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Download Anchors against Change: American Opinion Leaders' Beliefs After the Cold War eBook

by Kathleen Shoon Murray

Download Anchors against Change: American Opinion Leaders' Beliefs After the Cold War eBook
ISBN:
0472107585
Author:
Kathleen Shoon Murray
Category:
Politics & Government
Language:
English
Publisher:
University of Michigan Press; 1st edition (December 11, 1996)
Pages:
224 pages
EPUB book:
1832 kb
FB2 book:
1301 kb
DJVU:
1167 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
120


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book by Shoon Kathleen Murray. The end of the Cold War also ended the organizing paradigm of American foreign policy since World War II, containment of Communism .

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Rosenau, The Post-Cold War Foreign Policy Beliefs of American Leaders: Persistence or Abatement of Partisan Cleav-ages?, in Eugene R. Wittkopf, e. The Future of American Foreign Policy, 2nd ed (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1994); also relevant is Shoon Kathleen Murray, Anchors Against Change: American Opinion Leaders’ Beliefs After the Cold War (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan. More-over, American commitment to ghting the war if necessary solidied nearly a year and a half before Pearl Harbor, and American military actions in the fall of 1941 constituted undeclared warfare.

Murray, Shoon Kathleen (1996) Anchors Against Change: American Opinion Leaders' Beliefs After the Cold War. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. Do People Need Foreign Enemies?

Murray, Shoon Kathleen (1996) Anchors Against Change: American Opinion Leaders' Beliefs After the Cold War. Do People Need Foreign Enemies? American Leaders' Beliefs after the Soviet Demise. Murray, Shoon Kathleen and Jason Meyers (1999) Do People Need Foreign Enemies? American Leaders' Beliefs after the Soviet Demise, The Journal of Conflict Resolution, vol. 43, no. 5, pp. 555-69. Theory of International Politics.

Shoon Murray is Associate Professor of International Service at American University, US.

Shoon Murray is Associate Professor of International Service at American University, USA. She served as Director of the . Foreign Policy Master's program at SIS from 2008 to 2014. Her other books include Anchors Against Change: American Opinion Leaders' Beliefs After the Cold War (1997) and Mission Creep: The Militarization of US Foreign Policy (2014). Show all. Table of contents (5 chapters).

Shoon Kathleen Murray was born in 1961. Find and Load Ebook Anchors against Change

Shoon Kathleen Murray was born in 1961. Download more by: Shoon Kathleen Murray. Find and Load Ebook Anchors against Change.

Murray, Shoon Kathleen

Murray, Shoon Kathleen. Anchors against Change: American Opinion Leaders’ Beliefs after the Cold War. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1996. Rathbun, Brian . Joshua D. Kertzer, Jason Reifler, Paul Goren, and Thomas J. Scotto.

The Cold War experience clearly conditioned the United States response to these atrocities. Instead of targeted military strikes and global police cooperation, which would have been the most sensible reaction, the Bush administration chose this moment of unchallenged global hegemony to lash out and occupy Afghanistan and Iraq. It acted because its people were understandably angry and fearful. And it acted because it could. The Bush version was directed by foreign policy advisers who thought of the world predominantly in Cold War terms; they stressed power projection, territorial control and regime change.

The end of the Cold War also ended the organizing paradigm of American foreign policy since World War II, containment of Communism. How the attitudes towards American involvement abroad of opinion leaders were affected by the collapse of the Soviet Union is critical in predicting the shape of future American foreign policy. Shoon Murray investigates how American leaders' foreign policy opinions changed once they revised their views about the Soviet Union and explores what this tells us about the sources and structure of their belief system.The end of the Cold War provides a rare opportunity to explore the causal connection between external circumstances and Americans' belief systems. While it is true that, for Americans, the denouement of the Cold War was a peaceful process, and therefore less shocking and traumatic than some past wars, the event still marked an enormous change within the international environment. If Americans' perceptions about the former Soviet Union did in fact dictate many other foreign policy beliefs then we could expect deep attitudinal change to accompany the end of the Cold War.Murray argues that the upheavals in the international system had only limited effect on the foreign policy beliefs of American leaders and that opinion leaders have adhered to their old postures about how the United States should conduct itself in the world. Murray explains this continuity by finding a strong relationship between the domestic beliefs of leaders and their orientation toward American activities abroad. Domestic political orientation was a stronger influence on the elite's attitude toward foreign policy than the elite's image of the Soviet Union. Murray suggests that elite political actors apply the same or kindred values to circumstances at home and abroad.This book will appeal to social scientists interested in studying elite opinion as well as students of the foreign policy process and those interested in the formation of American foreign policy in the post cold war era.Shoon Kathleen Murray is Assistant Professor of Political Science, School of International Service, American University, Washington, D.C.