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Download Re-imagining Child Protection: Towards Humane Social Work with Families eBook

by Brid Featherstone,Sue White,Kate Morris

Download Re-imagining Child Protection: Towards Humane Social Work with Families eBook
ISBN:
1447308018
Author:
Brid Featherstone,Sue White,Kate Morris
Category:
Politics & Government
Language:
English
Publisher:
Policy Press (May 15, 2014)
Pages:
256 pages
EPUB book:
1593 kb
FB2 book:
1767 kb
DJVU:
1687 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
114


Article in Child & Family Social Work 19(4) · November 2014 with 38 Reads. How we measure 'reads'.

Article in Child & Family Social Work 19(4) · November 2014 with 38 Reads. 118+ million publications.

Kate Morris is Associate Professor of Social Work at the University of Nottingham and studies family minded practices in child protection. Customers who bought this item also bought. Page 1 of 1 Start overPage 1 of 1.

Re-Imagining Child Protection: Towards Humane Social Work with Families. Brid Featherstone, Sue White and Kate Morris, Bristol, Policy Press, 2014, 192 pp. ISBN 9781447308010. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. Affiliation: Social Work. Files in This Item: File.

This chapter examines the ways in which families with complex needs have been understood and represented in policy discourses, and the implications for social work with families where there are care and protection needs. Family-minded practice has struggled to receive sustained attention in social work, and yet the notion of family as the context for the resolution of children’s needs extends the scope for supporting change and provides an accurate reflection of children’s lived experiences.

Re-Imagining Child Protection : Towards Humane Social Work with Families. Raising a number of critical questions, Brid Featherstone, Susan White and Kate Morris challenge a child protection culture that they see as becoming increasingly authoritarian

Re-Imagining Child Protection : Towards Humane Social Work with Families. by Kate Morris, Susan White, Brid Featherstone. Raising a number of critical questions, Brid Featherstone, Susan White and Kate Morris challenge a child protection culture that they see as becoming increasingly authoritarian. Calling for a family-minded practice of child protection, they argue that children should be understood as relational beings and that greater sensitivity should be paid to parents and the needs they have as a result of the burdens of childcare.

Social Work Child Abuse Child Welfare Child Protection Child Protective Service. Featherstone, Brid, Sue White, and Kate Morris. Re-imagining Child Protection: Towards Humane Social Work with Families. Bristol: Policy Press. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Sue White is Professor of Social Work (Children and Families) at the .

In ‘Re-imagining Child Protection: Towards humane social work with families’, which will be published on 14. .

In ‘Re-imagining Child Protection: Towards humane social work with families’, which will be published on 14 April, the authors challenge the ways in which child-protection operates, particularly in relation to more deprived families. The book is the collective effort of experts in the field of child protection across three universities: Kate Morris a Professor in Social Work from The University of Nottingham, Brid Featherstone, from the Open University and Susan White, from The University of Birmingham. Challenging child protection culture.

Re-imagining Child Protection: Towards Humane Social Work with Families (Paperback). Brid Featherstone, Sue White and Kate Morris. Brid Featherstone (author), Susan White (author), Kate Morris (author). It calls for family-minded humane practice where children are understood as relational beings, parents are recognized as people with needs and hopes and families as carrying extraordinary capacities for care and protection.

Raising a number of critical questions, Brid Featherstone, Susan White and Kate Morris challenge a child protection culture that they see as becoming increasingly authoritarian. Calling for a family-minded practice of child protection, they argue that children should be understood as relational beings and that greater sensitivity should be paid to parents and the needs they have as a result of the burdens of childcare. They argue that current child protection services need to ameliorate, rather than reinforce, the many deprivations that parents engaged in their systems face. Bringing together authors who combine a wealth of experience in both scholarship and practice, this book provides a sensitive reassessment of a critical point of contact between governments and families.