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Download Retirement on the Line: Age, Work, and Value in an American Factory eBook

by Caitrin Lynch

Download Retirement on the Line: Age, Work, and Value in an American Factory eBook
ISBN:
0801477786
Author:
Caitrin Lynch
Category:
Politics & Government
Language:
English
Publisher:
ILR Press; 1 edition (April 17, 2012)
Pages:
240 pages
EPUB book:
1929 kb
FB2 book:
1560 kb
DJVU:
1274 kb
Other formats
rtf mobi doc txt
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
107


Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2012 Caitrin Lynch. CEEOL is a leading provider of academic e-journals and e-books in the Humanities and Social Sciences from and about Central and Eastern Europe.

Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2012 Caitrin Lynch. Retirement on the Line: Age, Work, and Value in an American Factory. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2012. Currently, over 1000 publishers entrust CEEOL with their high-quality journals and e-books.

Retirement on the Line book. In an era when people live longer and want (or need) to work. In Retirement on the Line, Caitrin Lynch explores what this unusual company's commitment to an elderly workforce means for the employer, the workers, the community, and society more generally. Benefiting from nearly five years of fieldwork at Vita Needle, Lynch offers an intimate portrait of the people who work there, a nuanced explanation of the company's hiring practices, and a cogent analysis of how the workers' experiences can inform our understanding of aging and work in the twenty-first century.

The motivations for and experiences of working in retirement are varied and contradictory. This book explores what work means for people in the United States who are of conventional retirement age. To examine issues of aging, work, meaning, and purpose, I focus on Vita Needle Company, a family-owned factory that produces stainless steel needles in the Boston suburb of Needham.

Caitrin Lynch’s book Retirement on the Line: Age, Work .

Caitrin Lynch’s book Retirement on the Line: Age, Work, and Value in an American Factory explores the meanings of work for employees of Vita Needle, a family-owned stainless steel needle factory on the outskirts of Boston, Massachusetts. Working on Vita’s shop floor, side by side with factory employees, enabled the author to produce a rich, nuanced, and insightful piece of anthropological writing that not only explores what work means for peopl. f conventional retirement age (3), but also touches upon broader social issues such as aging, productivity, and work ethic in the contemporary United States.

In an era when people live longer and want (or need) to work past the traditional retirement age, the Vita Needle Company of Needham, Massachusetts, provides inspiration and important lessons about the value of older workers

In an era when people live longer and want (or need) to work past the traditional retirement age, the Vita Needle Company of Needham, Massachusetts, provides inspiration and important lessons about the value of older workers.

com's Caitrin Lynch Page and shop for all Caitrin Lynch books. Retirement on the Line: Age, Work, and Value in an American Factory by Caitrin Lynch (2012-04-17). Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Caitrin Lynch.

Caitrin Lynch is Professor of Anthropology at Olin College

Caitrin Lynch is Professor of Anthropology at Olin College. She is the author of Juki Girls, Good Girls: Gender and Cultural Politics in Sri Lanka's Global Garment Industry and Retirement on the Line: Age, Work, and Value in an American Factory. One fee. Stacks of books. Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline. Bookmate – an app that makes you want to read. Caitrin Lynch,Jason Danely.

In an era when people live longer and want (or need) to work past the traditional retirement age, the Vita Needle Company of Needham, Massachusetts, provides inspiration and important lessons about the value of older workers. Vita Needle is a family-owned factory that was founded in 1932 and makes needles, stainless steel tubing and pipes, and custom fabricated parts. As part of its unusual business model, the company seeks out older workers; the median age of the employees is seventy-four.

In Retirement on the Line, Caitrin Lynch explores what this company's commitment to an elderly workforce means for the employer, the workers, the community, and society more generally. Benefiting from nearly five years of fieldwork at Vita Needle, Lynch offers an intimate portrait of the people who work there, a nuanced explanation of the company's hiring practices, and a cogent analysis of how the workers' experiences can inform our understanding of aging and work in the twenty-first century. As an in-depth study of a singular workplace, rooted in the unique insights of an anthropologist who specializes in the world of work, this book provides a sustained focus on values and meanings―with profound consequences for the broader assumptions our society has about aging and employment.

  • Gann
It's just like a new book. It's in brilliant condition and the price is also reasonable. One of the best second-hand book I ever bought.
  • Axebourne
I can't get this book out of my mind. I had never heard of the Vita Needle Company, but I now see it as an alternate path to a meaningful old age in our culture. My bachelor uncle spent his last ten years in a nursing home, hungry for engagement and meaning in his life. My mother lived her last years in a "retirement community", a not unhappy place, but one in which her age cohort seemed to me to be segregated from our society at large. Isn't there a better alternative? The author, a cultural anthropologist and college professor, spent five years researching this book, part of that time actually working on the line with the seniors. She shares intimate portraits of the employees, of why they are working and what they have gained from this opportunity. She explores whether the company is exploiting the fact that , because these employees are old enough to receive Medicare, it need not pay for health insurance or other benefits. The majority of the employees are part time at relatively low pay, BUT they do receive a generous Christmas bonus that is based on how well the company has done that year (a sort of profit sharing), and their hours are entirely flexible. Some do work because they need the extra money, but many work in order to feel useful again and for the camaraderie they develop with fellow workers. They admit to feeling like a family. The factory, a family owned business begun during the Depression, is successful, despite the fact that they employ more workers than needed to allow for some to be off at any one time, and despite the fact that machines could possibly do some of the tasks. A German film company made a documentary , "Pensioners Inc." , about the company because , in Europe, after retirement age, people can rarely find work. Because the film was seen in other European countries, the company has attracted a steady stream of journalists. Even in this country, this is an unusual business model. With the wave of baby boomers poised to wash across our society, it is perhaps a model that needs to be studied and discussed at length.
  • Landarn
American demographics are changing dramatically. Better health care options, nutrition, and social changes are creating an expanding population aged 65+. "Retirement on the Line" provides hard facts, research & data on this demographic through readable vignettes. Specifically focused on the employer-employee relationship for working in retirement, it highlights the value for each party with a primary study of one employer. The author, an academic, combines economics, sociology and anthropology in this rich study. I look forward to reading her future work contrasting work for someone else (employer) vs. self-employment for the elderly in a field where they have expertise.