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Download Writing The Nation: Self And Country In The Post-colonial Imagination.(Critical Studies 7) eBook

by John C. Hawley

Download Writing The Nation: Self And Country In The Post-colonial Imagination.(Critical Studies 7) eBook
ISBN:
9051839383
Author:
John C. Hawley
Category:
Politics & Government
Language:
English
Publisher:
Brill Rodopi (January 1996)
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1820 kb
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1943 kb
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Электронная книга "Writing the Nation: Self and Country in the Post-colonial Imagination", John C. Hawley.

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Self and Community in the Poetry. 23. Between Here and Over There.

Whose idea of a nation is to prevail throughout these postcolonial territories; whose claims to speak for a people are to be legitimized by international agreement; amid the demands of patriotic rhetoric, what role may be allowed for individual expression that attempts to transcend the immediate political agenda; who may assume positions of authority in defining an ethnic paradigm - such are the questions. Self and Community in the Poetry.

The fourteen essays in this volume contribute significantly to a consideration of the interplay between nation and narration that .

The fourteen essays in this volume contribute significantly to a consideration of the interplay between nation and narration that currently dominates both literary and cultural studies. With the fervent reassertion of tribal domains throughout the world, and with the consequent threat to the stability of a common discourse in putative countries once mapped and subsequently dominated by colonizing powers, the need for such studies becomes increasingly obvious

John C. HAWLEY: Introduction: Voice or Voices in Post-Colonial Discourse? .

John C. HAWLEY: Introduction: Voice or Voices in Post-Colonial Discourse? Rolf LASS: Nigrescent Ganesh: Cultural Nationalism and the Culture of Writing in Chen, Glissant, and . Elaine SAVORY: The Word Becomes Nam: Self and Community in the Poetry of Kamau Brathwaite and Its Relationship to Caribbean Culture and Postmodern Theory. Antonio BENÍTEZ-ROJO: Alejo Carpentier: Between Here and Over There. CHANCY: Léspoua fe viv: Female Identity and the Politics of Textual Sexuality in Nadine Magloire's Le mal de vivre

Self And Country In The Post-colonial Imagination. Critical Studies 7). by John C.

Self And Country In The Post-colonial Imagination. Ethnicity in literature, Nationalism and literature, Culture in literature, Literatures, History and criticism.

Writing the nation: self and country in the post-colonial imagination. The study seeks to underscore what goes behind the writing of 'true' and 'authentic' histories by treating historical fiction as the literary dimension of nationalist ideology. Hawley, J. (E. (1996) Writing the nation: self and country in the post-colonial imagination (Amsterdam, Rodopi). It traces nationalism from its abstract underpinnings to its concrete manifestation in historical fiction which underwrites the Indian freedom struggle.

Colonial and Postcolonial Literature, the leading critical overview of colonial and postcolonial literary studies, is an. .

Colonial and Postcolonial Literature, the leading critical overview of colonial and postcolonial literary studies, is an ideal historical introduction to the field. Find in other libraries.

John Hawley is an American author and professor. His spheres of expertize are Victorian and postcolonial literature, Gender studies, and Intersection between religion and literature. John Hawley started his career in 1977 as an assistant chaplain in Georgetown University Hospital and a year later in Mercy Hospital in Denver, Colorado. From 1979 to 1982 he took the same position at Newman Center at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. John C. Hawley joined the faculty of Santa Clara University in 1986.

He writes that a critical view on literature is the best way to recall liberalism to its first essential imagination  . Literary critic and Princeton professor of English .

Literary critic and Princeton professor of English . Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1996. And What Books Do You Read?': New Studies in Australian Literature.

Against the Tide of Time: Peter Carey's Interpolation into History. Writing the Nation: Self and Country in the Post-Colonial Imagination. Post-Colonial Peter Carey. Prisoners and Spiders Surrounded by Signs: Postmodernism and the Postcolonial Gaze in Contemporary Australian Culture. Eds. Irmtraud Petersson and Martin Duwell.

The fourteen essays in this volume contribute significantly to a consideration of the interplay between nation and narration that currently dominates both literary and cultural studies. With the fervent reassertion of tribal domains throughout the world, and with the consequent threat to the stability of a common discourse in putative countries once mapped and subsequently dominated by colonizing powers, the need for such studies becomes increasingly obvious. Whose idea of a nation is to prevail throughout these postcolonial territories; whose claims to speak for a people are to be legitimized by international agreement; amid the demands of patriotic rhetoric, what role may be allowed for individual expression that attempts to transcend the immediate political agenda; who may assume positions of authority in defining an ethnic paradigm such are the questions variously addressed in this volume.The essayists who here contribute to the discussion are students of the various national literatures that are now becoming more generally available in the West. The range of topics is broad moving globally from the Caribbean and South America, through the African continent, and on to the Indian subcontinent, and moving temporally through the nineteenth century and into the closing days of our twentieth. We deal with poetry, fiction, and theoretical writings, and have two types of reader in mind: We hope to introduce the uninitiated to the breadth of this expanding field, and we hope to aid those with a specialized knowledge of one or other of these literatures in their consideration of the extent to which post-colonial writing may or may not form a reasonably unified field. We seek to avoid the new form of colonialism that might impose a theoretical template to these quite divergent writings, falsely rendering it all accessible and familiar. At the same time, we do note questions and concerns that cross borders, whether these imagined lines are spatial, temporal, gendered or racial.