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Download Death of a Cult Family: Jim Jones (Days of Tragedy) eBook

by Sue L. Hamilton

Download Death of a Cult Family: Jim Jones (Days of Tragedy) eBook
ISBN:
093917958X
Author:
Sue L. Hamilton
Category:
Death & Grief
Language:
English
Publisher:
Abdo Group (November 1, 1989)
EPUB book:
1488 kb
FB2 book:
1213 kb
DJVU:
1144 kb
Other formats
mobi doc lit txt
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
209


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Death of a Cult Family book.

The Rev Jim Jones is so right about everything he says. This book should be read by everybody considering mass worship, it has certainly changed mine and Ood's lives.

Jim Jones was an American cult leader. James Warren ‘Jim’ Jones was a notorious American cult leader. This biography profiles his childhood, life, career, achievements and timeline. He started and led the Peoples’ Temple in Indiana in the 1950s, and later moved it to California in the 1960s. He gained notoriety when the Temple moved to San Francisco in the early 1970s. He was also responsible for the death of Congressman Leo Ryan, who was on a visit to the Jonestown Temple to investigate human rights violation allegations against Jones. Jones had six adoptive children and one biological son with his wife, Marceline Baldwin Jones. Jones died on 18 November 1978.

Guyana Tragedy: The Story of Jim Jones, also called The Mad Messiah, is a 1980 television miniseries about the Peoples Temple led by Jim Jones, and their 1978 mass suicide at Jonestown.

Rather than face the charges against him, Jim Jones committed suicide, and convinced virtually most of his followers to do the same. Written by Brian W Martz

Jim Jones, he said, gave him a new self-image. The books and magazines were about conspiracies, spies, political imprisonment, people who manipulate the news and Marxism. On the ninth day, the government allowed about fifty news ghouls into the jungle enclave. We flew up to Matthews Ridge and were ferried the twenty or so miles to the ghost town in one helicopter accommodating twelve.

The Cult that Died: The Tragedy of Jim Jones and the Peoples Temple. New York: Putnam, 1980. Hamilton, Sue L. The Death of a Cult Family: Jim Jones. Minneapolis: Abdo Consulting, 1989. Moore, Rebecca and Fielding McGehee III, eds.

Named after their leader, the Reverend Jim Jones, founder of the Peoples Temple of the Disciples of Christ . After building up a picture of a day in the life of a Jonestown resident, Cahill outlined something similar to the routine of a labour camp.

Named after their leader, the Reverend Jim Jones, founder of the Peoples Temple of the Disciples of Christ, Jonestown was envisaged as a rainbow family of all ages and races, working towards the utopia the preacher had promised them: Divine principles. A society where people own all things in common, where there is no rich or poor, where there are no races. To help you learn in your sleep, the public address system was sometimes kept on all night.

A brief biographical account of Jones and a description of his church and the mass suicide which he inspired.