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Download The Iceberg: A Memoir eBook

by Marion Coutts

Download The Iceberg: A Memoir eBook
ISBN:
0802124607
Author:
Marion Coutts
Category:
Relationships
Language:
English
Publisher:
Grove Press, Black Cat; Reprint edition (February 2, 2016)
Pages:
288 pages
EPUB book:
1572 kb
FB2 book:
1524 kb
DJVU:
1185 kb
Other formats
azw mobi mbr lit
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
117


Marion Coutts is a visual artist, working in sculpture, photography, film and video. She met and married Tom Lubbock, an art historian and critic and collagist; they were together for 14 years and had one child.

Marion Coutts is a visual artist, working in sculpture, photography, film and video.

In 2014 Coutts published the book The Iceberg, a "poetic and searing memoir" about her husband's death

In 2014 Coutts published the book The Iceberg, a "poetic and searing memoir" about her husband's death. The memoir begins at the point of Lubbock's 2008 diagnosis and follows him, Coutts, and their son Eugene (called "Ev" in the book) up through his treatment and eventual death in 2011. The Los Angeles Times praised the book, saying, "'The plot. of The Iceberg can be summed up in a sentence: A man gets sick and dies.

is artist and writer Marion Coutts’ astonishing memoir; an adventure of being and dying and a compelling, poetic .

In 2008, Tom Lubbock, the chief art critic for The Independent was diagnosed with a brain tumor.

The book is Coutts' response to the diagnosis, illness and death of her husband, the art critic, Tom Lubbock who died of a brain tumour in January 2011. In short bursts of beautiful, textured prose, Coutts uses words as a weapon against loss. The Iceberg is an exploration of the impact of death in real time, a sustained act of looking that only ends when life does

A memoir by Marion Coutts that narrates her husband's illness with brain cancer. I won't say battle because there is no winning. Sparsely and precisely written, but packed with underlying currents that are extremely intense

A memoir by Marion Coutts that narrates her husband's illness with brain cancer. Sparsely and precisely written, but packed with underlying currents that are extremely intense. Coutts is startlingly very matter-of-fact, but in this memoir, she underlines what it is to be human, what it is to be ill, what it is to be loved, valued, needed, and what it means to lose the floor beneath you. Never sentimental, never maudlin, never morose, never pitying, we follow Coutts and her small family through to the inevitable; her husband dies

A memoir by Marion Coutts that narrates her husband's illness with brain cancer.

A memoir by Marion Coutts that narrates her husband's illness with brain cancer. Coutts is startlingly very matter-of-fact, but in this memoir, she underlines what it is to be human, I have read two incredibly powerful books almost back to back: the history of Ravensbruck, the Nazi concentration camp for women, and now, The Iceberg.

The Iceberg: A Memoir. The winner of the 2015 wellcome book prize shortlisted for the samuel johnson prize, 2014 shortlisted for the costa book awards, 2014 (biography, memoir category) shortlisted for the duff cooper prize longlisted for the guardian first book award, 2014. In 2008 the art critic Tom Lubbock was diagnosed with a brain tumour. He died early in 2011. Marion Coutts was his wife.

In short bursts of exquisitely textured prose, The Iceberg becomes a singular work of art and an uplifting and universal story of endurance in the face of loss. Dazzling, devastating. Open Road + Grove/Atlantic, 2 февр.

item 2 The Iceberg: A Memoir, Coutts, Marion, New, Book -The Iceberg: A Memoir, Coutts, Marion, New, Book. Marion Coutts is an artist and writer. She wrote the introduction to Tom Lubbock's memoir Until Further Notice, I am Alive, published by Granta in 2012

item 2 The Iceberg: A Memoir, Coutts, Marion, New, Book -The Iceberg: A Memoir, Coutts, Marion, New, Book. item 3 (Very Good)-The Iceberg: A Memoir (Paperback)-Marion Coutts-1782393528 -(Very Good)-The Iceberg: A Memoir (Paperback)-Marion Coutts-1782393528. She wrote the introduction to Tom Lubbock's memoir Until Further Notice, I am Alive, published by Granta in 2012. She is a Lecturer in Fine Art at Goldsmiths College and lives in London with her son. Country of Publication.

Winner of the Wellcome PrizeA finalist for the Samuel Johnson Prize and the Costa Award“A memoir quite unlike any other. It has the strength of an arrow: taut, spiked, quavering, working to its fatal conclusion...an extraordinary story told in an extraordinary way.”—The Sunday Times“The most heartbreaking memoir of the year.”—Independent on SundayWinner of the Wellcome Book Prize, and finalist for every major nonfiction award in the UK, including the Samuel Johnson Prize and the Costa Award, The Iceberg is artist and writer Marion Coutts’ astonishing memoir; an “adventure of being and dying “and a compelling, poetic meditation on family, love, and language.In 2008, Tom Lubbach, the chief art critic for The Independent was diagnosed with a brain tumor. The Iceberg is his wife, Marion Coutts’, fierce, exquisite account of the two years leading up to his death. In spare, breathtaking prose, Coutts conveys the intolerable and, alongside their two year old son Ev—whose language is developing as Tom’s is disappearing—Marion and Tom lovingly weather the storm together. In short bursts of exquisitely textured prose, The Iceberg becomes a singular work of art and an uplifting and universal story of endurance in the face of loss.
  • Redfury
This is an extraordinary book that touches the depths of both sorrow and joy in loving, of strength and frailty in living, and of the mix of life and death for a family immersed in terminal illness. The irony of her husband's loss of speech due to the illness counterposed with the learning to talk by her little son is deeply affecting. Coutts has written a standout work in this memoir, one that grabbed me from the start and will not let me go after finishing the book.
  • Chilldweller
Devastating and devastatingly beautiful. Will take you places I can almost guarantee you will immediately be able to go, you will have to come back to. Like a leaf in a maelstrom the reader is tossed, whirled, blasted in the winds of rage and pain, then finally left to drift down into a wondrous grace. Marion Coutts poetic rendering of every confusion, every fear, every moment of transcendence is as unique a voice as any I have ever read on any subject; when the subject is this profound it is beyond imagining that she could capture it so completely, and hand it whole to her reader. I found out about this book when Bill Bryson mentioned it in a New York Times interview. I believe he listed it when asked what book last made him cry. I am so glad he led me to it.
  • Skilkancar
The Iceberg reads like what it most certainly is -- a journal kept by the author from the moment of her husband's diagnosis until his death. I understand that for a writer, what Nora Ehpron said is true: "Everything is Copy." Yet, I was continually aware, reading this, that even as the author grieved and struggled, she was consciously fashioning a record that she must have intended all along would find its way into print. The level of detail is such that this must have been a day by day account, and not a memoir "recollected in tranquility." Having said that, I found it gorgeously written, penetratingly sad, tough going in places, but ultimately rewarding and worth having read. Other reviewers faulted this account because the author did not fully develop her husband as a personality. But this is not a novel, and he is not a character. This is her journal, her story, and there were many instances, such as, for example, her joy when she got a late night or early morning phone call from her husband (who was in hospital) that gave you to understand how connected they were and what an incredible loss this was for her. Marion Coutts manages to convey her love, grief loss, with incredible sensitivity and without sentimentality.
  • Ral
I have read two incredibly powerful books almost back to back: the history of Ravensbruck, the Nazi concentration camp for women, and now, The Iceberg. Oh boy. The Iceberg. A memoir by Marion Coutts that narrates her husband's illness with brain cancer. I won't say battle because there is no winning. Sparsely and precisely written, but packed with underlying currents that are extremely intense. Coutts is startlingly very matter-of-fact, but in this memoir, she underlines what it is to be human, what it is to be ill, what it is to be loved, valued, needed, and what it means to lose the floor beneath you. Never sentimental, never maudlin, never morose, never pitying, we follow Coutts and her small family through to the inevitable; her husband dies. We know this from the beginning. But it is the path we take with them that is shocking, naked, and raw. And you feel it. It's not a simple read, and after I finished it, I sat on the couch for a long time, just sitting. Everything I could possibly do seemed insignificant after reading the last line. And that is what makes this book so profound, and make Coutts such a force of a writer. Not an easy read, but an incredible one.
  • Chuynopana
Coutts is a wonderful writer and this story of her time with dealing with
her husband's illness was sad, funny and at times, uplifting. I related to much of what she
wrote. I personally found her writing to be a bit out of my league I must admit. She is truly
gifted -- extremely gifted and intelligent and some of her writing is simply poetic --- still,
I enjoyed her vision of this experience so very uplifting and joyous and so unlike what one would
expect from a woman who went thru this very "grueling" experience.
  • Malodred
This is a memoir describing the death of the author's husband. I felt the full range of emotions while reading this story. Some readers may be put off by the brutal honesty, but the honesty of the narrative is what makes it valuable. If you expect to "like" or "enjoy" this book you may be disappointed. I would encourage anyone in medicine or nursing to read this book as a way to gain insight into what your patients and their families experience at the end of life. Also recommended for anyone dealing with a serious illness of their own. Reading this book put a lot of things in perspective for me.
  • Rarranere
This is a very tough, great memoir, a difficult journey as a wife & mother participates in her husban'd ultimately (inevitably) unsuccessful battle with brain cancer. But she is a trenchant and honest & sometimes poetic writer, and it is a worthwhile, if difficult, journey to take with her & her husband & young son! I experienced many of the same peaks & valleys as I lost my wife to a similar cancer, & I doubt anyone will surpass her for capturing such hard times. (Although I feel she behaved better than me.). I highly recommend this book!
It is impossible to convey the power of this book. A wife chronicles the slow death of her husband with fantastically beautiful images and descriptions of what it means to spend two years with a toddler in a hospital system insisting and demanding and adjusting to the painful realities of the world and the healthcare system.