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by David Park

Download The Fire within the Eye eBook
ISBN:
0691043329
Author:
David Park
Category:
Physics
Language:
English
Publisher:
Princeton University Press (May 23, 1997)
Pages:
550 pages
EPUB book:
1702 kb
FB2 book:
1570 kb
DJVU:
1842 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
777


The Fire Within is a 2001 children's fantasy novel written by Chris d'Lacey. It is the first novel of The Last Dragon Chronicles, a low fantasy series about dragons in the modern world.

The Fire Within is a 2001 children's fantasy novel written by Chris d'Lacey. The series continues with Icefire, Fire Star, The Fire Eternal, Dark Fire, Fire World, and The Fire Ascending. The Fire Within takes place at Wayward Crescent, and it is about a 20-year-old man named David Rain, who tries to find out the mystery behind Liz and Lucy Pennykettle's relationship with dragons.

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Physicist David Park covers all the bases in The Fire Within the Eye, his fascinating exploration of the history .

Physicist David Park covers all the bases in The Fire Within the Eye, his fascinating exploration of the history of light.

Start by marking The Fire within the Eye: A Historical Essay .

Start by marking The Fire within the Eye: A Historical Essay on the Nature and Meaning of Light as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Park, who is both a gifted teacher and physicist, takes us on a tour through history spanning ancient Greek, Neoplatoni In The Fire within the Eye, scientist and author David Park helps us reconceive the everyday phenomenon of light in profound ways, from spiritual meanings embedded in our culture to the challenging questions put forth by great scientists and philosophers.

David Park's passion for science and the history of his topic comes across on every page and is infectious. That line is a fitting tribute to this 1997 book, The Fire Within The Eye (and his 1974 undergraduate-level textbook, Introduction To The Quantum Theory). Greek, early modern, and modern science come alive in a book full of delightful information.

Similar books and articles Fire Within the Eye By David A. Park. David Frawley - 2004 - Lotus Press. The Character of Inquiry and the Meaning of Subject Matter Implied in Dewey's View of Nature

Similar books and articles. The Fire Within the Eye: A Historical Essay on the Nature and Meaning of Light by David Park. Antoni Malet - 1998 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 89:520-521. Black Fire on White Fire an Essay on Jewish Hermeneutics, From Midrash to Kabbalah. Betty Rojtman - 1998. Fire Within the Eye By David A. Saras Ramanethan - 1999 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 42 (3):444-447. The Character of Inquiry and the Meaning of Subject Matter Implied in Dewey's View of Nature. Chul-Hong Park - 2013 - The Journal of Moral Education 25 (3):19. On Fire in Heraclitus and in Zeno of Citium.

The Grand Contraption: The World as Myth, Number, and Chance by Park, David (2007) Paperback.

Fellow American Physical Society; member International Society for Study Time (president 1973-1976). This book is about the 'grand contraption' we've constructed through the ages in an effort to understand and identify with the universe. VYTAA/?tag prabook0b-20. The Fire within the Eye by Park, David (1997) Hardcover. The Grand Contraption: The World as Myth, Number, and Chance by Park, David (2007) Paperback. 2MAJM/?tag prabook0b-20.

David Park," Isis 89, no. 3 (Se. 1998): 520-521. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months.

The Fire within the Eye: A Historical Essay on the Nature and Meaning of Light. David Park," Isis 89, no. The History of Medicine and the Scientific Revolution. Translating History of Science Books into Chinese: Why?

MARCH GOES OUT I thought I saw the Grey Wolf's eyes. The sun was gone away, Most unendurably gone down, With all delights of day.

MARCH GOES OUT I thought I saw the Grey Wolf's eyes one away, And no one answered to my call. EDWARD was, perhaps, the person best pleased at the news of Elizabeth's engagement. He had been, as Mary phrased it, very much put ou. .Put out, in fact, to the point of wondering whether he could possibly nerve himself to tell David that he came too often to the house.

Light on the Subject, David Hayes. The Fire within the Eye, David Park. Princeton University Press 1997. Conceptual Blockbusting, A Guide to Better Ideas, James L. Adams, Perseus Books. The Magic of Light, Jean Rosenthal & Lael Wortenbaker. Published by Little Brown & Co. 1972. Mariano Fortuny, Guillermo de Osoma.

In The Fire within the Eye, scientist and author David Park helps us reconceive the everyday phenomenon of light in profound ways, from spiritual meanings embedded in our culture to the challenging questions put forth by great scientists and philosophers. Park, who is both a gifted teacher and physicist, takes us on a tour through history spanning ancient Greek, Neoplatonic, and Arabic philosophy together with astrology, the metaphysics of Galileo and Kepler, and the role of mathematics and experimentation in modern physics. By creatively synthesizing a broad sweep of historical events and intellectual movements around the theme of light, the author offers readers of all backgrounds a unique perspective on Western civilization itself. Readers will find themselves immersed in lively discussions conducted by a physicist equally at home exploring the invention of perspective by Brunelleschi and Alberti, the writings of Goethe, or the mathematical models inspiring Maxwell's electromagnetic theory.

Plato made light the earthly counterpart of the Good; the early Christians believed the command "Let there be light" unleashed a power that shaped and energized the world. Park follows the connotations of spirituality and power attributed to light in religion, philosophy, art, and literature. At the same time he enables us truly to feel the excitement surrounding scientific discoveries and debates about the nature of light throughout history --Isaac Newton's scientific explanation of color and the raging battles between proponents of light as particles and light as a wave. Park traces the attempts to define light, beginning in the nineteenth century with the proposal that light is a wave motion in a field that unites electricity and magnetism. How this theory was reconciled with the particle theory of light is one of many paradoxes that Park guides us in understanding.

Park writes eloquently of the physical, aesthetic, and spiritual aspects of light, making this book an invaluable guide for all readers wishing to explore the fascinating relationship between science and culture.

  • Duzshura
The subtitle of Prof. Park's book is "A historical Essay on the Nature and Meaning of Light." That promise is faithfully kept in a thorough, erudite, and entertaining narrative. Park, a physicist, seems equally at home as historian, philosopher and classicist. Paying meticulous attention to the nuances of thought and language, he traces mankind's twenty-five century struggle to understand the phenomena of light and vision, beginning with Empedocles in Greek antiquity and ending in the quantum-mechanical era of Planck, Einstein and Bohr.
With scholarly patience, Park dissects and illuminates the struggles of early investigators to get a grip on the baffling mysteries of light and its interaction with the human eye. This often requires the author to pick bits of sense out of mounds of nonsense. He points out, for example, that even the wildly mistaken hypothesis of visual rays emanating from the eye led to some correct conclusions about geometric optics. Park also underscores the fact that taking the next step puts even the most accomplished scientists at risk. For example, Newton's particle interpretation of light incorrectly called for an increase of speed on passing from air to a denser material and (due to his influence and prestige) delayed acceptance of the wave interpretation pioneered by Huygens and conclusively demonstrated by Young. In an ironic twist, particles of light returned with a vengeance as thoroughly modern quantized photons.
Aside from some minor errors and omissions in figures, the only factual problems I encountered came on page 165, where convergence point P in Figure 6.5 is incorrectly called the focal point of the lens (this would be true only for incoming rays parallel with the optical axis), and the inverted real aerial image formed by the lens is misidentified as a virtual image.
Perhaps the most distinctive quality of "The Fire Within the Eye" is Park's astute and encyclopedic grasp of historical context. One senses that he is telling only a fraction of what he knows about the lives and times of the philosophers and scientists who populate the book.
  • Erienan
Excellent book that shouldn't have gone out of print. The figures are elucidating and Park very obviously have a strong grasp upon the topics being addressed.
  • Fenius
A memorial article for Physicist David Park (who sadly passed away January 12, 2012) reads thus:
"...many of David’s books and articles are essentially teaching vehicles, often based on original research."
That line is a fitting tribute to this 1997 book, The Fire Within The Eye (and his 1974 undergraduate-level textbook, Introduction To The Quantum Theory). Other reviewers have pointed to the many attributes of this book, I will not duplicate what they have written, but I will let David Park's words encroach:
(1) "One of the obligations of any scientist with a new idea is to set it on the big black block and suggest an experiment that will chop its head off." (page 312).
(2) "The paradox is not in Nature, but in human mental behavior. Quantum Mechanics...has been crafted as a science of qualities, not of things. The trouble is, we live in a world of things." (page 332).
(3) "Another reason for the delay---why nobody looked for a science of lenses--this states that vision is the process which brings the form of the object into the soul of the observer." (page 125). " For Aristotelians, light is a form, not a substance." (page 100).
(4) "The laws of modern physics are expressed as mathematical structures that summarize what a million experiments have told us about Nature." (page 63).
(5) " A particle is a kind of thing, a wave is a kind of motion, a force is a kind of push. The last two are more like verbs than nouns. It has turned out, though nobody expected or wanted it that way, that the three are tightly linked." (page 322). Concluding my brief review:
David Park writes beautifully. He skillfully weaves the various threads of history, physics, experiment and theory into a wonderful tapestry. You will find figures, illustrations, color-plates, and a Glossary of technical terminology. The ten pages of "references and further reading" allows for more digging. The sixteen- page bibliography adds to the value of the scholarship here displayed. Here is the concluding line of the book:
"Truth is finite, darkness is infinite and contains infinite possibilities. We come from darkness and end in darkness."
  • Andronrad
This book is very good, but I am more interested in the scientific than in the artistic aspects of the conception of light. It is a personal preference, and other person could have the reverse one.

I found some mistakes. For example, the author says that a blue light combined with a yellow one give a green light and that is not true. But the book is still good. I prefer "Catching the light" a lot, but I do not regret have read this interesting book.
  • blodrayne
A must read for everyone interested in Light. It explains everything - dual nature of light, polarization, diffraction, interference, colours, light as vibration of the fifth dimension, etc. Is useful both for the layman and the expert reader. The book's simplicity is its biggest advantage. From simplicity arises elegance.