakin took me back to that place so thoroughly, that one night at about 3:00 I stopped reading and was surprised to find myself on my couch in front of the fire, I had been so immersed in the walnut trees of Kyrgystan. Roger Deakin is no longer on this earth, but these works of his will endure in the genre of nature writing forever.
  • Hidden Winter
I think the books and writing of the late Roger Deakin are all marvellous. Loved Wildwood, loved Notes from Walnut Tree Farm, loved Waterlog: so sad that he has died at a relatively early age. Sadly, for readers who care about the natural environment, he will write no more.
  • Efmprof
Very poetic book on Nature.
  • Welen
Deakin does a wonderful job to change our perspective on an essential part of the natural world. Full of heart (and craft), highly intelligent, sometimes slow going but ultimately unforgettable.
This is a book I will reread, probably more than once. I particularly liked the part about England, life in the country, and visiting artists. If I were visiting central Asia, I would be more interested in the journey to the wild apple forest.