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Download The Wreck of Western Culture: Humanism Revisited eBook

by John Carroll

Download The Wreck of Western Culture: Humanism Revisited eBook
ISBN:
192076917X
Author:
John Carroll
Category:
Philosophy
Publisher:
Scribe; Edition Unstated edition (2004)
EPUB book:
1295 kb
FB2 book:
1232 kb
DJVU:
1556 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
349


Carroll's basic point is that man needs a place to stand, and humanism-putting man at the center of things . So the book recounts 500 years' worth of attempts to fill the hole, either consistently with humanism or in opposition to it.

Carroll's basic point is that man needs a place to stand, and humanism-putting man at the center of things-can't give him one. The analysis rings the changes on a very few themes, like reason and honor and death, which it traces in their various permutations throughout the 500-year humanist period.

Humanism built Western civilization as we know it today. Its achievements include the liberation of the individual. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.

Humanism: The wreck of Western culture. The wreck of Western culture: Humanism revisited. Carlton North: Scribe.

This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. Books. Break-out from the Crystal Palace: The l critique: Stirner, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky. Humanism: The wreck of Western culture. A revised version of Humanism: The wreck of Western culture. The existential Jesus.

Start by marking The Wreck of Western Culture: Humanism Revisited  .

Start by marking The Wreck of Western Culture: Humanism Revisited as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Instead, Carroll articulates a disruptive and compelling alternative narrative of the course of Western civilization since the Renaissance and the Reformation contrived to unleash reason, will, and a superhuman man on the world. This book may end up falling into the "one of the best books I've ever read" category, in which case I will be inflicting passages of it on countless friends and even complete strangers.

Humanism built Western civilisation as we know it today. Its achievements include the liberation of the individual, democracy, universal rights, and widespread prosperity and comfort. Rather he articulates a disruptive and compelling alternative version of Western civilisation since the Renaissance and the Reformation contrived to unleash Reason, Will, and a superhuman Man on the world. Here, Carroll significantly reworks his bracing study of humanism’s rise to pre-eminence and its headlong tumble into contradiction.

Start by marking The Wreck of Western Culture: Humanism Revisited as Want to Read . Australian sociologist John Carroll turns received wisdom on its head in this brilliant, provocative, and sweeping book. Humanism is commonly Features pugnacious prose, expository skillfulness, transgressive wisdom, and mental verve. A passionate, imaginative, richly detailed interpretation of the spiritual history of the modern West.

John Carroll is not concerned about the decline of Western culture; in his mind that ship has sailed

John Carroll is not concerned about the decline of Western culture; in his mind that ship has sailed.

Rare Book
  • Xig
I am convinced that without God the mess will continue to get worse. We need another evangelical revival, but where will it come from?
  • Boraston
wonderful copy and book
  • Moonworm
John Carroll is absolutely knowledgeable in many different areas: medieval arts, modern films, classical theology, modern sociology. Most important of all, he is able to combine the developments of all these fields of knowledge such that he derives his thesis: The Wreck of Western Culture.To be more precise, what he exactly means is, humanism has brought the western culture to a dead end. Today, many people always complain about the social problems they have: suicides, unwanted births, drunkenness, child abuses, cold blood murders and the need for true love, etc. and etc. John Carroll has pointed out the new way in the last sentence on the last page. Read it and think about it. The book deserves much more credit tha it has.
  • Dalarin
There are lots of decline-of-Western-Civ books. This one is brilliant.

Carroll's basic point is that man needs a place to stand, and humanism--putting man at the center of things--can't give him one. So the book recounts 500 years' worth of attempts to fill the hole, either consistently with humanism or in opposition to it.

The analysis rings the changes on a very few themes, like reason and honor and death, which it traces in their various permutations throughout the 500-year humanist period.

The presentation is based on close analysis of literary and artistic works: Holbein's Ambassadors (on the cover) as a representation of the failure of Renaissance humanism, Vermeer's interiors as a depiction of Puritan domestic inwardness, Cezanne's landscapes as a last-ditch attempt to save natural order, and so on.

I found the interpretations--Velasquez's Las Meninas as radically subversive and so on--both startling and persuasive. Sometimes I had my doubts, though. Is Rembrandt's David and Uriah really David and Uriah? Someone's being sent his death, as the author says, but is he an innocent? And was Poussin really the Catholic Counter-Reformation prophet who, had we but followed him, would have saved us through the restoration of liturgical community?

Be those things as they may, the analysis is clear and cogent, and the examples are fascinating in themselves and the use made of them at least plausible and often strikingly illuminating. So read it.

One issue I should mention: the illustrations aren't up to the text, so you should read the book with a computer at hand so you can look up the images on the net.
  • Ventelone
A brilliant and thought provoking book. Found it necessary to write a review after reading a previous 1-star review, which is unrepresentative of the work.
  • Perdana
I shall preface this review with the caveat that I find it difficult to rate this book. Interestingly, when I was half finished with the work, I was sufficiently impressed to order two other titles by the author, his Ego and Soul, and The Existential Jesus. Now, with my reading of Wreck complete, I question these purchases.

It is not simply his pseudo-journalistic presentation of a subject of such monumental importance as the collapse of western culture that I find questionable; I expect and overlook the limited intellectual capacities of those, like Mr. Carroll, who can describe the wounds and sores, explosions, and mortalities of others without proposing remedies for them. Of course, I find offensive the newspaperman's lurid descriptions and the sensationalism that motivates them; I'm sure you do, too. Mr. Carroll writes like a journalist. I am also repelled by the journalist's limited stylistic range of expression, his presumptions of ethical authority, the almost childish glee with which he aggravates his audience--and the output of Mr. Carroll expresses all these limitations. But this work uses these techniques with a much more culpable purpose driving them. This book presents a 275 page anti-eulogy over the death of reason; and it is a grave-song delivered by one dressed not in the robes of a pious or sympathetic man, but one got up in the shorts, sneakers, and, I suspect, man-thong of the hip-hop media star.

Not that Mr. Carroll is without his measure of brilliance, you understand, just that it is an intelligence one would expect of a theater critic, but without the decency to confine itself to the insignificant, where it belongs. The critic's brains are innately trivial, he literally cannot distinguish the judgment of his thumb from the drama he reports. Whatever his impression, however laughable and out of sync it is with the subject he discourse on, he will summon to the very last ounce the resources that his pride and a very smart prep school education has bequeathed him to validate his opinion. The critic will speak of Sloop-doggy-dog in the same glowing terms as he will Mozart: and remain completely unaware of the comedy he puts on in doing it. When Ebert echoes Siskel, I hardly recognize the movie in "the cinema" they describe. And I am completely comfortable in recommending the opposite taste to their's, I need only know that Fool has agreed with Folly, to be right nine of ten debates. It is for the same reasons that I take Mr. Carroll's judgments so suspiciously: not just that he sees in the great visual art of the Renaissance and the movies of John Ford (Rio Grande, for God's sake!) the same level of greatness, or comprehends Shakespeare and Henry James as qualitative literary identities. It is also that he places them all in the same docket for trial. They are reduced to a symptomatology: in the way that fever precedes sweat, and sweat, congestion of the lungs, they are understood as stages of a pneumococcus, one he labels humanism. That in this term he means objectivity is the gist of his book. He condemns objectivity and reason for producing the modern state of mind, one that is faithless, frenetic, and permanently dis-eased. He accuses Munch in the same breath with Caravaggio, for producing modernity, and with it, the "wreck" of the culture. Munch IS modernity, as you, reader of this, are a modern--in your flabby body, your weak, whining mentality, your moody unwillingness to battle your adversaries while they dismantle your world, your expectation that others grant what you have not earned--but Caravaggio IS the culture. Newton is a giant. Copernicus was a window opened upon the stale, frightened world of men living in fear of demons and hell after death. Those times and these times are not the same.

Mr. Carroll not only lacks historical perspective, he triumphs in the ignorance: he does not comprehend nor desire to comprehend, repetitions. The Greeks awoke, spoke, imagined, LIVED. The Romans DIED. The Greeks and Romans together are a history: Greece was REASON, the Greeks invented reason, a weak, uncertain flame that died in the instant it burst forth, but it was reason. The Latins re-established faith, re-founded birth as a condition of right, returned the citizen to slavery, and set up Christ as a king to justify it. 1200 years later, Caravaggio, Newton, Shakespeare denied the legitimacy of this death.

Encore:

And today, we have Mr. Carroll, him that damns reason, in a world that damns reason. Once again, the citizen is being enslaved to the state; once again, the flame of reason is being doused: and there's Mr. Carroll, happily assisting you in this "untergang des abendlandes", the fall of reason into this dark, hopeless, ugly world where light no longer abides, and men are blind.

The blindness of man is of a willful nature: he will not see until he cannot see. Mr. Carroll shuts his eyes and will not open them. Welcome to Mr. Carroll's world. Mr. Carroll lives in Melbourne, in a country crawling with illegal aliens, where his language is under attack, and his culture is crumbling, and the future of his sons is shaken. Still he will not act. The world treats his daughter as a whore, and Mr. Carroll? He denies reason, he has no brain, therefore, to comprehend these things.

So, still, he has no need to act.

tlt-