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Download Closing Of The American Mind - How Higher Education Has Failed Democracy And Impoverished The Souls Of Today's Students eBook

by Allan Bloom

Download Closing Of The American Mind - How Higher Education Has Failed Democracy And Impoverished The Souls Of Today's Students eBook
ISBN:
5551868680
Author:
Allan Bloom
Category:
Philosophy
Language:
English
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster (1987)
EPUB book:
1724 kb
FB2 book:
1537 kb
DJVU:
1199 kb
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
809


The late Allan Bloom's "The Closing of the American Mind" was an unexpected bestseller when it appeared in 1987. Similarly, Professor Bloom finds American education has become overly politicized and attuned to the concerns of the moment.

The late Allan Bloom's "The Closing of the American Mind" was an unexpected bestseller when it appeared in 1987. It is an outstanding work combining polemic against the diminution of American standards with serious thought about how we came to this impasse. Bloom's book is a testament to the power of ideas.

The Closing of the American Mind: How Higher Education Has Failed Democracy and Impoverished the Souls of Today's Students is a 1987 book by the philosopher Allan Bloom.

The Closing of the American Mind: How Higher Education Has Failed Democracy and Impoverished the Souls of Today's Students is a 1987 book by the philosopher Allan Bloom, in which the author criticizes the "openness" of relativism, in academia and society in general, as leading paradoxically to the great "closing" referenced in the book's title. In Bloom's view, "openness" and absolute understanding undermine critical thinking and eliminate the "point of view" that defines cultures

Britannica does not currently have an article on this topic.

Britannica does not currently have an article on this topic. Learn about this topic in these articles: discussed in biography. remembered for his provocative best-seller The Closing of the American Mind: How Higher Education Has Failed Democracy and Impoverished the Souls of Today’s Students (1987). He was also known for his scholarly volumes of interpretive essays and translations of works by Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Plato.

In 1987, eminent political philosopher Allan Bloom published The Closing of the American Mind, an appraisal of contemporary America that hits with the approximate force and effect of electroshock therapy (The New York Times) and has not only been vindicated, but has also become more.

In 1987, eminent political philosopher Allan Bloom published The Closing of the American Mind, an appraisal of contemporary America that hits with the approximate force and effect of electroshock therapy (The New York Times) and has not only been vindicated, but has also become more urgent today. In clear, spirited prose, Bloom argues that the social and political crises of contemporary America are part of a larger intellectual crisis: the result of a dangerous narrowing of curiosity and exploration by the university elites.

Bloom observed that the students had become detached from the great works of literature

Bloom observed that the students had become detached from the great works of literature. These works, based as they are on the critical spirit, have no relevant message in the new amorphous intellectual environment. In 1987, eminent political philosopher Allan Bloom published The Closing of the American Mind, an appraisal of contemporary America that hits with the approximate force and effect of electroshock therapy ( The New York Times) and has not only been vindicated, but has also become more urgent today.

Foreward, Saul Bellow - Students. The clean slate - Books - Music - Relationships - Nihilism, American style

Foreward, Saul Bellow - Students. The clean slate - Books - Music - Relationships - Nihilism, American style. The German connection - Two revolutions and two states of nature - The self - Creativity - Culture - Values - The Nietzcheanization of the left or vice versa - Our ignorance - The university. From Socrates Apology to Heidegger's Rektoratsrede - The Sixties - The student and the university. In this book, the author (a distinguished political philosopher) argues that the social/political crisis of 20th-century America is really an intellectual crisis.

Professor Allan Bloom's prior writings have focused on a translation of classic thought into English. He has translated The Republic of Plato and several writings of Rousseau. Although I have never met Professor Bloom, I would like to. He is obviously a principled scholar

Professor Allan Bloom's prior writings have focused on a translation of classic thought into English. He is obviously a principled scholar. The photograph on the back cover indicates him to be the archetypal professor: kindly, introspective and direct. Moreover, his dedication: "To My Students" further proves that point. Yet the book is an angry book. And, in that sense, it may be the last - or at least a seasoned - reflection of a teacher on his.

And time has been a friend to it. The book presents and reads like the kind of existential revelation that you'd think could . The book presents and reads like the kind of existential revelation that you'd think could only be found at the top of a mountain, or under an apple or Bodhi tree.

THE BRILLIANT AND CONTROVERSIAL CRITIQUE OF AMERICAN CULTURE WITH NEARLY A MILLION COPIES IN PRINT In 1987, eminent political philosopher Allan Bloom published The Closing of the American Mind, an appraisal of contemporary America that hits with th. .

THE BRILLIANT AND CONTROVERSIAL CRITIQUE OF AMERICAN CULTURE WITH NEARLY A MILLION COPIES IN PRINT In 1987, eminent political philosopher Allan Bloom published The Closing of the American Mind, an appraisal of contemporary America that hits with the approximate force and effect of electroshock therapy (The New York Times) and has not only been vindicated, but has also become more urgent today.

A must have, read and keep!! Allan Bloom is a great mind bringing an inside into the American mind set of today; predicted 25 years ago. Read to understand why things are the way they are today and what me (you) can do to prevent being assimilated into or help you escape th. Read to understand why things are the way they are today and what me (you) can do to prevent being assimilated into or help you escape the downward path of "the American mind". оставлен vemmagirl27. Closing of the American Mind. If you want to know why people can't reason anymore read this book. It will boarden your thinking. College has donw so much, but this book goes beyond that. Наиболее популярные в Научная литература

How modern education has failed in modern society.
  • EROROHALO
I have read, in recent memory.
Okay in all honesty I expected this book to be a shallow polemic along the lines of some of the "popular" authors today, pushing an agenda and setting up straw man arguments, to provide an illusion of balance. Bloom, never backs down or even bother to set up "illusory" counter theses to further his, he just piles on the examples, historical as well as contemporary to nail his indictment of the vapidness of modern "Higher Education."
His thesis that the university today, reflects the general detachment of American society from the Puritan moral values that were paramount throughout American history, is conclusion that I would not have put together.
Is this book dated? When I started reading it I would ha e said yes, but as I digest the matter I have just completed, I see in myself the same sins of "culture" and value relativism that he sees as the symptom of the deconstruction of a Liberal education. As a engineering graduate, I hear in my own thoughts of a "superior" education that had very little of the messy humanities as part of my experience. I see that attitude as a shortcoming after reading Bloom, and one that sadly will be difficult to correct. Not that I am going to give up my technical high-paying career to become a philosopher, but I will now be forced to read and reread the very authors that Bloom uses to bolster his argument that it is those questions about values and the role of Man in relation to everything else that is important.
I found myself lost in a sea of ideas that I really had not considered at times and Bloom has the tendency to be over pedantic at times. My lack of depth to fully critique his philosophical and historical arguments provides hope that perhaps I will broaden the depth of my literary and historical perspective as Bloom suggests is the failing of my liberal education.
  • Bukus
I am only about 145 pages into this book, but all I can say is that this is a must-read if you want to understand what is happening in the U.S. today. Bloom lays all this groundwork in 1987, which makes it all the more remarkable since many of the things he discusses have since and even recently come to pass, from our self-absorbed individualism to the use of patriotism as an ever-shifting platform for social indigence. A very thick read. You'll want to go through it like a textbook. But I must say, if I had started out highlighting passages, much of the book would now be yellow as I have shared so much of it with others.
  • Ygglune
G.K. Chesterton is famous for the following paraphrased quip: "An open mind is like an open mouth; its function being to close upon something solid." To the extent that the truth of such priceless wit could be distilled into a single book, Allan Bloom has written that book. And time has been a friend to it.

The book presents and reads like the kind of existential revelation that you'd think could only be found at the top of a mountain, or under an apple or Bodhi tree. From its exaltation of American democracy's founding principles in the spectacular introductory chapter to its implausible deconstruction of the rock 'n' roll music genre (a kind of rhetorical cousin to Richard Weaver's tirade against jazz) to its lengthy discussion of the university, "Closing" pries open your safest intellectual proclivities with a crackling urgency.

But take my advice: read the Afterward first. It does a valuable - for many young readers, I suspect *vital* - service of painting contrasting pictures of Bloom's era in which he first wrote this and the era that defines us today. The context will help, though it will be no substitute for the body of the book.
  • zzzachibis
I would recommend this book highly. It is interesting as a well-written polemic by someone who is not a mere, crass political commentator. It is a fascinating discussion of the history of Western philosophy. It is also an engaging discussion of what Bloom sees as the problems with modern higher education.

I was introduced to Bloom as a masterful translator of Plato's Republic. Bloom's thesis is that university's don't teach well anymore, because of what he describes as vulgar and lazy form of Nietzschian relativism. To make this point he first describes the symptoms of modern students. He then traces the development of Western philosophy that brought us to Nietzsche. He ends by explaining how a vulgarization of Nietzsche bred the sort of vague academic doctrines, most neatly described as various forms of critical theory, which he thinks do not serve the students of Universities.

What this work is, is a refreshing polemic against relativism. What this work is not, is a work of political commentary, though some have described it as such. There is nothing here approaching doctrinaire Left- or Right-wing thought (even of the late eighties, when it was written). Bloom deals with politics but does not move too much beyond Tocqueville's Democracy in America.

The analysis of students is not particularly original and would read like a diatribe of an old-fashioned guy but Bloom's ability to explain this with philosophy. The history of philosophy section is the middle of the book is also its intellectual center. One might not agree with all of his characterizations (of Nietzsche, especially), but it makes for a good analysis and will at least inspire one to read and re-read those older works. The final part deals with the university, and partially rehashes the history with special application to the development of the modern university. This is perhaps the weakest part of the book, only because the arguments had already been built up, and are fairly implicit in the first two thirds of the book.

Some have commented on the book as being difficult to follow because Bloom swerves off topic. I do not think that is fair: Bloom never forgets what he is writing, though he often adopts an ironical tone to illustrate a point, and since this can go one for a few pages, one might forget whether one is reading Bloom's exposition or his mocking of some theory of which he does not approve.

The bigger issue is that he sets up the history of Western philosophy as battles between art-as-creation and science-as-reason. He associates the former with the classical Greeks through to the thinkers of the enlightenment, and the latter with Nietzsche and his influences. He seems to believe that we have gone too far in the direction of the latter. However he never reconciles the two or even suggests such a reconciliation. This is a shame.

The university is not all of life and if one believes that one might still learn and philosophize outside the university, one wants to hear Bloom talk about the art/science dichotomy, rather than throw up his hands in frustration that no one in the modern university appreciates it.

As for a recommendation: if you like reading Nietzsche, you will like this. If you want a political diatribe (Wikipedia says that some people have described this book as starting the American "Culture Wars" -- yeah only for those people who did not actually rad the book) look elsewhere.

Kindle version worked great.