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Download Holding the Ground: The Nationalist Party in Northern Ireland, 1945-72 eBook

by Brendan Lynn

Download Holding the Ground: The Nationalist Party in Northern Ireland, 1945-72 eBook
ISBN:
1855219808
Author:
Brendan Lynn
Category:
Politics & Government
Language:
English
Publisher:
Routledge; 1 edition (May 28, 1997)
Pages:
286 pages
EPUB book:
1771 kb
FB2 book:
1481 kb
DJVU:
1245 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
151


Nationalist Party (Northern Ireland). CAIN: Politics: Lynn, B. (1997), Holding the Ground the Nationalist Party in Northern Ireland, 1945–1972". Retrieved 18 April 2010.

Nationalist Party (Northern Ireland).

O'Connor was elected at the 1949 Northern Ireland general election for West Tyrone, and held his seat at each subsequent . Brendan Lynn, Holding the Ground: The Nationalist Party in Northern Ireland, 1945 - 72 (1997), ISBN 1-85521-980-8.

O'Connor was elected at the 1949 Northern Ireland general election for West Tyrone, and held his seat at each subsequent election, until the Parliament of Northern Ireland was abolished in 1972. In 1958, he worked with Eddie McAteer to prevent the Nationalist Party becoming the official opposition at Stormont. When, in 1965, they finally accepted the role, O'Connor became the Opposition Chief Whip and the Shadow Minister of Home Affairs References.

Find sources: "1945 in Northern Ireland" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (July 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template . Holding the Ground: The Nationalist Party in Northern Ireland, 1945-72. Aldershot: Dartmouth.

Find sources: "1945 in Northern Ireland" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (July 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message).

Nationalism in Northern Ireland in the late 1950s was dominated by the Nationalist Party ^ a b c d e Brendan Lynn, Holding the Ground: The Nationalist Party in Northern Ireland, 1945 - 72 (1997).

Nationalism in Northern Ireland in the late 1950s was dominated by the Nationalist Party. a b c d e Brendan Lynn, Holding the Ground: The Nationalist Party in Northern Ireland, 1945 - 72 (1997), ISBN 1-85521-980-8.

Lynn, Brendan, Holding the Ground’: The Nationalist Party in Northern Ireland, 1945-72 (Belfast, 1997). Maginnis, Ken, Disarmament: Pathway to Peace (Belfast, 1999). Maille, E. and D. McKittrick, The Fight for Peace: The Secret Story of the Irish Peace Process (London, 1996). ‘Many roads forward: politics and ideology within the Progressive Unionist Party’, Etudes Irlandaises, 25, 1 (Spring, 2000), pp. 173-192. McAllister, . The Social Democratic and Labour Party (London, 1977).

The Nationalist Party† - was the continuation of the Irish Parliamentary Party, and was formed after partition, by the . (1997), Holding the Ground the Nationalist Party in Northern Ireland, 1945-1972".

The Nationalist Party† - was the continuation of the Irish Parliamentary Party, and was formed after partition, by the Northern Ireland-based members of the IPP. The Nationalist Party didn't enter the House of Commons of Northern Ireland until 1924, having won six seats in the general election of 1921. In 1965, it agreed to become the official opposition party in the House of Commons. Retrieved 2010-04-18. "CAIN: Abstracts of Organisations - 'I'".

Holding the ground: The Nationalist party in Northern Ireland, 1945–72. The Northern Ireland Social Democratic and Labour Party: Political opposition in a divided society. McAllister, I. (1977). CrossRefGoogle Scholar. (2004). The Armalite and the ballot box’: Sinn Fein’s electoral strategy in Northern Ireland. Electoral Studies, 23(1), 123–142. McEldowney, . Anderson, . & Shuttleworth, I. (2011). Sectarian demography: Dubious discourses of ethno-national conflict.

Lynn, Brendan (1997). lt;templatestyles src "Module:Citation/CS1/styles. php?title 1945 in Northern Ireland&oldid 5425837". Categories: Use dmy dates from February 2012.

18 Lynn, Brendan, Holding the ground: the Nationalist Party in Northern Ireland, 1945–1972 (Aldershot, 1997);Eamon, Phoenix, Northern nationalism: nationalist politics, partition and the Catholic minority in Northern Ireland, 1890–1940 (Belfast, 1994);Staunton, Enda.

18 Lynn, Brendan, Holding the ground: the Nationalist Party in Northern Ireland, 1945–1972 (Aldershot, 1997);Eamon, Phoenix, Northern nationalism: nationalist politics, partition and the Catholic minority in Northern Ireland, 1890–1940 (Belfast, 1994);Staunton, Enda, The nationalists of Northern Ireland,, 1918–1973 (Dublin, 2001). 19 Mulholland, Marc, Northern Ireland at the crossroads: Ulster Unionism in the O’Neill years, 1960–9 (Basingstoke, 2000), p. 133. 20 Murray and Tonge, Sinn Féin and the .

Brendan Lynn, Holding the Ground: The Nationalist Party in Northern Ireland, 1945 - 72 (1997) . The crash killed all eleven occupants, however no one on the ground was killed or injured.

Brendan Lynn, Holding the Ground: The Nationalist Party in Northern Ireland, 1945 - 72 (1997), ISBN 1-85521-980-8. Biographies of Members of the Northern Ireland House of Commons. The cause of the crash was never ascertained. Omagh came into the international focus of the media on 15 August 1998, when the Real Irish Republican Army exploded a car bomb in the town centre.

In spite of the fact that for almost fifty years the Nationalist Party was regarded as the main representative of the minority community in Northern Ireland little detailed research has ever been carried out on the party. The only major work so far completed on the subject has been that done by Dr Eamon Phoenix in his most recent work, Northern Nationalism: Nationalist Politics, Partition and the Catholic Minority in Northern Ireland 1890-1940 (Ulster Historical Foundation, Belfast, 1994). This book is therefore an attempt to look at the events and developments which were to affect the party in the period from the end of the Second World War up until the rise of the civil rights movement in the 1960s. What one discovers is a political grouping, made up of various individuals, trying to provide constitutional opposition in circumstances where it has no prospect of securing power, either to force any movement on the constitutional question, or to compel the authorities at Stormont to introduce a reform package capable of satisfying the alleged grievances of Northern Catholics. The 1960s were to bring rising expectations from this group and ultimately the party was to pay the price for failing to provide it with the leadership it demanded.