almediah.fr
» » Fear and Trembling and The Sickness Unto Death

Download Fear and Trembling and The Sickness Unto Death eBook

by Walter Lowrie,Gordon Marino,Søren Kierkegaard

Download Fear and Trembling and The Sickness Unto Death eBook
ISBN:
0691158312
Author:
Walter Lowrie,Gordon Marino,Søren Kierkegaard
Category:
Philosophy
Language:
English
Publisher:
Princeton University Press; Revised ed. edition (April 28, 2013)
Pages:
504 pages
EPUB book:
1331 kb
FB2 book:
1535 kb
DJVU:
1205 kb
Other formats
lrf txt rtf mbr
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
429


Walter Lowrie's classic, bestselling translation of Søren Kierkegaard's most important and popular books remains .

Walter Lowrie's classic, bestselling translation of Søren Kierkegaard's most important and popular books remains unmatched for its readability and literary quality. Fear and Trembling and The Sickness Unto Death established Kierkegaard as the father of existentialism and have come to define his contribution to philosophy. Gordon Marino is professor at St. Olaf College, specializing in History of Philosophy, Philosophy of Religion, and Kierkegaard.

Walter Lowrie's classic, bestselling translation of Søren Kierkegaard's most important and popular books remains .

How did you like the book?

Give a Bookmate subscription →. About Bookmate. ADDENDUM: I made it through Fear and Trembling but gave up early into Sickness when I hit the sentence that read The self is a relation which relates itself to its own self, or it is that in the relation that the relation relates itself to its own self; the self is not the relation but that the relation relates itself to its.

Overview: Walter Lowrie's classic, bestselling translation of Søren Kierkegaard's most important and popular books remains unmatched for its readability and literary quality. Lowrie's translation, first published in 1941 and later revised, was the first in English, and it has introduced hundreds of thousands of readers to Kierkegaard's thought

Translated and with notes.

Translated and with notes. With a new introduction. Princeton university press. Princeton and Oxford. There is much in this demanding book to cross-examine current views of the good life.

Fear and Trembling and The Sickness Unto Death. by Søren Kierkegaard · Walter Lowrie. This is the most comprehensive anthology of Soren Kierkegaard's works ever assembled in English. Either/Or is the earliest of the major works of Søren Kierkegaard, one of the most startlingly original thinkers and writers of the nineteenth century, and the. Either/Or, Part I.

Book Description: Walter Lowrie's classic, bestselling translation of Søren Kierkegaard's most important and popular books remains unmatched for its readability and literary quality. Lowrie's translation, first published in 1941 and later revised, was the first in English, and it has introduced hundreds of thousands of readers to Kierkegaard's thought

They were translated into German early in the twentieth century and have had an enormous influence since then, on both Christian theology and the existentialist tradition in philosophy.

They were translated into German early in the twentieth century and have had an enormous influence since then, on both Christian theology and the existentialist tradition in philosophy. Библиографические данные.

Soren Kierkegaard, Walter Lowrie, Gordon Marino. Walter Lowrie's classic, bestselling translation of Soren Kierkegaard's most important and popular books remains unmatched for its readability and literary quality. Lowrie's translation, first published in 1941 and later revised, was the first in English, and it has introduced hundreds of thousands of readers to Kierkegaard's thought.

Walter Lowrie's classic, bestselling translation of Søren Kierkegaard's most important and popular books remains unmatched for its readability and literary quality. Fear and Trembling and The Sickness Unto Death established Kierkegaard as the father of existentialism and have come to define his contribution to philosophy. Lowrie's translation, first published in 1941 and later revised, was the first in English, and it has introduced hundreds of thousands of readers to Kierkegaard's thought. Kierkegaard counted Fear and Trembling and The Sickness Unto Death among "the most perfect books I have written," and in them he introduces two terms--"the absurd" and "despair"--that have become key terms in modern thought. Fear and Trembling takes up the story of Abraham and Isaac to explore a faith that transcends the ethical, persists in the face of the absurd, and meets its reward in the return of all that the faithful one is willing to sacrifice, while The Sickness Unto Death examines the spiritual anxiety of despair.

Walter Lowrie's magnificent translation of these seminal works continues to provide an ideal introduction to Kierkegaard. And, as Gordon Marino argues in a new introduction, these books are as relevant as ever in today's age of anxiety.

  • Joony
This book, particularly the writing of The Sickness Unto Death, has given me the tools necessary to cope spiritually when in the throes of a depressed episode. God is with me and this painful existence is temporary.
  • Black_Hawk_Down.
This is one of the more readable books by Soren Kierkegaard. Fear and Trembling fits well with the biography I read of his life a few years ago and expands the reason why he broke off the engagement of marriage with his fiancé. It is also a very good at explaining the relationship between Abraham and Isaac. How his decision to sacrifice Isaac did not make him a murderer.
The book Sickness Unto Death tackles the who issue of sin and how it robs us from really knowing ourselves. The sickness unto death is original sin and its terrible affect on humanity.
  • Tygrarad
Seriously challenges aesthetic life with valid questions.
  • Zymbl
A must read
  • Cerar
Wonderful Book! Thank you so much!
  • Hallolan
Great book.
  • Mariwyn
Kierkegaard (1813-1855) was a Danish philosopher, theologian, poet, social critic, and religious author, who was the first existentialist philosopher. He wrote many other books, including Philosophical Fragments,Concluding Unscientific Postscript,Attack upon Christendom, etc. [NOTE: page numbers refer to the 278-page Anchor paperback edition.]

The Translator's Note states, "In the individual introductions... I have quoted enough from Kierkegaard's journals to inform the reader of the situation in which these poetical books were produced. When `Fear and Trembling' was first published in Denmark, no one could have the least suspicion that it depicted a crisis in the editor's life. Such a book may be interesting, even enthralling... but it gains immensely in pathos when one knows that it is a transcription, however poetical, of the author's agonizing reflections upon a problem which was gnawing at his viscera." He adds of `Fear and Trembling' and its companion `Repetition' that "both recount his desperate struggle in renouncing every hope of earthly happiness when he gave up the prospect of marriage with the woman he loved [i.e., his broken engagement to Regina Olson]. We know that while he was writing these two works the struggle to attain resignation was complicated by the hope that he might yet make Regina his wife." (Pg. 9)

Fear and Trembling (F&T) is based on the story in Genesis 21-22 of God ordering Abraham to sacrifice his son Isaac. Kierkegaard says in F&T, "If there were no eternal consciousness in a man, if at the foundation of all there lay only a wildly seething power which writhing with obscure passions produced everything that is great and everything that is insignificant, if a bottomless void never satiated lay hidden beneath all---what then would life be but despair?" (Pg. 30) He points out, "What they leave out of Abraham's history is dread; for to money I have no ethical obligation, but to the son the father has the highest and most sacred obligation." (Pg. 39) He observes, "One cannot weep over Abraham. One approaches him with a `horror religious,' as Israel approached Mount Sinai. If then the solitary man who ascends Mount Moriah... if he be not a somnambulist who walks securely above the abyss while he who is stationed at the foot of the mountain and is looking on trembles with fear and out of reverence and dread dare not even call to him---if this man is disordered in his mind, if he had made a mistake! Thanks and thanks again to him who proffers to the man whom the sorrows of life have assaulted and left naked---proffers to him the fig-leaf of the word with which he can cover his wretchedness." (Pg. 72)

He states, "Either there is an absolute duty toward God, and if so it is the paradox here described, that the individual as the individual is higher than the universal and as the individual stands in an absolute relation to the absolute/or else faith never existed, because it has always existed, or, to put it differently, Abraham is lost, or one must explain the passage in the fourteenth chapter of Luke as did that tasteful exegete..." (Pg. 91)

In SUD, he comments on Jesus' reported remark about Lazarus ["This sickness is not unto death"]: "And what help would it have been to Lazarus to be awakened from the dead, if the thing must end after all with his dying--how would that have helped Lazarus, if He did not live who is the resurrection and the life for everyone who believes in Him? No, it is not because Lazarus was awakened from the dead, not for this can one say that THIS sickness is not unto death; but because He lives, therefore this sickness is not unto death. For, humanly speaking, death is the last thing of all; and, humanly speaking, there is hope only so long as there is life. But Christianly understood death is by no means the last thing of all, hence it is only a little event within that which is all, an eternal life; and Christianly understood there is in death infinitely much more hope than merely humanly speaking there is when there not only is life but this life exhibits the fullest health and vigor." (Pg. 144)

He states, "... he is in despair about the eternal, he despairs over himself that he could be weak enough to ascribe to the earthly such great importance, which now becomes his despairing expression for the fact that he has lost the eternal and himself. Here is the scale of ascent. First, in consciousness of himself; for to despair about the eternal is impossible without having a conception about the self, that there is something eternal in it, or that it has had something eternal in it. And if a man is to despair over himself, he must indeed be conscious also of having a self; that, however, is the thing over which he despairs---not over the earthly or over something earthly, but over himself... despair is precisely to have lost the eternal and oneself." (Pg. 195-196) Later, he adds, "Despair is potentiated in proportion to consciousness of self; but the self if potentiated in the ratio of the measure proposed for the self, and infinitely potentiated when God is the measure. The more conception of God, the more self; the more self, the more conception of God. Only when the self as this definite individual is conscious of existing before God, only then is it the infinite self; and then this self sins before God." (Pg. 211)

These two books (along with The Concept of Dread) are perhaps Kierkegaard's most profound (certainly the most "pre-existential") works of a Christian nature. Not only Christians can appreciate his deep reflections on such emotional conditions; these works are "must reading" for anyone studying Kierkegaard.