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by Francis Wheen

Download Idiot Proof: A Short History Of Modern Delusions eBook
ISBN:
1586482475
Author:
Francis Wheen
Category:
Politics & Government
Language:
English
Publisher:
PublicAffairs (June 1, 2004)
Pages:
336 pages
EPUB book:
1387 kb
FB2 book:
1369 kb
DJVU:
1577 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
593


This most necessary book is a must read for all those who want to understand the world we live in.

He has been a contributor to Vanity Fair, The Nation, The New Yorker, The Los Angeles Times, and The Washington Post. He has appeared on Booknotes on C-SPAN and on National Public Radio. This most necessary book is a must read for all those who want to understand the world we live in.

Francis Wheen is strongly critical of Foreign Office minister Baroness Anelay's failure to condemn the torture of Raif Badawi by. .ISBN 0-00-714096-7; in the USA and Canada: Idiot Proof: A Short History of Modern Delusions (2004).

Francis Wheen is strongly critical of Foreign Office minister Baroness Anelay's failure to condemn the torture of Raif Badawi by the government of Saudi Arabia Personal life.

Items related to Idiot Proof: A Short History Of Modern Delusions. Francis Wheen Idiot Proof: A Short History Of Modern Delusions. ISBN 13: 9781586482473. Idiot Proof: A Short History Of Modern Delusions. He has been a contributor to Vanity Fair, The Nation, The New Yorker, the Los Angeles Times, and the Washington Post. From Publishers Weekly

Francis Wheen's new book, How Mumbo-Jumbo Conquered the World: A Short History of Modern Delusions, is.When Jenny Tonge MP asked Tony Blair if he was happy that the Book of Genesis was now being promoted as the most reliable biology textbook, he replied: "Yes.

Francis Wheen's new book, How Mumbo-Jumbo Conquered the World: A Short History of Modern Delusions, is published by Fourth Estate. 1. "God is on our side". George W Bush thinks so, as do Tony Blair and Osama bin Laden and an alarmingly high percentage of other important figures in today's world. In the end a more diverse school system will deliver better results for our children. This is the enfeebling consequence of unthinking cultural and intellectual relativism.

Электронная книга "How Mumbo-Jumbo Conquered the World: A Short History of Modern Delusions", Francis Wheen

Электронная книга "How Mumbo-Jumbo Conquered the World: A Short History of Modern Delusions", Francis Wheen. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "How Mumbo-Jumbo Conquered the World: A Short History of Modern Delusions" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

How Mumbo-Jumbo Conquered the World: A Short History of Modern Delusions. What sets this book by Francis Wheen, who is a columnist for the London Guardian, apart from the others is the literary quality of his writing and his sharp cultural insight

How Mumbo-Jumbo Conquered the World: A Short History of Modern Delusions. What sets this book by Francis Wheen, who is a columnist for the London Guardian, apart from the others is the literary quality of his writing and his sharp cultural insight.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and . What colonised the space recently vacated by notions of history, progress and reason? Cults, quackery, gurus, irrational panics, moral.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. An intellectual call to arms, Francis Wheen’s Sunday Times bestseller is one of 2004’s most talked about books. In 1979 two events occurred that would shape the next twenty-five years. In Britain, an era of weary consensualist politics was displaced by the arrival of Margaret Thatcher, whose ambition was to reassert 'Victorian values'. What colonised the space recently vacated by notions of history, progress and reason? Cults, quackery, gurus, irrational panics, moral confusion and an epidemic of mumbo-jumbo.

Francis Wheen is an author and journalist who was named Columnist of the Year for his contributions to the Guardian. His collected journalism, Hoo-Hahs and Passing Frenzies, won the George Orwell prize in 2003. Country of Publication.

That is the history of the last twenty years. They were less secure, too, as short-term or temporary contracts demolished the tradition of full-time, well-paid and often unionised employment. As the political analyst Kevin Phillips recorded in his influential book The Politics of Rich and Poor (1990), ‘no parallel upsurge of riches had been seen since the late nineteenth century, the era of the Vanderbilts, Morgans and Rockefellers’.

Francis Wheen is a signatory to the Euston Manifesto and a close friend of Christopher Hitchens. 2004) ISBN 0-00-714096-7; in the USA and Canada: "Idiot Proof: A Short History of Modern Delusions" (2004) ISBN 1-58648-247-5. In late-2005 Wheen was co-author, with journalist David Aaronovitch and blogger Oliver Kamm, of a complaint to "The Guardian" after it published a correction and apology for an interview with Noam Chomsky by Emma Brockes.

In 1979 two events occurred that would shape the next twenty-five years. In America and Britain, an era of weary consensus was displaced by the arrival of a political marriage of fiery idealists: Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher transformed politics with a combination of breezy charm and assertive "Victorian values." In Iran, the fundamentalist cleric Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini set out to restore a regime that had last existed almost 1,300 years ago. Between them they succeeded in bringing the twentieth century to a premature close. By 1989, Francis Fukuyama was declaring that we had now reached the End of History. What colonized the space recently vacated by notions of history, progress and reason? Cults, quackery, gurus, irrational panics, moral confusion and an epidemic of idiocy, the proof of which was to be found in every state, every work-place, and every library. In Idiot Proof , columnist Francis Wheen brilliantly evokes the key personalities of the post-political era—including Princess Diana and Deepak Chopra, Osama bin Laden and Nancy Reagan's astrologer—while lamenting the extraordinary rise in superstition, relativism and emotional hysteria over the past quarter of a century. In turn comic, indignant, outraged and just plain baffled by the idiocy of it all, Idiot Proof is a masterful depiction of the daftness of our times and a plea that we might just think a little more and believe a little less.
  • Bludsong
I'll bet Mr. Wheen is the kind of guy who walks into a room and immediately starts looking for things that are not to his taste. For a person of this temperament, being a critic of everything is a good choice of profession - he doesn't like anyone or anybody. His harangues are so relentless, one sentence starts on page 78 and goes for 15 lines, spilling over to finish on page 79.

That being said, the majority of people he criticizes deserve it, and there is a ton of information in this book I wouldn't have found otherwise. Among the deserving victims are:

1) Deepok Chopra, "where the marriage of mysticism and money-making is consummated." Chopra says asinine things like "People who have achieved an enormous amount of wealth are inherently very spiritual."
2) Hillary Clinton, while in the White House, had a live conversation with the spirits of Eleanor Roosevelt & Mahatma Gandhi, with the help of self-styled "sacred psychologist," Jean Houston.
3) Luce Irigaray, a high priestess of the post-modernism movement, denounced Einstein's E=mc squared as a "sexist equation" since "it privileges the speed of light over other less masculine speeds that are vitally necessary to us."
4) Those who empathize with the 9-11 terrorists on the basis that it is somehow America's fault.
5) Al Gore, who can give a teary-eyed tobacco-hating speech about his sister dying of lung cancer, yet brag to tobacco growers that he is one of them.
6) Muslim countries who enforce the "shariah" - the so-called Islamic law - thereby retreating into medieval barbarity. The shariah, he writes, "is not from the Koran, but from the opinions of Islamic jurists in the 8th and 9th centuries when Islam was in one of its imperialist phases. It was they who divided the world into the 'abode of Islam' and the 'abode of war,' equating apostasy with treason despite the Prophet's unequivocal assertion that 'there is no compulsion in religion.'"

One interesting item of a positive note (at least for Carter) is that he has been the only president to warn strategically important countries that further US aid was dependent upon an improvement in their human rights record. It is impressive when a book has as many pearls of diverse information scattered through every page. On more than one occasion, I stopped reading to look up something or someone referred to by Wheen.

Wheen's stated purpose is "to show how the humane values of the Enlightenment have been abandoned or betrayed....Each chapter looks at the application of counter-enlightenment in a different aspect of public life - politics, education, diplomacy, medicine, business, the media." I suppose he accomplishes this, although his entries bounce off walls. Perhaps it is a collection of old essays glued together en route to a deadline. It is still well worth reading, has lots of meat in it, and I recommend it highly.
  • Dusar
It has been very amusing to read the reviews of those who dislike or disparage this book (on this site and elsewhere). Frequently, their complaints betray their disappointment that Wheen has committed the "crime" of attacking their own pet delusions, such as one reviewer who claimed to have no problem with the author's views until he dared to criticize the exalted gospel of the "free market"!

It has always been my experience that truly intelligent people are able to make their ideas crystal clear, when they make the effort to do so. Conversely, those who hide behind vague "deeper meanings" and post-modernist claptrap are really trying to disguise their own lack of intelligence. (They're usually the same people who flunked Maths and Science at school!) Thus, I suspect that those who criticize Wheen for being "shallow" are members of precisely the class of intellectual poseurs who are his targets in this book.

As with any thoughtful dissertation, every reader can say "I wish the author had said more about A and less about B". That is hardly a damning criticism: if you want to discuss "A" further, then why don't YOU write a book about that? Could it be that the reality is that YOU have nothing original to offer on the subject?

The tragic aspect of this book's message is that such a small portion of the population seems consciously aware of the recent "dumbing down" of Western culture. Were that not the case, then the author would surely not have felt the need to write this book! Why should the author be obligated to offer solutions to these problems (as some reviewers have demanded), when the vast majority of people (in the true tradition of "Brave New World") can't even see a problem? Ironically, the very people who complain that Wheen doesn't serve up answers on a plate are those who fall for the promise of the "snake oil" in the first place.

This book is an excellent, humorous and wide-ranging read. If you want something "deeper", then why don't YOU help the world by writing it?
  • Kashicage
Read how easy it seems to fool so many, so much of the time. Funny yet thruthful, serious and well researched.
  • Xlisiahal
Some funny parts but the events are really old. Thatcher? I was like 2 years old. Its hard to get outraged about a few offhanded comments she made.
  • I'm a Russian Occupant
This is a plea for the primacy of reason, not in the domain of the emotions, but in nearly all other domains of life, particularly the public and particularly the modern world. If you've ever felt pressured to "drink the Kool-Aid,", Francis Wheen is your knight in armor. From alien abductions, the power of crystals, and creationism, to Diana-mania (The oxymoronic "People's Princess"), the Ponzi schemes of the dot.com "revolution" in economics, and the absurdities of post-modern thought, every witless, half-baked, stupidity of modern life falls to the author's rather sharp sword. Yet he is not arguing for the rightness of any particular social, political, or economic view; he is, however, arguing most passionately (in an intellectual sense) for putting every opinion (left, right, and center) to the test of reason. In short, this is a spirited defense of the Project of the Enlightenment - the quest to understand the world and our place in it through the mind, through reason. And to that, I say bravo.