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by III Bartley

Download Wittgenstein (Modern) eBook
ISBN:
0875484417
Author:
III Bartley
Category:
Philosophy
Language:
English
Publisher:
Open Court; Subsequent edition (February 5, 1999)
Pages:
236 pages
EPUB book:
1309 kb
FB2 book:
1482 kb
DJVU:
1855 kb
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
663


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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Though brief and written so that it can be understood by those with no previous knowledge of Wittgenstein's philosophy.

William Warren Bartley, III (October 2, 1934 – February 5, 1990), known as . Bartley, III, was an American philosopher

William Warren Bartley, III (October 2, 1934 – February 5, 1990), known as . Bartley, III, was an American philosopher. After his doctoral graduation, Bartley worked as a lecturer in logic in London. Later, he held positions at the Warburg Institute and the University of California, San Diego. He was appointed to his first full professorship in 1969, at the University of Pittsburgh, where he had William Warren Bartley, III (October 2, 1934 – February 5, 1990), known as .

Ludwig Josef Johann Wittgenstein (/ˈvɪtɡənʃtaɪn, -staɪn/; German: ; 26 April 1889 – 29 April 1951) was an Austrian-British philosopher who worked primarily in logic, the philosophy of mathematics, the philosophy of mind, and . .

From 1929 to 1947, Wittgenstein taught at the University of Cambridge.

Though brief and written so that it can be understood by those with no previous knowledge of Wittgenstein's philosophy, this book is an important contribution to our understanding of the man and of the development of his thought.

Born in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, on October 2, 1934, Bartley was brought up in a Protestant home. He completed his secondary education in Pittsburgh and studied at Harvard University between 1952 and 1956, graduating with a BA degree in philosophy

by. Bartley, William Warren, 1934-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

by. Wittgenstein, Ludwig, 1889-1951, Wittgenstein, Ludwig, 1889-1951, Filosofen, Philosophes. Uploaded by MerciG on March 24, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Destination, rates & speeds. 8. Wittgenstein (Modern). Published by Open Court (1999). ISBN 10: 0875484417 ISBN 13: 9780875484419. Destination, rates & speeds.

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Bartley III, narrated by Jim Denison. Ludwig Wittgenstein was born in Vienna in 1889 and died in Cambridge, England in 1951. He was one of the most influential philosophers of the 20th century. Though brief and written so that it can be understood by those with no previous knowledge of Wittgenstein's philosophy, this book is an important contribution to our understanding of the man and of the development of his thought.

Download now Wittgenstein Wittgenstein William Warren Bartley II. Download PDF book format. Library of Congress Control Number: 72011755. International Standard Book Number (ISBN)

Download now Wittgenstein Wittgenstein William Warren Bartley II. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Book's title: Wittgenstein. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 0397007515. System Control Number

"The portrait that emerges from this account is human, all too human, but the author's respect for Wittgenstein is never in doubt. Though brief and written so that it can be understood by those with no previous knowledge of Wittgenstein's philosophy, this book is an important contribution to our understanding of the man and of the development of his thought."—Walter Kaufmann
  • Beanisend
W.W. Bartley III is also the author of books such as Werner Erhard The Transformation of a Man: The Founding of EST,Retreat to Commitment, etc. This book was first published in 1973, and revised in 1985; he said in the Preface to the revised version, "the most important addition has been the Afterword on Wittgenstein and homosexuality. This Afterword contains a reply to my critics... and rebuts some attempts to give a psychological explanation of Wittgenstein's philosophical ideas." (Pg. 11) He says in the Introduction, "I have gone to homosexual bars in Vienna and London in search of those who knew Wittgenstein... and I was successful in that search." (Pg. 22)

He notes in the first chapter, "Wittgenstein was baptized in the Roman Catholic faith and was given a Roman Catholic burial... During his First World War army duty... he continued to give his own religion as 'Roman Catholic.' In later years, while stating firmly that he was not an adherent of any organized religion, he nonetheless observed the rituals of organized religions when he encountered them... By descent, as opposed to persuasion, Wittgenstein was three-quarters Jewish." (Pg. 16)

He asserts, "Throughout his life... Wittgenstein was tormented by intense guilt and suffering over his sexual desires and activities." (Pg. 26) He adds, "By walking for ten minutes to the east... he could quickly reach the parkland meadows... where rough young men were ready to cater to him sexually. Once he had discovered this place, Wittgenstein found to his horror that he could scarcely keep away from it... Wittgenstein found that he much preferred the sort of rough blunt homosexual youth that he could find strolling the paths and alleys... to those ostensibly more refined young men who frequented ... the neighborhood bars..." (Pg. 40) He also notes that two of Wittgenstein's brothers "were known to be homosexual." (Pg. 35)

Whe he stood to inherit a large sum of money, "he caused enormous commotion by appearing suddenly at his bankers one morning to declare that he wanted nothing more to do with his money and that it must be disposed of forthwith... with special measures being taken to ensure that none of the money at that time ... should ever come into Wittgenstein's hands." (Pg. 38) Of his time as a village schoolteacher in the 1920s, "The majority of villagers among whom he lived came to regard him and his new teaching methods as dangerously threatening to their way of life." (Pg. 80) He adds, "Many of the schoolchildren, however, adored Wittgenstein. And they taught one another." (Pg. 83)

He admits, "Just how and precisely when Wittgenstein changed his philosophical approach [between the Tractatus and the Philosophical Investigations] provides a historical puzzle that probably cannot be solved." (Pg. 126) Bartley admits on his own account that "I consider the styles and methods of philosophical analysis advocated and practiced by Wittgenstein sometimes useful but quite overrated." (Pg. 156)

Those wanting to know more about perhaps the 20th century's most fascinating philosopher will definitely want to read this book, although I would recommend Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Duty of Genius to counter some of Bartley's positions (notably about Wittgenstein's sexual activities).
  • TheFresh
This is a short and very accessible biography. Wittgenstein tends to be widely and divergently interpreted - which goes with the territory, I suppose: with all that talk about language games, you can't really say he's "misunderstood", but there is little consensus as to what his philosophy really means. Not helped, also, by his later work (encapsulated in the Philosophical Investigations) effectively recanting on the logical formalism of his earlier Tractatus Logico Philosophicus.

Bartley's life does the extremely valuable service of distilling down the central tenets of Wittgenstein to manageable nuggets rendered at a sufficiently remote level of abstraction that a lay reader should be able to digest them comfortably. Much more entertaining than Marie McGinn's rather humourless Guidebook to Wittgenstein and the Philosophical Investigations, for example.

However, this is no dry exposition of the Philosophical Investigations. It is a true biography, covering Wittgenstein's period as an Austrian schoolteacher. Bartley paints a plausible picture of the Philosopher as hermit auteur. He is also obstreporously controversial in writing colourfully of Wittgenstein's taste for a bit of Vienese rough trade in a section which (as Bartley defensively notes in the afterword) occupies just five pages (but it is pretty much the first five!) which appears to have gained this volume some not insignificant literary notoriety on publication in 1973.

These days, a spot of Tyrolian cottaging seems almost somewhat tame, if gratuitous, stuff (tame in that it has almost become more controversial to claim a lifetime literary bachelor was *straight* and gratuitous in that, despite a salutary attempt late on, Bartley makes no real effort to link said saucy tendencies to anything more significant in Wittgenstein's life or work, and in fact in a studiously defensive afterword, explicitly rejects the validity of doing just that. Much of the afterword is written with the air of an author-as-fullback looking suspiciously quizzical and innocent while the subject-as-winger writhes in agony on the ground just inside the penalty box, it never being clear who is more deserving of a booking.

Nonetheless, it's a quick, clear, entertaining read and will be of particular value for those (like me) seeking an overview and context to this important 20th century philosopher, having discovered that an uncontextualised approach on the north face of the Philosophical Investigations without an experienced sherpa and some preparatory reading oxygen, was a bit of a tall order.

Olly Buxton
  • Thohelm
Fantastic book, full of drama in the deepest sense. I just couldn't stop reading it, and hoped that, like Borges' "Book of Sand", it would have no end. The experiences of the philosopher as a teacher in a lost alpine village in Austria are here beautifully and terribly described.