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Download Collisions and Collaboration: The Organization of Learning in the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC eBook

by Markus Nordberg,Saïd Yami,Bertrand Nicquevert,Max Boisot

Download Collisions and Collaboration: The Organization of Learning in the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC eBook
ISBN:
0199567921
Author:
Markus Nordberg,Saïd Yami,Bertrand Nicquevert,Max Boisot
Category:
Physics
Language:
English
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; 1 edition (October 11, 2011)
Pages:
352 pages
EPUB book:
1173 kb
FB2 book:
1132 kb
DJVU:
1537 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
967


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Saïd Yami is associate Professor at the University of Montpellier 1 and Professor at EUROMED Management (France) in. .Bertrand Nicquevert is a Project Engineer at CERN

Saïd Yami is associate Professor at the University of Montpellier 1 and Professor at EUROMED Management (France) in Strategic Management. Bertrand Nicquevert is a Project Engineer at CERN. Within the ATLAS collaboration, he held various positions: as a member of the technical coordination, he was in charge of the geometrical integration; he led the technical design office; he was the project leader of the main ATLAS structure; and the coordinator of various zones, such as the so-called shielding disc.

Max Boisot was Professor at ESADE in Barcelona, Associate Fellow at the . Said Yami is associate Professor at the University of Montpellier 1 and Professor at EUROMED Management (France) in Strategic Management.

His book, Knowledge Assets: Securing Competitive Advantage in the Information Economy (Oxford University Press, 1998) was awarded the Ansoff Prize for the best book on strategy in 2000.

Collisions and Collaboration book. The ATLAS detector is a crucial element in the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva. Bertrand Nicquevert. After twenty-five years of preparation, the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, is finally running its intensive scientific experiments into high-energy particle physics. This piece of machinery was instrumental in 'discovering' the Higgs boson.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. These experiments, which have so captured the public's imagination, take the world of physics to a new energy level, the terascale, at which elementary particles are accelerated to one millionth of a percent of the speed of light and made to smash into each other with a combined energy of aroundfourteen trillion electron-volts.

Max Boisot, Markus Nordberg, Saïd Yami, and Bertrand Nicquevert. Olli Vuola and Max Boisot. 7 Learning and Innovation in Procurement: The Case of ATLAS-Type Projects

Max Boisot, Markus Nordberg, Saïd Yami, and Bertrand Nicquevert. 7 Learning and Innovation in Procurement: The Case of ATLAS-Type Projects. Erkko Autio, Marilena Streit-Bianchi, Ari-Pekka Hameri, and Max Boisot. 8 A Tale of Four Suppliers.

Collisions and Collaboration: The Organization of Learning in the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC. Max Boisot, Markus Nordberg, Saïd Yami, Bertrand Nicquevert.

In book: Collisions and Collaboration: The Organization of Learning in the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC . The ATLAS experiment at CERN, having entered the operational phase in September 2008, is designed to run for fifteen to twenty years

Cite this publication. The ATLAS experiment at CERN, having entered the operational phase in September 2008, is designed to run for fifteen to twenty years. What is the nature of this enterprise? The ATLAS detector itself can be thought of as a giant.

Collisions and Collaboration : The Organization of Learning in the ATLAS Experiment at the LH.

After twenty-five years of preparation, the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, is finally running its intensive scientific experiments into high-energy particle physics.

After twenty-five years of preparation, the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, is finally running its intensive scientific experiments into high-energy particle physics. These experiments, which have so captured the public's imagination, take the world of physics to a new energy level, the terascale, at which elementary particles are accelerated to one millionth of a percent of the speed of light and made to smash into each other with a combined energy of around fourteen trillion electron-volts. What new world opens up at the terascale? No one really knows, but the confident expectation is that radically new phenomena will come into view. The kind of "big science" being pursued at CERN, however, is becoming ever more uncertain and costly. Do the anticipated benefits justify the efforts and the costs? This book aims to give a broad organizational and strategic understanding of the nature of "big science" by analyzing one of the major experiments that uses the Large Hadron Collider, the ATLAS Collaboration. It examines such issues as: the flow of "interlaced" knowledge between specialist teams; the intra- and inter-organizational dynamics of "big science"; the new knowledge capital being created for the workings of the experiment by individual researchers, suppliers, and e-science and ICTs; the leadership implications of a collaboration of nearly three thousand members; and the benefits for the wider societal setting. This book aims to examine how, in the face of high levels of uncertainty and risk, ambitious scientific aims can be achieved by complex organizational networks characterized by cultural diversity, informality, and trust--and where "big science" can head next.
  • Hugighma
If you responsible for leading teams of incredibly talented people or building collaboratives comprised of ambitious rivals with conflicting agendas, this book is a must read. The LHC Collaborative serves as the perfect frame by which the reader is invited to explore how effective teams achieve incredible results despite the fact that these temporary work alliances are often fragile and strained.

More than that, you'll see how the process worked in helping achieve the one of greatest scientific discoveries in history.
  • Narder
Contrary to first appearances, this book is primarily for readers interested in management studies, or others who believe that an MBA is worthwhile for its content and not merely as a credential.

To calibrate this review: I’m not among those believers, and my interest was more prosaic, being in accelerators per se. I turned to this book because as I write Japan is a candidate for a large international accelerator project; if it wins, the project would be sited not far from where I live. I thought the book might help me prepare for an international conference about the collider being held soon in my hometown, and especially to help me learn more about how such projects are run and the hurdles they face. The book focuses on the ATLAS detector system, one of four experimental systems at the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland. That system alone entails a collaboration involving around 3,000 scientists in 38 countries.

I found some of what I was looking for in the first 10% of the book, with other tidbits scattered throughout the remaining portion. But from Chapter Two onward the facts and anecdotes of interest were embedded in a theory about something the authors call “I-Space.” This isn’t a theory about solipsism, but is something more like a solecism: borrowing the prestige of “information theory” while thoroughly making a hash of it. It's put forward using a befuddled approach all too common in management literature attempting to borrow from science: First the authors first build their science cred, in this case by citing various classic papers written by Zurek, Bennett or Landauer about information theory, i.e. the theory developed by Claude Shannon, whose 1948 paper is also cited. Next they throw in a chestnut or two of false wisdom, e.g. “In physics, entropy is a measure of disorder” (@35n8), and the claim that the Zurek, etc. papers “establish the equivalence between data and energy” (@30). Then throughout the rest of the book they throughly distort the scientific theory they invoked in the first place. In this case that includes talking about “information” as something that has meaning — not at all the way in which Shannon used the word, as he took some pains to mention his paper cited in the book.

This sort of pretentious misch-masch is pretty common and might have been easy to overlook if it had been confined to one chapter. But unfortunately the topic of the book turns out to be the nature of I-Space as illustrated by the ATLAS project, rather than that project in its own right. There’s plenty of discussion about the collaboration, of course, but it’s always with reference to what it teaches us about I-Space and and something the authors call “social learning cycles” (SLCs), the sort of reification that will make readers of Harvard Business Review feel right at home. So will the generous helping of 2x2 matrices, such as Perrow’s typology of suppliers; cites to strategy gurus like Michael Porter and Henry Mintzberg; quantitative explanations of “strategic option theory;” and the bestowal of extra profundity onto phrases like “distributed learning process” and “intrinsic project volatility” by putting them in italics.

Even from a management point of view, much of this is old wine in new bottles. The authors of Chapter 3 describe their “surprise” that the ATLAS team members didn’t have much use for conventional principles of management one of the authors had presented to them in three workshops. Rather, “creating the right context for highly motivated and competent people and letting them get on with it” may have better results than top-down specification and control (@75). Nice, but Mintzberg has been making this point for decades now, and this is also familiar from the famous B-school case of Honda’s US success with lightweight motorcycles during the 1970s. The chapters on procurement, which describe such technology development techniques as running several projects in parallel and seeing which one succeeds first or best, are pretty much what a company like Applied Materials was doing when I joined them 20 years ago. Can't knock the ATLAS team for using such techniques, but the book veers into fiction when it treats these practices as something novel or peculiar to this type of collaboration. Elsewhere we’re given the revelation that “In effect, the ATLAS detector, the primary focus of the collaboration’s concerns and efforts, constitutes the physical hub of a vast heterogenous network engaged in globally-distributed data-processing activities and pursuing ambitious scientific objectives” (@202). Who knew?

If you enjoy reading business books, and especially ones that twine together business and themes from physics, then very possibly you’ll enjoy this book. Just be aware that it’s not written in the easy-reading style of the typical business bestseller -- it’s published by Oxford, after all -- though that might also make it seem all the more important. If you’ve already read Mintzberg, and especially if you've worked at a technology-intensive manufacturing company, there's not much new you'll get from it aside from the physics ambience. If you’re mainly interested in particle physics, spend at most an hour or two dipping into the book at your institution’s library, and save your money.
  • Alsath
This is a first-class introduction to advanced particle physics and its research for the non-physicist, and a fascinating look inside the organization of the largest multinational research effort of our times. In advanced physics, this is "the only game in town" -- so its outcomes matter enormously to the physicists taking part, and also to the millions of citizens from around the world whose taxes fund it, and whose economies will benefit (eventually) from its findings. The recent success of the CERN researchers in discovering evidence of the Higgs boson is testimony that the intricate web of trust and information sharing and collaborative learning worked, despite the vast majority of researchers not being CERN employees. The sheer audacity of endeavoring to find evidence required significant advances in detectors and computers particularly, well beyond the capabilities of the time when this project began. Hence not only did researchers have to push their suppliers; they also had to interactively solve problems, where one researcher's preference might unwittingly cause difficulties for others. The book lays out the organizational responses to such uncertainty -- key lessons for businesses with outsourced partners scattered around the globe, mostly not company employees, whose innovative capabilities must be engaged. Well worth the effort to read it!Collisions and Collaboration: The Organization of Learning in the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC