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Download A Long-Shadowed Grief: Suicide and Its Aftermath eBook

by Harold Ivan Smith

Download A Long-Shadowed Grief: Suicide and Its Aftermath eBook
ISBN:
1561012815
Author:
Harold Ivan Smith
Category:
Death & Grief
Language:
English
Publisher:
Cowley Publications (January 25, 2007)
Pages:
176 pages
EPUB book:
1721 kb
FB2 book:
1454 kb
DJVU:
1350 kb
Other formats
txt doc lrf lrf
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
683


A Long-Shadowed Grief book. In the aftermath of suicide, friends and family face a long road of grief and reflection.

A Long-Shadowed Grief book. He asks how one may live a spiritual life as a survivor, and he addresses the way faith is permanently altered by the residue of stigma that attaches to suicide.

In the aftermath of suicide, friends and family face a long road of grief and reflection. He asks how one may live a spiritual life as a survivor, and he addresses the way faith is permanently altered by "the residue of stigma" that attaches to suicide.

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com's Harold Ivan Smith Author Page. A Long-Shadowed Grief: Suicide and Its Aftermath Jan 25, 2007. by Harold Ivan Smith. Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).

A Long-Shadowed Grief. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Read "A Long-Shadowed Grief Suicide and Its Aftermath" by Harold Ivan Smith . A Long-Shadowed Grief. Suicide and Its Aftermath. Harold Ivan Smith is the author of many books on dying, death, and grieving. Religion & Spirituality Nonfiction. A former funeral director, he is a member of the Association for Death Education and Counseling, and leads seminars on grief and spirituality throughout the world

A Norton professional book. Bibliography: p. 291-308.

A Norton professional book.

In the aftermath of suicide, friends and family face a long road of grief and reflection. With a sympathetic eye and a firm hand, Harold Ivan Smith searches for the place of the spirit in the wake of suicide. He asks how one may live a spiritual life as a survivor, and he addresses the way faith is permanently altered by “the residue of stigma” that attaches to suicide.
  • Pedar
I read this over the month following my son's suicide. Very relateable. Grief must still be felt but I enjoyed the book.
  • Malodred
I really appreciated many of the author's insights, and I especially appreciated that the message wasn't an oversimplified, "Jesus will make everything right, so be happy" message. Although much of the book has a religious message, there are definitely thoughts and suggestions that would help anyone who is a survivor of another's suicide.
  • Sudert
Lacking scientific information. Religiosity limits audience outreach. Very good at relating to suicide survivors and emotionally engaging. Three more words required.
  • Felhalar
Our son passed away from suicide. I have read many books looking for answers to gain a peace about this place we continue to be in. This is the best book we have read. It is written by a survivor of suicide who lost someone dear to them. I highly recommended this book. If you buy one book buy this one. It will change your life. The author insights are rewarding. We have several in our support group reading it and they are experiencing that same peace we are. After reading it once, I go back to it often.
  • lubov
Harold Ivan Smith is a gifted author, speaker, and clinician. He is able to treat the most difficult of subjects with deep compassion.
  • Saithinin
This book is in great condition. Great price. Not exactly what I was needing, but still a good read. thanks
  • Paxondano
Author Smith has written many books on dying, death and grieving (as a former funeral director) and leads seminars on grief and spirituality. His cousin committed suicide (or suicided, as he terms it)--so he is also a "survivor" of suicide--those left behind. In the past few years, people dear to me had young people suicide.

Every 16.5 minutes there is a suicide (86.7 in the U.S. every day--a million in the world every year), and Smith writes about the days, months, years and even generations the "whys" of suicide affect a family. Often families deny the "truth" of the suicide because of suicide's stigma to those left.

He writes of famous people suiciding (Katherine Graham's and Joan River's husbands, and many famous children) and of average people who come to help of others going through what they have and are still experiencing.

Smith writes about survivors not being able to pray in the "dark despair of the spiritual night. Vance Havner is quoted: "If you can't pray as you want, pray as you can. God knows what you need." Prayer cannot lesson the pain but it can change the survivor.

"Even though I walk through the valley of death," (Psalm 23:4) the author asks survivors to reflect on the word "through"--as on a journey, not staying in one place. "I will fear no evil, for you are with me." (v.4).

Many survivors say suicide grief is like no other grief. For example, the insinuations from people about your parenting (if it was your child)--and he recommends you not allow those kinds of people around you.

The stats on page 17 were sobering. So much about suicide centers on youth (1,000 on college campus suicide each year), but the 65+ age group has the most suicides.

Although 90 percent of people who suicide are mentally ill, there is no "suicide gene," but depression, manic depression, schizophrenia and alcoholism (mood disorders) have a strong genetic base.

Armchair Interviews says: Even if you have not been affected by suicide, the book will give you more compassion and empathy toward others--well worth your reading time.