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Download When Skateboards Will Be Free: A Memoir eBook

by Saïd Sayrafiezadeh

Download When Skateboards Will Be Free: A Memoir eBook
ISBN:
0385340699
Author:
Saïd Sayrafiezadeh
Category:
Politics & Government
Language:
English
Publisher:
Dial Press Trade Paperback (March 30, 2010)
Pages:
320 pages
EPUB book:
1750 kb
FB2 book:
1366 kb
DJVU:
1356 kb
Other formats
mbr txt doc mobi
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
987


Said Sayrafiezadeh has a wry, deadpan sense of humor, an exceptionally open heart, and the wisdom of a true outsider. When Skateboards Will Be Free shows us exactly how he came into possession of these rare qualities. This is a fantastic, beautifully written memoir.

Said Sayrafiezadeh has a wry, deadpan sense of humor, an exceptionally open heart, and the wisdom of a true outsider. Scott Smith, author of A Simple Plan and The Ruins. When Skateboards Will Be Free is a brave, honest and elegant book. It felt like the story was being whispered in my ear. I haven't read a memoir in quite a while that has so skillfully made sense of an American childhood.

Saïd Sayrafiezadeh’s memoir is unforgettable. I was really excited to read this book. I love learning about the struggles of anyone who grew up "other," and Saïd is "other" like crazy: half Iranian, half Jewish American, and raised a militant Socialist in 1980s Pittsburgh.

Saïd Sayrafiezadeh remembers his childhood with surprising compassion for both his mostly-absent Iranian father . Saïd Sayrafiezadeh tells his story with wit, honesty and insight. This book is highly recommended, and a good read. Keen-eyed, deeply-felt. Published by Thriftbooks.

Saïd Sayrafiezadeh remembers his childhood with surprising compassion for both his mostly-absent Iranian father and his depressed Jewish-American mother, especially given the trauma that was inflicted upon him as a child and as a young man by their chance encounter with, and subsequent devotion to, the Socialist Worker's Party. com User, 10 years ago. This is a powerful memoir on many levels.

Once the revolution comes, my mother said, everyone will have a skateboard, because all skateboards will be free. Then she took me by the hand and led me out of the store. I pictured in precise detail a world of long, rolling, grassy hills, where it was always summertime and boys skateboarded up and down the slopes. I’m ready to eat grapes, I said. I said it as plainly as she had. She closed the book she was reading and looked down at me quizzically. You can’t eat grapes, she said.

Saïd Sayrafiezadeh /sɑːˈiːd ˌsɛərəfiˈzɑːdeɪ/ (born 1968) is an American memoirist, playwright and fiction writer living in New York City. He won a 2010 Whiting Award for his memoir, When Skateboards Will Be Free

Saïd Sayrafiezadeh /sɑːˈiːd ˌsɛərəfiˈzɑːdeɪ/ (born 1968) is an American memoirist, playwright and fiction writer living in New York City. He won a 2010 Whiting Award for his memoir, When Skateboards Will Be Free. His short-story collection, Brief Encounters With the Enemy, was short-listed for the 2014 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for debut fiction. He serves on the board of directors for the New York Foundation for the Arts.

Saïd Sayrafiezadeh’ s memoir is unforgettable

The revolution is not only inevitable, it is imminent. It is not only imminent, it is quite imminent. Saïd Sayrafiezadeh’ s memoir is unforgettable.

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Mobile version (beta). When Skateboards Will Be Free: A Memoir of a Political Childhood. Download (epub, 334 Kb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF.

And when the time comes, my father will lead it. Saïd Sayrafiezadeh's Iranian-born father and American Jewish mother had one thing in common: their unshakable conviction that the workers' revolution was coming. Separated since their son was nine months old, they each pursued a dream of the perfect socialist society. Bouncing with his mother between makeshift Pittsburgh apartments, falling asleep at party meetings, longing for the luxuries he's taught to despise, Saïd waits for the revolution that never, ever arrives.

I HARBOR FANTASTICAL DREAMS OF becoming a famous actor. Dreams born when I yelled twenty-five years earlier about going to the zoo and seeing storks. back to New York City, why I never try for any sort of promotion at work because I’ve convinced myself that any additional responsibility will interfere with my true aspiration. With the notable exception of having been on the soap opera Another World for six episodes, I’ve had almost no success

“The revolution is not only inevitable, it is imminent. It is not only imminent, it is quite imminent. And when the time comes, my father will lead it.”With a profound gift for capturing the absurd in life, and a deadpan wisdom that comes from surviving a surreal childhood in the Socialist Workers Party, Saïd Sayrafiezadeh has crafted an unsentimental, funny, heartbreaking memoir.Saïd’s Iranian-born father and American Jewish mother had one thing in common: their unshakable conviction that the workers’ revolution was coming. Separated since their son was nine months old, they each pursued a dream of the perfect socialist society. Pinballing with his mother between makeshift Pittsburgh apartments, falling asleep at party meetings, longing for the luxuries he’s taught to despise, Said waits for the revolution that never, ever arrives. “Soon,” his mother assures him, while his long-absent father quixotically runs as a socialist candidate for president in an Iran about to fall under the ayatollahs. Then comes the hostage crisis. The uproar that follows is the first time Saïd hears the word “Iran” in school. There he is suddenly forced to confront the combustible stew of his identity: as an American, an Iranian, a Jew, a socialist... and a middle-school kid who loves football and video games. Poised perfectly between tragedy and farce, here is a story by a brilliant young writer struggling to break away from the powerful mythologies of his upbringing and create a life—and a voice—of his own. Saïd Sayrafiezadeh’s memoir is unforgettable.From the Hardcover edition.
  • FLIDER
There have been a number of articles in recent years criticizing the apparent trend of publishing books which are memoirs of rather young people.I'm sympathetic to this line of criticism but see it as refuted in part by books like this.Sayrafiezdeh comes from a very unusual background.His father is an Iranian immigrant to the U.S.presumably from a Muslim background.His mother an American Jew whose brother was the fairly well known writer Mark Harris.Unfortunately for everyone concerned the two of them joined ,one could say converted, to the Socialist Workers Party.
The SWP is a rather fascinating organization.At one time it actually had some credibility on the Left as an organizing force.No one disputes that it did impressive work in organizing Anti Vietnam War protests.However by the time the author was born I think it may already have been in the process of shedding any intellectual and political credibility that it had.Strangely enough the worm of decay may have been Cuba.The party was an active booster of the Cuban Revolution and at first this made this rather fusty old Trotskyite party seem "relevant".However if there is a law of left wing politics it is this , one Trotskyite party breeds many.The partys Cuba fixation lead to all kinds of arcane disputes and splits.Shortly before Said S. was born a major split took place in which ,it's my impression ,the party faction that thought Cuba was really a deformed workers state rather than a true workers state split off.This seems to have fueled the partys evolution into the American Castro Cheerleading Society.This in turn alienated a lot of Trots who were willing to support Castro but only critically.The fatal blow seems to have been the turn to labor when the party began to insist that educated white collar workers abandon there jobs to go work in factories often in distant locales.Hundreds(and that's a lot for a little party) of the best educated party members left.
Said S doesn't go into all of the political history and you can't blame him.He wasn't writing a history of the party.However the book might have gained from this.I think it explains something.When I was reading SKATEBOARDS I couldn't help but notice how Moonie like the SWP people sound.I don't think they were as zombiesh even as late as the mid 70's.My theory is that the more independent minded and intellectually serious members of the party were gone by the time Said was say 8 or 9.What was left was a cult remenant that included his mother and father.Although even his mother couldn't take it past a certain point.
In all events this is a compelling story of an American counter culture most Americans have never even heard of.
  • Opithris
A sad memoir of a boy who grows up with hapless, self absorbed Socialist Workers Party parents. A quick and enjoyable read. What was missing for me was how the author resolved the conflicting messages he received.
Interesting passages are when he has a little friend over for lunch who argues with his Mother about capitalism vs. communism. The child clearly knows which he prefers but the mother will not back down, even with a child. And when Said realizes his father knows nothing of the details of the socialist stories he recounts, but only the rhetoric.
A good read but lacking in introspection.
  • Cerar
Unlike my brother and sister and even my mother I kept my unpronounceable last name because it was my only connection with my father. Thus writes Said who is born in New York and brought up in Pittsburgh from an American Jewish mother and a socialist Iranian father who never integrates with America and leaves his family when Said was nine months old.

As a child he is poor and lonely and these conditions make an unusually deep impression on his sensitive mind
With great clarity and insight he describes the small circle of strangers who make up for the absence of family.
If you enjoy reading memoirs this is the one to read
  • Zololmaran
This is my FAVORITE memoir ever! I adore the author's style of writing and admire the way in which he weaves his adult and childhood experiences so that the reader truly feels how his childhood has shaped him.
A wonderful read, and one I've dipped into many times and never cease to be delighted at the story, the style and the author!
  • Jube
It was a cringe worthy revelation to the mind set of the hard core socialist believer. The circular socialist value system the author describes self justifies it's faults and failures by blaming the society it parasitizes. I didn't know that socialists encourage shoplifting from small businesses to "hasten the fall of capitalism". It's the fault of the business owner of course.

Mr. Sayrafiezadeh, you are an amazing example of the resilience of children. Your book is very well written and your stories are poignant.
  • Sadaron above the Gods
The world of an American child growing up amidst urban poverty in the 1970s with educated parents who are zealous members of a fringe communist party.

The father is largely absent while fighting for revolution (here and in Iran) and the mother is a true believer who lives for the perfect future state while assigning her own children to a highly imperfect present.

The author, Mr. Sayrafiezadeh, a product of mixed religious and cultural backgrounds, is a highly talented writer. His story reaffirms the resiliency that is at the healthy core of the human condition.

(The book benefits from an excellent jacket design by The Heads of State. Whoever or whatever that is.)
  • Darkraven
As more than one reviewer has astutely pointed out, despite Sayrafiezadeh's positively Dickensonian childhood, he has emerged as bright new "voice" in the book world--scarred but without rancor. I'd like to commend Said for his positively other-worldly ability to maintain a remarkably balanced view of life, which seemingly would be impossible--given the circumstances of his upbringing. He is also a fine writer. And a word to the reader, once in a great while, the saddest of stories can have a happy ending.