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by Kai Bird

Download The Color of Truth: McGeorge Bundy and William Bundy: Brothers in Arms eBook
ISBN:
0684856441
Author:
Kai Bird
Category:
Politics & Government
Language:
English
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster; 1st Printing edition (June 21, 2000)
Pages:
496 pages
EPUB book:
1361 kb
FB2 book:
1678 kb
DJVU:
1787 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
557


Grey is the color of truth. So observed Mac Bundy in defending America's intervention in Vietnam. Kai Bird brilliantly captures this ambiguity in his revelatory look at Bundy and his brother William.

Grey is the color of truth.

The Color of Truth book. Kai Bird brilliantly captures this ambiguity in his revelatory look at Bundy and his brother William, two of the most influential policymakers of the Kennedy and Johnson administrations

The Color of Truth book. Grey is the color of truth. So observed Mac Bundy in defending. Kai Bird brilliantly captures this ambiguity in his revelatory look at Bundy and his brother William, two of the most influential policymakers of the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. It is a portrait of fiercely patriotic, brilliant and brazenly self-confident men who "Grey is the color of truth.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Color of Truth : McGeorge and .

Contents Introduction 1 Harvey Hollister Bundy: The Patriarch 2 Groton: A Very Expensive Education 3 Yale: The "Great Blue Mother" 4 The War Years, 1941-1945 5 Stimson's Scribe 6 Portrait of a Young Policy Intellectual, 1948-1953 7 Dean Bundy of Harvard, 1953-1960 8 William Bundy and the CIA, 1951-1960 9 The Kennedy Years 10 The Cuban Missile Crisis.

McGeorge Bundy attended the private Dexter Lower School in Brookline, Massachusetts and the elite Groton School, where he. .Bird, Kai. The Color of Truth: McGeorge and William Bundy, Brothers in Arms: A Biography. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1998.

McGeorge Bundy attended the private Dexter Lower School in Brookline, Massachusetts and the elite Groton School, where he placed first in his class and ran the student newspaper and debating society. Biographer David Halberstam writes: He attended Groton, the greatest "Prep" school in the nation, where the American upper class sends its sons to instill the classic values: discipline, honor, a belief in the existing values and the rightness of them.

Kai Bird, the author of The Chairman, the acclaimed biography of John J. McCloy, brilliantly recreates the world of Boston Brahmin privilege in which the Bundy brothers were reared to govern

Kai Bird, the author of The Chairman, the acclaimed biography of John J. McCloy, brilliantly recreates the world of Boston Brahmin privilege in which the Bundy brothers were reared to govern. Educated at Groton, Yale and Harvard, Mac and Bill Bundy were protégés of Henry Stimson, Dean Acheson and Justice Felix Frankfurter, and their friends and admirers included Walter Lippmann, Joseph Alsop and J. Robert Oppenheimer. The Color of Truth is the definitive biography of McGeorge Bundy and William Bundy, two of "the best and the brightest" who advised presidents about peace and war during the most dangerous years of the Cold War. Kai Bird brilliantly captures this ambiguity in his revelatory look at Bundy and his brother William, two of the most influential policymakers of the Kennedy and Johnson administrations

Grey is the color of truth. It is a portrait of fiercely patriotic, brilliant and brazenly self-confident men who directed a steady escalation of a war they did not believe could be won.

Published June 21, 2000 by Simon & Schuster. NO MAN CASTS a longer shadow over the American Century than Henry Lewis Stimson.

McGeorge ("Mac") Bundy attained fame as a Harvard dean, a White House aide, a foundation president, and a writer. Both found much anguish in their encounters with Vietnam. Their stories are each. MORE BY Philip Zelikow. The Color of Truth: McGeorge Bundy and William Bundy: Brothers in Arms.

The Color of Truth is a book by Kai Bird, published by Touchstone Books in June 2000.

"Grey is the color of truth." So observed Mac Bundy in defending America's intervention in Vietnam. Kai Bird brilliantly captures this ambiguity in his revelatory look at Bundy and his brother William, two of the most influential policymakers of the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. It is a portrait of fiercely patriotic, brilliant and brazenly self-confident men who directed a steady escalation of a war they did not believe could be won. Bird draws on seven years of research, nearly one hundred interviews, and scores of still-classified top secret documents in a masterful reevaluation of America's actions throughout the Cold War and Vietnam.
  • Kerahuginn
The one star is for the quality of this published edition, not the writing. The text itself, by Kai Bird, is an excellent piece of writing. I checked it out of the library some years ago and read an original hardback copy. I wanted to own a copy of the book for a number of reasons, so I bought this paperback re-issue. Unfortunately, it is a poor publication as is happening so often these days with books that I think are simply scanned from the original hardback. The type is small, the paper quality is weak. But, most disappointing is the photo reproduction of 16 pages of very valuable and historic photos. They were clearly scanned from the original hardback. There was no effort to reproduce the original photos, which is the only way you get a quality print. If you know anything about scanning of photos printed in books and newspapers, the weave of the original paper ruins the scan of the photo.

It was so clear to me that the print quality of this Touchstone paperback was inferior to the hardback I had read years ago, I decided to search for a used copy of the original. I had paid $27.00 for this paperback, and I found a used original edition hardback at Alibris for 99 cents plus shipping. When it arrived I was pleased to see that my memory of the original hardback publication was correct. The used hardback was in excellent condition, the paper quality was superb, the print was a readable size, and the pictures were larger, clearer and crisp with very good definition.

So, skip the $27.00 for this paperback and try to find an earlier edition hardback for much less. Only if the consumers speak up about this inferior glut of paperback reproductions will the publishers quit producing them. Amazon offers a lot, but if this paperback had been sitting on a shelf at Barnes and Noble, I would have leafed through it immediately and seen the poor quality. Now, can I figure out how to return this book?
  • Lemana
This is "The Best and Brightest" focused on the Bundy brothers. Essential reading for the history of how foreign policy was made prior to Dr. K and Dick Nixon. Suffers from being written before major documents were declassified in the 1990's and later.
  • Pettalo
This book is an excellent read. The fact the two brothers accomplished so much in service to their country is fascinating.
  • I ℓ٥ﻻ ﻉ√٥υ
An excellent look at the lives of two of America's most gifted public servants. For anyone interested in how our government operates at the highest level, this is a must read.
  • Wanenai
Beautifully written
  • Milleynti
Without hesitation I've put this book on my short list of recommendations for anyone who wants to learn more about the Vietnam War. Not at the top simply because it assumes some prior knowledge about many of the players involved and the historical events described but it should be included, (I think), with books by Halberstam, Sheehan, etc.

Why? The Bundy brothers were at the center of most if not all the policy and military decisions concerning Vietnam made during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations - McGeorge as Special Assistant to the President on National Security Affairs to both JFK and LBJ - William working under McNamara, (Defense) and then Dean Rusk, (State). This book/author does an excellent job of putting these decisions in the context of the Bundy brothers' background, upbringing, education, intellect, loyalty and sense of duty, i.e. all the things a biography should do.

Will the reader agree with all the decisions the Bundys made? ...Of course not. In fact one may disagree with every decision each or both of them did make but this book gives the reader an appreciation or at least an understanding as to how and why they came about. (As an aside, most of the questions/doubts concerning Vietnam policy made in hindsight, were raised contemporaneously by one or both of the Bundys -just another piece to this enigmatic puzzle.)

Regarding the book's perspective/objectivity, I have no complaints and found the author admirably evenhanded - Although there are some anecdotes concerning peripheral individuals, (i.e. Henry Kissinger), which do not show them in the most positive light and may even raise a smirk from the reader.

Finally although this review has centered on the Bundys and Vietnam this book chronicles much more, both before and after the Vietnam War - Henry Stimson, military service, the CIA, McCarthyism and the Cold War, Harvard and Yale, Cuba, the Ford Foundation - but in the interest of brevity I hope I've made my point.
  • Kieel
THE COLOR OF TRUTH: MCGEORGE BUNDY AND WILLIAM BUNDY, BROTHERS IN ARMS: A BIOGRAPHY is essential reading for anyone trying to understand American foreign policy in the twentieth century. This book is well-researched and full of previously-undisclosed information. It also provides two portraits of what "establishment liberalism" was, how it developed, and its consequences. In the process, some of the most fascinating moments in American history are illuminated, most of the time unfavorably.
From their respective military careers in WWII to their numerous positions in academia, government, and the non-profit sector, these two brothers were at the center of a huge web of personal and professional contacts in the American establishment. They were in many ways, the best, but also very flawed. This biography reveals those flaws, and the consequences of their failures.
This book is very dense, especially during the sections dealing with the question of Vietnam, and an acquaintance with the brothers' own corpus of work is helpful and increases the potency of the book's analytical edge. It should be required reading for anyone interested in government policy, because it reveals how decisions are made, and how human beings think.