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Download The Cure for Our Broken Political Process: How We Can Get Our Politicians to Resolve the Issues Tearing Our Country Apart eBook

by Lawrence Susskind,Sol Erdman

Download The Cure for Our Broken Political Process: How We Can Get Our Politicians to Resolve the Issues Tearing Our Country Apart eBook
ISBN:
159797269X
Author:
Lawrence Susskind,Sol Erdman
Category:
Politics & Government
Language:
English
Publisher:
Potomac Books (October 1, 2008)
Pages:
216 pages
EPUB book:
1320 kb
FB2 book:
1280 kb
DJVU:
1717 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
215


Our nation faces unprecedented challenges, yet our politicians spend most of their energy attacking one another. To anyone who fears that our country’s future is in peril, The Cure offers a realistic path to a political process they can genuinely believe i. .

Our nation faces unprecedented challenges, yet our politicians spend most of their energy attacking one another. All the while, no one in public life has offered a practical way to neutralize the bitter partisanship that paralyzes Washington. The Cure for Our Broken Political Process fill Record numbers of Americans fear that our political process is broken-for good reason. Our nation faces unprecedented challenges, yet our politicians spend most of their energy attacking one another.

Our nation faces unprecedented challenges, yet our politicians spend most o.The full title of this book is The Cure for Our Broken Political Process: How We Can Get Our Politicians to Resolve the Issues Tearing Our Country Apart by Sol Erdman and Lawrence Susskind.

Sol Erdman and Lawrence Susskind base their case on their decades of experience in resolving political conflict

Sol Erdman and Lawrence Susskind base their case on their decades of experience in resolving political conflict. The Cure for Our Broken Political Process begins with hard evidence that our country could work out practical solutions to nearly every major issue that now divides us, solutions that all sides could support. Why, then, don’t our politicians seek out those solutions? The authors debunk all the accepted explanations and then uncover the real reason

how we can get our politicians to resolve the issues tearing our country apart. Could politicians negotiate the best solutions? Why our lawmakers betray us. Each lawmaker's predicament: whom do I represent? How did American politics get so dysfunctional?

how we can get our politicians to resolve the issues tearing our country apart. 1st ed. by Sol Erdman. Each lawmaker's predicament: whom do I represent? How did American politics get so dysfunctional? Each district as diverse as the whole USA. Why do most voters feel so powerless? While most of us sleep, Congress does its worst. Does the current system threaten our survival? Big changes can happen. How ideologically diverse do we want our politicians to be?

Our nation faces unprecedented challenges, yet our politicians spend most of their . Books related to CURE FOR OUR BROKEN POLITICAL, THE. Skip this list. The Cure for Our Broken Political Process fills that void. The Cure begins with hard evidence that our country could work out practical solutions to nearly every major issue that now divides us, solutions that all sides could support.

Sol Erdman, The Cure for Our Broken Political Process: How We Can Get Our Politicians to Resolve the Issues Tearing Our Country Apart (Potomac Book, 2008)

Sol Erdman, The Cure for Our Broken Political Process: How We Can Get Our Politicians to Resolve the Issues Tearing Our Country Apart (Potomac Book, 2008). Daniel C. Esty, Green to Gold: How Smart Companies Use Environmental Strategy to Innovate, Create Value, and Build Competitive Advantage (Yale University Press, 2006). Fred Krupp and Miriam Horn, Earth: The Sequel: The Race to Reinvent Energy and Stop Global Warming (W. W. Norton, 2008).

Good evening, my fellow Americans. My special thanks go to them for the opportunity of addressing you this evening

The wind had shifted from our backs to our faces, and we needed to.First, with limited effort, we can now spend more time getting to know the people who apply for jobs at Goldman Sachs.

The wind had shifted from our backs to our faces, and we needed to respond. How many qualified candidates were at a school became more important than who were the most talented students regardless of their school. However, we knew that candidates didn’t have to attend Harvard, Princeton, or Oxford to excel at Goldman Sachs-our leadership ranks were already rich with people from other schools.

Record numbers of Americans fear that our political process is broken―for good reason. Our nation faces unprecedented challenges, yet our politicians spend most of their energy attacking one another. All the while, no one in public life has offered a practical way to neutralize the bitter partisanship that paralyzes Washington.The Cure for Our Broken Political Process fills that void. The authors show exactly how concerned citizens can get politicians from all camps to negotiate genuine solutions to the most vexing issues. Sol Erdman and Lawrence Susskind base their case on their thirty years of experience in resolving political conflict.The Cure begins with hard evidence that our country could work out practical solutions to nearly every major issue that now divides us, solutions that all sides could support. Why, then, don’t our politicians seek out those solutions? The authors debunk all the accepted explanations and then uncover the real reason. By telling the story of a concerned citizen who runs for Congress, the book shows that two basic features of our elections virtually compel politicians to bicker endlessly over major problems. So, as long as our elections work as they do today, our lawmakers will keep on fighting, leaving the critical issues unresolved.The authors then spell out how to redesign elections so that politicians would win only if they produced useful results―only if they negotiated practical solutions to pressing problems. The book concludes with a step-by-step plan proving that ordinary citizens have the power to bring about these changes. To anyone who fears that our country’s future is in peril, The Cure offers a realistic path to a political process they can genuinely believe in.
  • watching to future
I am about half way through "the Cure." What I find of value is the idea that if antagonists first look at goals, then what the other is saying or promoting, and finally at particulars, there is a chance to find a common ground of understanding and perhaps find a way to see if any goals are also in common. The particulars fall from that. This, as a programmer, I would declare to be top-down programming. "I know my requirements. I understand the processes to get there. I will be surprised by the basic steps that lead back to the top. Wow! I get to be surprised by my own invention! How invigorating!"

In programming, it seems to take an intermixed combination of Top Down and Bottom Up approaches to develop a vibrant, flexible bit of software. These conceptual approaches were not available to the framers of the U.S. Constitution and were likely outside the purview of Susskund and Erdman. Somehow, all of them understood that negotiations were essential to any equitable governance.

It is possible to find paths to acceptable solutions but, and this is a most important but, all sides have to be willing to acknowledge that the other person has some valid points and those points are worth considering. If one side or faction refuses to negotiate then this plan must fail. That result has to be analyzed and the `Refuseniks' should be held accountable. While some believe they have the one, true path, others see more broadly that different views exist. "The Cure" is a grand vision that seeks to find some pathways.

We need to send 535 copies to the voting members of Congress. We need to finally acknowledge that we really are not privy to the `revealed wisdom.'
  • Bloodfire
I certainly agree with the author that the system isn't working. The solution offered is innovative and well thought out. I hope the Center for Collabrative Democracy gets a chance to try out their idea on a local level. I think anyone discouraged with politics as usual is going to find this an interesting read.
  • Ishnsius
If you're worried about the future of this country, you need to read this book. The authors give the most convincing explanation I've ever read for why our politicians behave so perversely. The authors then offer a practical solution for our broken political system. After reading The Cure, I believe that we could make enormous headway on our most pressing problems - and in ways that Americans across the spectrum could support. To top it off, The Cure is a pleasure to read. Imagine a book on politics that's a page-turner.
  • Malogamand
The full title of this book is The Cure for Our Broken Political Process: How We Can Get Our Politicians to Resolve the Issues Tearing Our Country Apart by Sol Erdman and Lawrence Susskind. Despite the overly long title, it's actually a fairly quick read and written in a style accessible to the average reader.

The premise of the book is that Americans are uninvolved in the political process because they feel their votes don't matter, their perspectives aren't represented in Congress and the current system results in such gridlock that nothing ever gets done. To remedy this, the authors have a number of ideas, but the centerpiece of the book is Personally Accountable Representation.

Personally Accountable Representation (PAR) consists of a few elements, the major ones being as follows:

- Preferential ballots. Rather than "winner takes all," we would rank our preferred candidates and there would be a handful of winners, likely broken into a third liberals, a third moderates and a third conservatives.
- Expanded districts with more representatives. Three representatives per district would likely be ideal to improve the chances of one representative being close to your perspective.
- Self-selected constituents. After an election, each voter gets a card listing the winners. The voter then has the option of returning that card to the representative who best represents them. They would then receive regular updates from that representative and hold that individual accountable.

There are many other elements, but those stand out. Presumably, implementation of PAR at the House level (Constitutional roadblocks prevent its use for Senate elections) would result in an electorate that is more involved in the political process, a greater sense of citizens being represented, increased accountability in government, and less legislative gridlock.

These objectives are lofty--and the authors admit as much--but their hope is that these principles will take root at the grassroots level. In time, once people have seen the effectiveness in the local school councils, board rooms, city government, etc., it is hoped that they will demand change at the state and national levels.

So would it work?

Tough to say. They make a compelling argument. I'll admit I was a bit skeptical about this book before reading it. Last year's election was long on style but short on substance, and I was tempted to lump this in with the other "change for the sake of change" notions floating around. PAR has some merit, though, and the authors have gone to great lengths to discuss the pros and cons and look at ways of mitigating many of the cons.

I think the bottom line is that PAR probably couldn't hurt. Increased voting for its own sake is of little value. Frankly, I'd like fewer people voting if those who did would educate themselves. If PAR succeeded in increasing people's knowledge about candidates and motivated them to stay informed and hold their elected officials accountable, it could be a great thing. For me that's the strongest argument for such a system. Gridlock in Congress, on the other hand, is a mixed bag. With government as bloated as it is, a bit of inaction on the part of the Big Spenders is not necessarily a bad thing.

Simply from a writing perspective, The Cure was very effective. After a short intro, the book is primarily dialog between legislators and their staff (semi-fictional) hashing out ways to improve the political system. This works well and keeps a potentially dry topic interesting. Beyond that, there is a wealth of demographic and other data, as well as an extensive appendix full of expansions of some of the ideas, stories of similar ideas tried elsewhere, etc.

All in all, I'd say Erdman and Susskind have done an admirable job of applying their years of experience in mediation to the political process. The Cure for Our Broken Political Process will likely appeal most to independents who've traditionally not been well represented but would be a good read for anyone interested in politics. If nothing else, it will get likely get you thinking in fresh ways about how we got here politically and what we can do about it.