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Download Opium Regimes: China, Britain, and Japan, 1839-1952 eBook

by Bob Tadashi Wakabayashi,Timothy Brook

Download Opium Regimes: China, Britain, and Japan, 1839-1952 eBook
ISBN:
0520220099
Author:
Bob Tadashi Wakabayashi,Timothy Brook
Category:
Politics & Government
Language:
English
Publisher:
University of California Press (August 7, 2000)
Pages:
456 pages
EPUB book:
1941 kb
FB2 book:
1175 kb
DJVU:
1777 kb
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
821


Of course the primary writer for Japan was Bob Tadashi Wakabayashi, and the majority of the book was about China, but given the circumstances that can be forgiven.

Of course the primary writer for Japan was Bob Tadashi Wakabayashi, and the majority of the book was about China, but given the circumstances that can be forgiven. The opium trade beginning with British Imperial interests and then Japanese Imperial interests are covered in this book. It also covers the effects and how the Chinese government finally dealt with the aftermath of wide-spread addiction. Wakabayashi's coverage of the Japan and its avoidance, and their eventual use of opium for imperial gain is extremely interesting. The information about China's addiction through the British and the changes in China thanks to opium was also interesting.

Opium Regimes: China, Britain, and Japan, 1839–1952. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000. The History of Imperial China (6 vols). Cambridge: Harvard University Press (2008-) Awards. The prize is one of the Lukas Prize Project awards. The book was described as a "bold, original and compulsively readable work of history.

This book argues, and in large measure demonstrates, that for China opium was a very large variable indeed. Opium lubricated Western penetration into Asia, especially for the British, and helped significantly to pay for the upkeep and administration of Western colonies there. It was the casus belli that opened imperial China's treaty ports and became the metaphor for the falling dynasty's weakness and disgrace. It was the cash crop that lifted millions of Chinese peasants to new prosperity, and that exposed them to heightened levels of scrutiny and harassment by the state.

In 1907 Great Britain signed a treaty agreeing to gradually eliminate opium exports to China over the next decade . Brook, Timothy; Wakabayashi, Bob Tadashi (2000). Opium Regimes: China, Britain, and Japan, 1839–1952. University of California Press.

In 1907 Great Britain signed a treaty agreeing to gradually eliminate opium exports to China over the next decade while China agreed to eliminate domestic production over that period. Estimates of domestic production fell from 35,000 metric tons (34,000 long tons) in 1906 to 4,000 metric tons (3,900 long tons) in 1911.

Associate Professor of History Timothy Brook, Timothy Brook, Bob Tadashi Wakabayashi. University of California Press, 18 сент.

Home Browse Books Book details, Opium Regimes: China, Britain, and Japan . By Timothy Brook, Bob Tadashi Wakabayashi.

Home Browse Books Book details, Opium Regimes: China, Britain, and Japan,. Opium Regimes: China, Britain, and Japan, 1839-1952.

Opium is more than just a drug extracted from poppies. Over the past two centuries it has been a palliative medicine, an addictive substance, a powerful mechanism for concentrating and transferring wealth and power between nations, and the anchor for a now vanished sociocultural world in and around China. Opium Regimes integrates the pioneering research of sixteen scholars to show that the opium trade was not purely a British operation but involved Chinese merchants, Chinese state agents, and Japanese imperialists as well. The book presents a coherent historical arc that moves from British imperialism in the nineteenth century, to Chinese capital formation and state making at the turn of the century, to Japanese imperialism through the 1930s and 1940s, and finally to the apparent resolution of China's opium problem in the early 1950s.Together these essays show that the complex interweaving of commodity trading, addiction, and state intervention in opium's history refigured the historical face of East Asia more profoundly than any other commodity.