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Download A Legacy of Madness: Recovering My Family from Generations of Mental Illness eBook

by Tom Davis

Download A Legacy of Madness: Recovering My Family from Generations of Mental Illness eBook
ISBN:
1616491213
Author:
Tom Davis
Category:
Death & Grief
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hazelden Publishing (October 4, 2011)
Pages:
273 pages
EPUB book:
1940 kb
FB2 book:
1855 kb
DJVU:
1171 kb
Other formats
txt mobi lrf lit
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
765


A Legacy of Madness breaks down the barriers of silence that shroud mental illnesses within families for generations. By sharing the story of his family history and his own personal journey, Tom Davis provides hope and inspiration to others - Former First Lady Rosalynn Carter.

A Legacy of Madness breaks down the barriers of silence that shroud mental illnesses within families for generations. This is a book from the heart, and for any family with somebody who has a mental illness, this is a must read - Former . I've long wondered how I should lend my voice to the tenth anniversary of the September 11 attacks.

A Legacy of Madness portrays Tom Davis's captivating discoveries of mental illness throughout generations of his family

A Legacy of Madness portrays Tom Davis's captivating discoveries of mental illness throughout generations of his family.

Tom Davis and his family have experienced the impact of mental illness generation after generation. Tom is the author of the book, A Legacy of Madness: Recovering My Family from Generations of Mental Illness. Tom's candid portrayal is an important statement for mental health advocates, patients and families who are struggling to understand how to deal with mental health problems and the devastating impact on families.

His first book, A Legacy of Madness: Recovering My Family from Generations of Mental Illness, was released by Hazelden . Tom Davis was named "Citizen of the Year" by the New Jersey Psychiatric Association in 2007

His first book, A Legacy of Madness: Recovering My Family from Generations of Mental Illness, was released by Hazelden Publishing on Oct. 3, 2011. Davis teaches journalism classes at Rutgers University, and a course on mental health issues in the media at Fairleigh Dickinson University in New Jersey. He also teaches a class called News Reporting and Writing as well as Media Ethics at Rutgers. Tom Davis was named "Citizen of the Year" by the New Jersey Psychiatric Association in 2007

Dorothy Winans 'Dede Davis had worried, fussed, and obsessed for the last . of Madness : Recovering My Family from Generations of Mental Illness.

Dorothy Winans 'Dede Davis had worried, fussed, and obsessed for the last time. A Legacy of Madness : Recovering My Family from Generations of Mental Illness.

Hannah- Hannah Westburg. Rae- Chelsea Rae Swiggett. Story of a girl with Anxiety and Social Phobia. Investigating his mother's history led to that of Davis's grandfather, a top administrator at one of the largest psychiatric hospitals in the country; his great-grandfather who died of self-inflicted gas asphyxiation during.

The Effects of Parental Mental Illness on Children and the Need for Healing. April 14, 2016, Elisabet KvarnstromBridges to Recovery. Impaired Parenting and Family Discord. The Impact of Untreated Parental Mental Illness. Helping Parents Heal. Ivy McQuain had two sons she loved more than anything. I thought I was the best mother in the world. I was home when they got home. I went to college and earned my degrees. To the outside world, I was an outstanding mother, she writes in a moving essay for The Mighty

A Legacy of Madness portrays Tom Davis's captivating discoveries of mental illness throughout generations of his family

A Legacy of Madness portrays Tom Davis's captivating discoveries of mental illness throughout generations of his family.

Dorothy Winans 'Dede' Davis had worried, fussed, and obsessed for the last time. Her heart stopped beating in a fit of anxiety, soon after her wobbly legs gave way. In the wake of his mother's death, Tom Davis knew one thing: Helplessly self-absorbed and severely obsessive compulsive, Dede led a tormented life. She had moved from nursing home to mental institution in recent years, but what really caused her death? The story of a loving family coming to grips with its own fragilities, A Legacy of Madness relays Tom Davis's journey to uncover, and ultimately understand, the history of mental illness that led generations of his suburban American family to their demise. Investigating his mother's history led to that of Davis's grandfather, a top administrator at one of the largest psychiatric hospitals in the country; his great-grandfather who died of self-inflicted gas asphyxiation during the Depression; and his great-great grandmother who, with her eldest son, completed suicide one tragic day. Ultimately, four generations of family members showed clear signs of depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and alcoholism--often mistreated illnesses that test one's ability to cope. Through this intimate memoir we join Davis on a personal odyssey to ensure that the fifth generation--he and his siblings--recover their family legacy, by not only surviving their own mental health disorders but by getting the help they need to lead healthy, balanced lives. In the end, we witness Davis's powerful transition as he makes peace with the past and heals through forgiveness and compassion for his family--and himself.
  • Fonceiah
Full disclosure off the bat - the author is a friend of mine. That said, he's a good enough friend for me to be honest in my review. Let it also be known that I do not make it a habit to read memoirs or books about mental illness. In fact, I picked up the book to support the author with no intention of reading it. It felt uncomfortable; too... voyeuristic. A chat with the author allayed by hesitation and I'm glad it did.
This no no "Million Little Pieces" or whatever that lie was called. This is a factual book that takes the reader deep into a family's history and into Tom's own psyche, from suicides of his forebears to his battles with eating disorders - places that most of us would rather not travel in our own lives. For that courage, props are deserved. The writing is vivid and as the exposition unfolds, traveling back-and-forth from the early 20th century to present day, the reader is swept along on the voyage, at times leaving you shaking your head and commenting things like, "Holy crap," out loud.
My only real criticism is that the book could have used a better editor to smooth out a couple of spots, maybe do a bit more in the proofing department. That said, I'm a writer/editor by trade and notice things a bit more than the average reader.
Ultimately, if you have an interest in mental health as an issue clinically or personally, do yourself a favor and read this book.
  • Warianys
Tom Davis has written an intensely personal, brutally honest and thoroughly captivating account of what it was like to grow up in a family where normal was anything but normal.

But rather than being the horror story one might expect from this title and subject matter, Tom's account is written in a way that tells a story that anyone can relate to. His story has interesting characters, compelling story lines, and instances of betrayal and fidelity to rival any good work of fiction. But it's all the more riveting because it's not!

Tom's need to write this book came from his desire to make sense of his world, to understand who he was. And he knew that to do that he would need to understand the family that produced him. So Tom did what any good journalist would do: research.

Tom visited archives of the towns where he knew his family had lived. He poured over news accounts that may have contained information about his family. And he conducted personal, sometimes difficult, interviews with family members. What he's unearthed has become the body of this work and the answers he sought.

Tom has done much for the mental health community, but he has done his best work yet with the publication of this book. Because with it he has managed to bring a difficult subject matter to a much greater audience in a way that is both informative and entertaining.
  • Anardred
Wow! That's my first impression. This is an important book everyone needs to read. Everyone is affected by mental illness. Make no mistake about it, whether it's a family member, a friend, or co-worker .... Davis crafts this page-turner with such clarity and detail about his generations of family mental illness, starting with his great-great grandparents who both committed suicide to the decade's long struggle of his mother before her eventual death in 2003.
It's clear from the beginning this isn't a family tell-all, it's about saving his family members that are still left. It's a compelling work where the truth is the key to finally breaking the destructive pattern generation s have suffered through. Davis also examines what it's like to marry into a family with a history of mental illness, and what it does to them.
He doesn't just re-tell his story, he relives it, as his investigation takes him to graveyards, basement library archives, meetings with relatives he didn't even know he had, and frank talks with the Father that so puzzled him growing up. Above all, his love for his family, specifically his children, shines through as a beaker of hope in all this madness. The book doesn't leave you saddened at the end, but determined and ready to take action for that someone in your life that needs the same help.
Davis' rare open account of his own struggles with bulimia (as a male), the beginning of his own mental struggles, and what he plans to do for his generation, is what makes this book so great. This is a story that sticks with you long after the final page is turned. You find yourself thinking about parts of the book and sharing it with everyone you know.
It's an important work for mental health advocates, patients and families who are still looking for answers on mental health. It sheds light on a difficult subject, and takes the shame and embarrassment away from mental health issues.
A captivating, engaging, and at times distressful read. It reads like fiction, but it's not. Davis helps you realize everyone is not at "normal" as you think. I read it twice.
  • salivan
A must-read to help understand mental illness and its devastating impact on families. Davis is a veteran journalist who has emerged as a leading authority in covering mental health issues and has dedicated his blog ([...]) to mental health. Davis writes with great clarity and detail about his mom's struggles with obsessive-compulsive disorder and alcoholism. He delves into his family's history and the tragedies of how failing mental health has cascaded through prior generations. The author also recognizes his own issues, those of his siblings and the steps taken to protect his children's mental health.
If anything, the book encourages those needing help to get it and helps remove some of the stigma that was associated with seeking help and the tragic consequences of not getting help. Culturally, Americans have started to recognize the need to address mental health (health insurance parity laws, DTC advertising for behavioral medications, clinical evidence about the connection between mental and physical health). Davis' book is an important statement for mental health advocates, patients and families who are struggling to understand how to deal with mental health problems.