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Download Fat Man Fed Up: How American Politics Went Bad eBook

by Jack W. Germond

Download Fat Man Fed Up: How American Politics Went Bad eBook
ISBN:
0812970926
Author:
Jack W. Germond
Category:
Politics & Government
Language:
English
Publisher:
Random House Trade Paperbacks (July 12, 2005)
Pages:
256 pages
EPUB book:
1614 kb
FB2 book:
1967 kb
DJVU:
1798 kb
Other formats
txt mbr mobi lrf
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
821


Fat Man Fed Up: How American Politics Went Bad. by. Jack W. Germond. For more than forty years, Jack Germond has been covering politics for Gannett newspapers, the Washington Star, and the Baltimore Sun, and talking politics on the Today show, The McLaughlin Group, and Inside Washington.

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Now, in Fat Man Fed Up," " Germond confronts the most critical issues raised by our election process and offers a scathing but wry polemic about what s wrong with American politics.

Now, in Fat Man Fed Up," " Germond confronts the most critical issues raised by our election process and offers a scathing but wry polemic about what s wrong with American politics.

Fat Man Fed Up is a bracing look at how we never seem to get the truth about the people we're electing. Jack Germond has over 40 years experience in covering politics, from the city level right through Presidential campaigns

Fat Man Fed Up is a bracing look at how we never seem to get the truth about the people we're electing. Jack Germond has over 40 years experience in covering politics, from the city level right through Presidential campaigns. He's seen it all: the boozers, the philanderers, the corrupt, the ignorant, the ideologue, and the idealist. He uses that experience to demonstrate how our political system has gotten to the point where people care more about hairstyles and superficial symbols over real substance and constructive debate.

FAT Man fed up. How American Politics Went Ba. Germond (Fat Man in a Middle Seat, 1999) blends Andy Rooney and . How American Politics Went Bad. by Jack W.

FAT MAN FED UP: HOW AMERICAN POLITICS WENT BAD Jack W. Germond Random House, 224 pages Jack Germond is a fat man. But he makes up for it by being short. He is not Mr. Five-by-Five, though he comes close. More importantly, Mr. Germond is, or rather was, one of the nation's better political reporters and columnists. Although he is now what one might call semi-retired, he still dabbles in television, writes an occasional op-ed piece, and now and then a book. His first four books were co-authored with fellow columnist Jules Witcover.

Now, in Fat Man Fed Up, Germond confronts the most critical issues raised by our election process and offers a scathing but wry polemic about what’s wrong with American politics

Now, in Fat Man Fed Up, Germond confronts the most critical issues raised by our election process and offers a scathing but wry polemic about what’s wrong with American politics. Is there any connection between what happens in campaigns and what happens in government? And if not, where does the blame for the discontent lie? Was Tocqueville right? Do we get the leaders we deserve? Indeed, according to Germond, the politicians aren’t the only ones to blame, or even the chief culprits.

Jack W. Germond; Jules Witcover (1985). Fat Man Fed Up: How American Politics Went Bad. Random House Trade Paperbacks. Wake Us When It's Over: Presidential Politics of 1984. Simon & Schuster. Retrieved August 25, 2013. Mad As Hell: Revolt at the Ballot Box 1992, Warner Books (1992). Fat Man in a Middle Seat: Forty Years of Covering Politics. ISBN 978-0-8129-7092-0.

Jack Worthen Germond, American journalist. Kiplinger award for distinguished contributions to journalism, National Press. 00987/?tag prabook0b-20. Mad As Hell: Revolt at the Ballot Box, 1992. Now, in Fat Man Fed Up, Germond confronts the most critical issues raised by our election process and offers a scathing but wry polemic about what’s wrong with American politics. Is there any connection between what happens in campaigns and what happens in government? And if not, where does the blame for the discontent lie?

Jack W. Germond (Germond, Jack . used books, rare books and new books. Fat Man Fed Up: How American Politics Went Bad: ISBN 9780812970920 (978-0-8129-7092-0) Softcover, Random House Trade Paperbacks, 2005. Find all books by 'Jack W. Germond' and compare prices Find signed collectible books by 'Jack W. Germond'. Blue Smoke and Mirrors. by Jules Witcover, Jack W. Fat Man Fed Up: How American Politics Went Bad: ISBN 9781400061549 (978-1-4000-6154-9) Hardcover, Random House, 2004.

For more than forty years, Jack Germond has been covering politics for Gannett newspapers, the Washington Star, and the Baltimore Sun, and talking politics on the Today show, The McLaughlin Group, and Inside Washington. Now, in Fat Man Fed Up, Germond confronts the most critical issues raised by our election process and offers a scathing but wry polemic about what’s wrong with American politics.Is there any connection between what happens in campaigns and what happens in government? And if not, where does the blame for the discontent lie? Was Tocqueville right? Do we get the leaders we deserve? Indeed, according to Germond, the politicians aren’t the only ones to blame, or even the chief culprits. He describes how he and his colleagues in the news media have been guilty of dumbing-down the political process–and how the voters are too apathetic to demand better coverage and better results. Instead, they simply turn away and too often end up enduring third-rate presidents.This no-sacred-cows manifesto faces the problems many are reluctant to address:• Polls and how they are used and abused by politicians and press to mislead gullible voters.• The critical failure of the press to accurately portray figures in the political realm, from Eugene McCarthy to Barbara Bush to Al Sharpton.• How the complaints about liberal bias in the press miss the real point: whether that bias, if it exists, colors the way editors and reporters work.• The staggering influence of television, and the networks’ inability to provide anything but the most simplistic coverage of politics.• The “big lie” school of campaigning. From “Where’s the beef?” to “compassionate conservatism,” the politics of empty slogans has always placed noise above nuance: Say anything loudly enough and long enough, and voters are bound to mistake it for the truth.Along the way, Germond illustrates his arguments by drawing from his war chest of priceless anecdotes from decades in the business. With his inimitable combination of incisive journalism and sardonic and witty straight talk, Germond guides us through the fog created by candidates and the media. In this timely, outrageous, and compulsively readable book, no one is let off the hook. Fat Man Fed Up is a bracing look at how we never seem to get the truth about the people we’re electing.From the Hardcover edition.
  • Cargahibe
On the other hand, if you've read Germond's earlier book, you'll find this pretty much a re-run. Don't get me wrong: I think Germond was a god. And his "Fat Man in A Middle Seat" is pure gold. But this book pretty much mines the same material, only viewing it from a different gauge: how politics went to hell.
If you've read neither, I'd recommend "Middle Seat," but you probably can't go wrong with either. But once you've read one, the other will sound like your uncle telling his great stories over again; they're great, but not nearly so much when you've already heard them.
  • Lynnak
Jack Germond has over 40 years experience in covering politics, from the city level right through Presidential campaigns. He's seen it all: the boozers, the philanderers, the corrupt, the ignorant, the ideologue, and the idealist. He uses that experience to demonstrate how our political system has gotten to the point where people care more about hairstyles and superficial symbols over real substance and constructive debate. Sometimes, the stories are pretty funny, but generally, this is a depressing and unforgiving look at both print and (especially) television "journalism" and how they are used by the two major parties to keep out any potential competitors, and to keep the complicated issues we face simplified beyond resolution into sound bites. I sincerely doubt that the anonymous reviewer(s) from D.C. actually read the book, as no specific examples of their complaint are offered for examination. Germond has almost always acted as the force of moderation, with a degree of what used to be called "horse sense" sorely lacking in so many of today's columnists and anchors. His stories span the once-wider stretches of our political spectrum and the now-forgotten civility between the parties, and I can't blame him for decrying how spin, never-ending campaigns, and millions upon millions of campaign dollars have either discouraged the average voter or created voting blocks incapable of independant thought. I can't imagine a better way to spend an evening or two reading this and imagining sitting with Jack over a steak and a couple of martinis, wistfully reminiscing over what promise our country held, and wondering desperately how we can get back on track. A great read, highly recommended.
  • Early Waffle
Germond is concerned that the political process, especially in national elections, has become increasingly dysfunctional over the last forty years with the result that marginal candidates (empty suits) are elected. The book is not really a scathing indictment of the process or of individuals. Through the use of personal experiences as a political reporter, the author gently criticizes the trends and results of the political process.

The author identifies nothing that would be a surprise to anyone with even a minimal interest in politics: mindless and informationless campaigns; the ascendancy of television and visuals; nitpicking and "gothcha" journalism; empty and evasive notions of objectivity and fairness; ill-conceived and distorting polling; etc. What is unique about the book is the author's ability to flesh out these developments with personal anecdotes. He bemoans the fact that journalists and politicians, as a rule, no longer can have close relationships. Without the element of trust, it becomes less likely that a reporter can penetrate campaign propaganda. Voters are hardly given a free pass; ultimately it is they who must make the process work.

With the exception of a concern, briefly mentioned, of the importance of money in political campaigns, the author has little to say about the growing dominance of corporate and financial interests in the country as a whole and in the political process. One would have expected, especially since the author is a liberal, some comment on the rise of such issues as free trade, outsourcing, privatization, deregulation, the massive decline of labor, tax cut mania, etc and their minimal and inept questioning by the media and lack of salience in elections. He does decry the rise of the religious right and its role in the installation of a patently unqualified individual in the White House.

The Fat Man is fed up, it seems, mostly because of the loss of collegiality and standards of conduct among political operatives of all kinds. However, there are millions of people in this country way more fed up than the author with the rightward, fundamentalist, pro-business turn in economic and political affairs that threaten to undermine the American way of life that has been carefully fought for and constructed over many decades. The author is not optimistic that a remedy is at hand, as it likewise undoubtedly seems to the many others disgusted with the path that the country is following.
  • Gandree
Conservative's are the thinest skin people on earth, but the thick headedness also.The analogy in another review's comments about M. Moore "misrepresenting history" Yet, didn't Mr. Moore offer $10,000.00 if anybody could prove facts wrong or twisted!--9/11, Point is if you don't see issues in the vary same light as they do then your all these wonderful things they attribute to people who see's things differently, your, ignorant,dishonest,biased to a fault,muckrackers,etc,etc,etc.

So the 1 star reviews are some of these very people they are---"People who when faced with the choice of changing one's mind or proving there's no need to do so, usually get busy on the "proof". THerefore their reviews are useless.
  • Abuseyourdna
with out a doubt jack germond see's politics as it is..just a game of power.i'm a true fan of his.