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Download Foreign Intervention in Africa: From the Cold War to the War on Terror (New Approaches to African History) eBook

by Elizabeth Schmidt

Download Foreign Intervention in Africa: From the Cold War to the War on Terror (New Approaches to African History) eBook
ISBN:
0521882389
Author:
Elizabeth Schmidt
Category:
Politics & Government
Language:
English
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press (March 25, 2013)
Pages:
284 pages
EPUB book:
1933 kb
FB2 book:
1509 kb
DJVU:
1880 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
300


Foreign Intervention in Africa chronicles the foreign political and military interventions in Africa during the periods of decolonization (1956-1975) and the Cold War (1945-1991), as well as during the periods of state collapse (1991-2001) and the "global war on terror" (2001-2010). In each of these cases, external interests altered the dynamics of Africa's internal struggles, escalating local conflicts into larger conflagrations, with devastating effects on African peoples.

Foreign Intervention in Africa chronicles the foreign political and military interventions in Africa during the periods of decolonization (1956-1975) and the Cold . Series: New Approaches to African History. File: PDF, . 2 MB. Читать онлайн.

Foreign Intervention in Africa chronicles the foreign political and military interventions in Africa during the periods of decolonization (1956-1975) and the Cold War (1945-1991), as well as during the periods of state collapse (1991-2001) and the "global war on terror" (2001-2010). In the first two periods, the most significant intervention was extra-continental.

Foreign Intervention in Africa chronicles the foreign political and military interventions in Africa during the periods of decolonization (1956-1975) and the Cold War (1945-1991) . The United States, the Soviet Union, China, Cuba, and the former colonial powers entangled themselves in countless African conflicts. The global war on terror, like the Cold War, increased the foreign military presence on the African continent and generated external support for repressive governments.

Cold War in Africa - Продолжительность: 4:59 Cold War In Africa 7 397 . Why African Countries Can't Be Like Singapore?

Why African Countries Can't Be Like Singapore?

Foreign Intervention in Africa. New Approaches to African History

Foreign Intervention in Africa. New Approaches to African History. Część 7. Elizabeth Schmidt25 marca 2013. She is the author of Cold War and Decolonization in Guinea, 1946958 (2007), which received the African Politics Conference Group's 2008 Best Book Award, and Mobilizing the Masses: Gender, Ethnicity, and Class in the Nationalist Movement in Guinea, 1939958 (2005), which received Alpha Sigma Nu's book award for history in 2008.

While the Global War on Terror (GWOT) aimed to eradicate terrorists, it also allegedly .

While the Global War on Terror (GWOT) aimed to eradicate terrorists, it also allegedly claimed another casualty - independent media coverage of foreign policy - a key component of the CNN effect. The deepening of Africa's multilayered development crisis, and the horrific roll It is taking on millions of lives, is almost Ignored as the world's attention is riveted on the collapse of Soviet Empire.

By Elizabeth Schmidt. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013

By Elizabeth Schmidt. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Elizabeth Schmidt enables us to better understand the causes and consequences of Foreign Intervention in Africa through her simple but elegant categorization and periodization of historical developments since the advent of independence. Her analysis provides a much needed service because she goes beyond a mere narrative to provide a moral perspective on the motives and interests of the interveners and the damage that they have done to ordinary Africans.

whole, foreign interventions in Africa from 1945 to 2010 have done more .

whole, foreign interventions in Africa from 1945 to 2010 have done more harm than good. Given the previous chapters and the information presented within them, these are well supported and serve as an excellent summation of the importance of the work. Overall, this book should be essential reading for all students of Africa, decolonization, or foreign military interventions. It is an invaluable introduction that will also hold new perspectives even for a veteran reader.

Foreign Intervention in Africa chronicles the foreign political and military interventions in Africa during the periods of decolonization (1956-1975) . Elizabeth Schmidt is Professor of History at Loyola University Maryland.

The global war on terror, like the Cold War, increased the foreign military presence on the African continent and generated external . Schmidt’s book is an excellent synthesis of the past 70 years of African history and politics.

The global war on terror, like the Cold War, increased the foreign military presence on the African continent and generated external support for repressive governments. In each of these cases, external interests altered the dynamics of internal struggles, escalating local conflicts into larger conflagrations, with devastating effects on African populations. Her book is provocative, thoughtful and passionate. It is a superb book for students, general readers as well as scholars.

Foreign Intervention in Africa chronicles the foreign political and military interventions in Africa during the periods of decolonization (1956-1975) and the Cold War (1945-1991), as well as during the periods of state collapse (1991-2001) and the "global war on terror" (2001-2010). In the first two periods, the most significant intervention was extra-continental. The United States, the Soviet Union, China, Cuba, and the former colonial powers entangled themselves in countless African conflicts. During the period of state collapse, the most consequential interventions were intra-continental. African governments, sometimes assisted by powers outside the continent, supported warlords, dictators, and dissident movements in neighboring countries and fought for control of their neighbors' resources. The global war on terror, like the Cold War, increased the foreign military presence on the African continent and generated external support for repressive governments. In each of these cases, external interests altered the dynamics of Africa's internal struggles, escalating local conflicts into larger conflagrations, with devastating effects on African peoples.
  • Zieryn
The author appears to believe that United States was instigator of the main problems in Africa. Cuba and the USSR we're not instigators . A lot of rhetoric by a naive author. She obviously was not there during the Cold War as I was .
  • Andronrad
Professor Schmidt has written a very clear, powerful review of the often troubled relationship between independent sub Saharan Africa, its former colonizers and the United States.
In addition to educating the reader about events, actors and consequences linked to this period Professor Schmidt's book is a sobering reminder of the challenges the continent still faces with continued economic interests she identifies here still driving policies and actions of powerful countries outside of Africa and African leadership for the most part, still not up to the challenge.