almediah.fr
» » Waiting for the Barbarians

Download Waiting for the Barbarians eBook

by Lewis Lapham

Download Waiting for the Barbarians eBook
ISBN:
1859848826
Author:
Lewis Lapham
Category:
Politics & Government
Language:
English
Publisher:
Verso (November 17, 1997)
Pages:
230 pages
EPUB book:
1370 kb
FB2 book:
1244 kb
DJVU:
1899 kb
Other formats
mbr doc lit lrf
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
600


a b Wednesday's book: Waiting for the Barbarians by Lewis Lapham (Verso, pounds 17) by Godfrey Hodgson ; in the Independent; published January 14, 1998; retrieved March 7, 2015.

a b Wednesday's book: Waiting for the Barbarians by Lewis Lapham (Verso, pounds 17) by Godfrey Hodgson ; in the Independent; published January 14, 1998; retrieved March 7, 2015. org); retrieved March 7, 2015. Doubling the Point: Essays and Interviews, by David Attwell; published 1992 by Harvard University Press (via Google Books).

Lewis Lapham has served for some time in the role of 'a voice crying in the wilderness'

Lewis Lapham has served for some time in the role of 'a voice crying in the wilderness' doesn't write nearly as well as the Unabomber, and his jeremiad, which is both less intelligent and less original, relies on secondhand sources.

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads. But we still need to pay for servers and staff.

Lewis Lapham received the 1995 National Magazine Award for his essay writing, in which the judges discovered an .

With invective all the more deadly for its grace and wit, Lapham presents the portrait of a feckless American establishment gone large in the stomach and soft in the head.

Waiting for the Barbarians book. Most everything by Lapham is worth reading, if only for his command of English, which I think might be unparalleled among living authors, at least in America

Waiting for the Barbarians book. Most everything by Lapham is worth reading, if only for his command of English, which I think might be unparalleled among living authors, at least in America. Worth having as a reminder of things that have long since fallen into the memory hole.

born into wealth, educated at the finest and I'm sure thru family connections was bestowed his lofty position. A son of Lewis A. Lapham. His grandfather Roger Lapham was mayor of San Francisco, and his great grandfather Lewis P. Lapham was a founder of TEXACO. Grandfather was an overseer of Harvard.

Lewis Lapham takes the title for this elegant collection of sardonic and satirical essays about an American society . It's because the barbarians are coming today and "once the barbarians are here, they'll do the legislating".

Lewis Lapham takes the title for this elegant collection of sardonic and satirical essays about an American society he sees drowning in money from a poem by the Alexandrian Greek poet, C P Cavafy. Why do the senators sit there without legislating?" Cavafy asks.

Title: Waiting for the Barbarians Publisher: Verso Publication Date: 2006 Binding: Hardcover Book Condition: Good. 1. Waiting for the Barbarians. Lewis H. Lapman; Lewis Lapham. An award-winning writer, Lapham sees America's citizenry as complacently taking for granted what has taken 200 years to build. He presents the portrait of a feckless American establishement gone large in the stomach and soft in the head. Seller Inventory 43529. More information about this seller Contact this seller.

After two centuries of experiment with the theories of the Enlightenment and the volatile substances of democracy, America’s leading citizens have come to believe that they have safely arrived at the end of history. Substituting the wonder of money for the work of politics, (a dirty business best left to the hired help), the owners of the nation’s capital take comfort in the rising Dow Jones average (up 2,500 points in the last three years) and complacently assume that the engines of immortal oligarchy require little else except the chores of routine maintenance.Unhappily, the political servants of the corporate state find it increasingly difficult to keep their master’s house in order. Both the Republican and Democratic parties find themselves adrift in scandal, discredited by their means of raising campaign money, suspected of crimes against the common good, convicted of neglecting the poor, despoiling the environment, raffling off the prospects of the country’s long-term future for the promise of a short-term vote.Lewis Lapham received the 1995 National Magazine Award for his essay writing, in which the judges discovered “an exhilarating point of view in an age of conformity”. With invective all the more deadly for its grace and wit, Lapham presents the portrait of a feckless American establishment gone large in the stomach and soft in the head. His acerbic remarks on the 1996 Presidential election take into account Steve Forbes’ primary campaign, the non-candidacy of General Colin Powell, the comings and goings of Dick Morris, Senator Bob Dole’s triumphant return to television as a pitchman for Air France, the building of Hilary Rodham Clinton’s Potemkin village in Iowa, and the sublime vacuity of President Clinton’s inaugural address. A previously unpublished and substantial concluding piece looks at the fate of indolent ruling classes through history.“Our American political classes, being themselves complicit in the well-financed banditry at large in the world, come and go talking of Hilary Clinton’s astrologer and the sins of children’s television, about the wickedness of the National Arts Endowment and Bill Clinton’s Penis. Their insouciance unnerves me. The barbarism implicit in the restless energies of big-time, global capitalism requires some sort of check or balance, if not by a spiritual doctrine or impulse, then by a lively interest in (or practice of) democratic government. The collapse of communism at the end of the Cold War removed from the world’s political stage the last pretense of a principled opposition to the rule of money, and the pages of history suggest that oligarchies unhindered by conscience or common sense seldom take much interest in the cause of civil liberty.”
  • Cashoutmaster
Brilliant Writer,with wit and charm and a good bead on the perils of the classes.
  • Dolid
I bought the book for a friend who told me that it was what he expected. The order process was trouble free and the book arrived in a reasonable time. I haven't learned how my friend likes the book, so I didn't fell that I could give a 5-star rating.

Thanks you,
  • Kazimi
Perfectly satisfied with the transaction. The book condition was as it was described. Will recommend the seller without any hesitation.
  • Unsoo
You don't see Lapham making the list of "25 Billionaires and Millionaires That Became Philanthropists" Google it

You can't, can you, dismiss the irony that Lapham is a very wealthy man, an oil heir....born into wealth, educated at the finest and I'm sure thru family connections was bestowed his lofty position.
A son of Lewis A. Lapham. His grandfather Roger Lapham was mayor of San Francisco, and his great grandfather Lewis P. Lapham was a founder of TEXACO. Grandfather was an overseer of Harvard . Great, great, great grandfather was the Secretary of War in the Jefferson Administration.

In 1972, Lapham married Joan Brooke Reeves, the daughter of Edward J. Reeves, a stockbroker and grocery heir, and his wife, the former Elizabeth M. Brooke (formerly the wife of Thomas Wilton Phipps, a nephew of Nancy Astor). They have three children: Delphina (married Prince Don Bante Maria Boncompagni-Ludovisi) Andrew (married Caroline Mulroney, a daughter of former Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney) Winston

So he can say anything, do anything he wants without fear. Plus I would say that if there was anyone who is out of touch with the "common man" it is Lapham and his fellow top 1%.

I like what he says, regardless if he's being genuine. who knows whether he speaks his heart. Again he is not a philanthropist.
  • Lcena
Lewis Lapham has served for some time in the role of 'a voice crying in the wilderness'. I am often amazed of the breadth of his historical perspective and his currently 'unamerican' willingness, or rather eagerness, to reach below the surface of events and bring to light essences which an informed and engaged electorate need to be conscious of, but will rarely have the opportunity to consider if they rely solely upon the mainstream U S media for information. A Lewis Lapham essay is like a trip to another part of the globe without the jet lag. This collection continues his excellent tradition and the truths contained within, while topical, are timeless in value. If you care about the world and our place in it, and you wish to be challenged to reconsider your assumptions about reality, reading Mr. Lapham is a must.
  • Mr.Champions
Most political books are either so slanted and partisan they induce literary vomiting, or so bland and general they say nothing at all. This book is well written, well researched and just funny. Sarcasm in its highest form paralells the very literature it mocks, and this book succeeds in that. To anyone who enjoys the sport of Americna politics, or just wonders where this democracy-on-prozac is headed, I highly recomend it.
  • Kigul
I picked up "Waiting for the Barbarians" because it was referenced in another book I recently read (Morris Berman's The Twilight of American Culture). However, while I found Berman's book very thoughtful and interesting, Lapham's tome was anything but. It is a collection of essays, most of which are tedious political rants. Occasionally, Lapham does show razor-keen wit lampooning the vanities of politicians, academics, and celebrities, and the general stupidity of modern culture. I particularly enjoyed the essay comparing late '90's America with the Elizabethan era court. I just wish that Lapham had made the rest of "Waiting for the Barbarians" as brilliant a critique as that particular section. Instead, the bulk of the book is spent rehashing the 1996 Presidential primaries and general election (yawn).

I found the Lapham's essay devoted to bashing Robert Bork's Slouching Towards Gomorrah: Modern Liberalism and American Decline a serious case of the pot calling the kettle black. The criticisms by Lapham of Bork's book fit perfectly "Waiting for the Barbarians" IMHO with the minor substitution of the single word "left-wing" for "right-wing" in the last sentence: "a shrill, vain, and arrogant man...[who] doesn't write nearly as well as the Unabomber, and his jeremiad, which is both less intelligent and less original, relies on secondhand sources and borrowed thoughts rather than on his own original observations....His book reads like a collection of notes taken at a series of academic conferences...substituting dogma and abstraction for coherent narrative and historical fact....So serene is his faith in right-wing politics." Yep, that just about sums up my feelings on most of the essays in "Waiting for the Barbarians".

I was very disappointed in "Waiting for the Barbarians" because to me it represents a squandered opportunity for offering up a critique of a society that, as Lapham puts it, "has gone large in the stomach and soft in the head". He offers frustratingly brief glimpses of keen wit and insight but to get to those, I had to wade through page upon page of tedious and dated political ranting. If I wanted to hear that kind of hot air, I'd turn on Rachel Maddow- at least she would be ranting about current events rather than things that happened 15+ years ago...