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Download Moral Imagination: Implications of Cognitive Science for Ethics eBook

by Mark Johnson

Download Moral Imagination: Implications of Cognitive Science for Ethics eBook
ISBN:
0226401685
Author:
Mark Johnson
Category:
Philosophy
Language:
English
Publisher:
University Of Chicago Press (July 1, 1993)
Pages:
302 pages
EPUB book:
1621 kb
FB2 book:
1984 kb
DJVU:
1576 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
341


Using path-breaking discoveries of cognitive science, Mark Johnson argues that humans are fundamentally imaginative moral animals, challenging the view that morality is simply a system of universal laws dictated by reason.

Using path-breaking discoveries of cognitive science, Mark Johnson argues that humans are fundamentally imaginative moral animals, challenging the view that morality is simply a system of universal laws dictated by reason. According to the Western moral tradition, we make ethical decisions by applying universal laws to concrete situations.

The book Moral Imagination .

The book Moral Imagination: Implications of Cognitive Science for Ethics, Mark Johnson is published by University of Chicago Press. Using path-breaking discoveries of cognitive science, Mark Johnson argues that humans are fundamentally imaginative moral animals, challenging the view that morality is simply a system of universal laws dictated by reason.

Using path-breaking discoveries of cognitive science, Mark Johnson argues that humans are fundamentally imaginative moral animals, challenging the view that morality is simply a system of universal laws dictated by reason

Using path-breaking discoveries of cognitive science, Mark Johnson argues that humans are fundamentally imaginative moral animals, challenging the view that morality is simply a system of universal laws dictated by reason.

Moral Imagination: Implications of Cognitive Science for Ethics. Moral Imagination - Mark Johnson. Expanding his innovative studies of human reason in Metaphors We Live By and The Body in the Mind, Johnson provides the tools for more practical, realistic, and constructive moral reflection. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. How Cognitive Science Changes Ethics.

Moral Imagination book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Moral Imagination book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Moral Imagination: Implications of Cognitive Science for Ethics as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Author: Mark Johnson. Ethics and Cognitive Science Alvin I. Goldman Ethics, Vol. 103, No. 2. (Ja. 1993), pp. 337-360. Startle Modification: Implications for Neuroscience, Cognitive Science, and Clinical Science. Startle Modification: Implications for Neuroscience, Cognitive Science, and Clinical Science John Dewey and Moral Imagination: Pragmatism in Ethics. The Ekumen cycle is a set of science-fiction books written between 1966 and 2002 by the american author Ursula le Guin. Rev relig res. Mark Johnson.

From a different perspective, the connection between ethics and imagination was recently discussed in Mark Johnson’s book Moral Imagination: Implications of Cognitive Science for Ethics (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994). The author of the influential books Metaphors We Live By and The Body in the Mind, Johnson extends his views on the cognitive role of metaphors and develops an alternative conception of moral reflection-one that is imaginative and constructive rather than rational and based on universal laws.

Johnson, Mark and Lackoff, George. Metaphors We Live By. Chicago: Chicago University Press. Grounding for the metaphysics of morals; with, On a supposed right to lie because of philanthropic concerns. Indianapolis: Hackett. Anthropology, History, and Education. Kimmelman, M. (February 18, 2011). Auschwitz Shifts From Memorializing to Teaching.

Using path-breaking discoveries of cognitive science, Mark Johnson argues that humans are fundamentally imaginative moral animals, challenging the view that morality is simply a system of universal laws dictated by reason. According to the Western moral tradition, we make ethical decisions by applying universal laws to concrete situations. But Johnson shows how research in cognitive science undermines this view and reveals that imagination has an essential role in ethical deliberation.Expanding his innovative studies of human reason in Metaphors We Live By and The Body in the Mind, Johnson provides the tools for more practical, realistic, and constructive moral reflection.
  • Kanrad
Good seller, good product
  • mym Ђудęm ęгσ НuK
book was in great near new condition.
  • Jugami
This is a very important book; though aimed at philosophers and the cognitive science communities, most general readers should enjoy it. Here are several quotes:

"[There is] a deep tension and dissonance within our cultural understanding of morality, for we try to live
according to a view that is inconsistent with how human beings actually make sense of things, I am trying to point out
this deep tension, to diagnose the source of the dissonance, and to offer a more psychologically realistic view of
moral understanding -- a view we could live by and that would help us live better lives." (p.19). "Narrative is not just
an explanatory device, but is actually constitutive of the way we experience things. No moral theory can be
adequate if it does not take into account the narrative character of our experience." (p. 11
  • Vaua
Mark Johnson is a capable writer, who demonstrates the weaknesses of any moral theory that insists on absolutes. In a redundant manner most of the book is about this weakness. However, didn't we already know this? That absolutes were guidelines, helpful rules of thumb, but not always completely applicable. Still it is a very good review (why I gave it three stars). Yet Johnson does not demonstrate that "moral imagination" really gets us anywhere. Is it really any more insightful than the old rules? Johnson takes us up a flight of stairs only to find the door at the top locked.