almediah.fr
» » The Myth of American Diplomacy: National Identity and U.S. Foreign Policy

Download The Myth of American Diplomacy: National Identity and U.S. Foreign Policy eBook

by Walter L. Hixson

Download The Myth of American Diplomacy: National Identity and U.S. Foreign Policy eBook
ISBN:
0300119127
Author:
Walter L. Hixson
Category:
Politics & Government
Language:
English
Publisher:
Yale University Press; 1st US Edition 1st Printing edition (March 3, 2008)
Pages:
392 pages
EPUB book:
1854 kb
FB2 book:
1581 kb
DJVU:
1523 kb
Other formats
azw docx doc mbr
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
141


Walter L. Hixson is professor of history at the University of Akron This myth of American identity provides a space for the support of militant foreign policy.

Walter L. Hixson is professor of history at the University of Akron. He has published numerous books and articles on the history of . foreign policy, including the prize-winning book George F. Kennan: Cold War Iconoclast. This myth of American identity provides a space for the support of militant foreign policy. As can be seen throughout American history, external aggression helps promote internal unity. This external aggression need not be outside of the country as can be seen during times throughout our history the minorities within the country have provided a group to unify against.

Start by marking The Myth of American Diplomacy: National Identity . foreign policy as a manifestation of the nation's powerful hegemonic, manly, and "enemy-othering" identity.

Start by marking The Myth of American Diplomacy: National Identity and . Foreign Policy as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. From its inception requiring genocide of Native Americans, to its current unjust policies in the Middle East, Hixson criticizes the tendency of the United States to dominate, "civilize" and wage war over diplomacy.

yale university press new haven & london. This book may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, including illustrations, in any form

yale university press new haven & london. This book may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, including illustrations, in any form. beyond that copying permitted by Sections 107 and 108 of the . Designed by James J. Johnson and set in Minion Roman by The Composing Room of Michigan, Inc. Printed in the United States of America by Sheridan Books, In. Ann Arbor, Michigan.

The Myth of American Diplomacyshows the deep connections between American foreign policy and the domestic culture from which it springs

The Myth of American Diplomacyshows the deep connections between American foreign policy and the domestic culture from which it springs. Hixson investigates the national narratives that help to explain ethnic cleansing of Indians, nineteenth-century imperial thrusts in Mexico and the Philippines, the two World Wars, the Cold War, the Iraq War, and today's war on terror. He examines the discourses within America that have continuously inspired what he calls our "pathologically violent foreign policy

In this major reconceptualization of the history of .

In this major reconceptualization of the history of . foreign policy, Walter Hixson engages with the entire sweep of that history, from its Puritan beginnings to the twenty-first century's war on terror.

Published by: Yale University Press. The Myth of American Diplomacyshows the deep connections between American foreign policy and the domestic culture from which it springs. With Myth of America identity buoyed by victory in Europe and Asia, the United States demanded universal acceptance of its providential mission to shepherd the Free World.

As this myth has supported violence, violence in turn has supported the myth. In this major reconceptualization of the history of . The Myth of American Diplomacy shows the deep connections between American foreign policy and the domestic culture from which it springs. foreign policy, Walter Hixson engages with the entire sweep of that history, from its Puritan beginnings to the twenty-first century’s war on terror.

foreign policy would probably be more effective if Americans were less convinced of their own unique virtues and less eager to proclaim them. What we need, in short, is a more realistic and critical assessment of America’s true character and contributions. In that spirit, I offer here the Top 5 Myths about American Exceptionalism. Moreover, as Godfrey Hodgson recently noted in his sympathetic but clear-eyed book, The Myth of American Exceptionalism, the spread of liberal ideals is a global phenomenon with roots in the Enlightenment, and European philosophers and political leaders did much to advance the democratic ideal.

Home . Details for: The Myth of American Diplomacy . Details for: The Myth of American Diplomacy : Normal view MARC view ISBD view. The Myth of American Diplomacy : National Identity and . Foreign Policy, Walter L. Hixson.

Hixson applies to American history the findings of settler colonial studies as a global intellectual endeavor. His most recent book is The Myth of American Diplomacy: National Identity and . Foreign Policy (2009). There is no other work out there like this, and this kind of synthesis is much needed.

In this major reconceptualization of the history of U.S. foreign policy, Walter Hixson engages with the entire sweep of that history, from its Puritan beginnings to the twenty-first century’s war on terror. He contends that a mythical national identity, which includes the notion of American moral superiority and the duty to protect all of humanity, has had remarkable continuity through the centuries, repeatedly propelling America into war against an endless series of external enemies. As this myth has supported violence, violence in turn has supported the myth.

 

The Myth of American Diplomacy shows the deep connections between American foreign policy and the domestic culture from which it springs. Hixson investigates the national narratives that help to explain ethnic cleansing of Indians, nineteenth-century imperial thrusts in Mexico and the Philippines, the two World Wars, the Cold War, the Iraq War, and today’s war on terror. He examines the discourses within America that have continuously inspired what he calls our “pathologically violent foreign policy.” The presumption that, as an exceptionally virtuous nation, the United States possesses a special right to exert power only encourages violence, Hixson concludes, and he suggests some fruitful ways to redirect foreign policy toward a more just and peaceful world.

 

  • Qwne
Well researched; extensive bibliography; a truly scholarly work. If you ever wanted to know why "they" hate us -- trust me, it is NOT because of our freedom -- this book; and "Confessions Of An Economic Hit Man" pretty much tell it all. Not preachy, or heavy philosophy; just a lot of facts that are conveniently left out of what passes for "news" and education in the USA.
  • Ochach
In The Myth of American Diplomacy Walter Hixson presents important historical material in a way that forces the reader to think outside of the box. Hixson's main argument is that "US foreign policy, bolstered by a usable past, encompasses a vast realm of representation and linguistic discourse that has served to create, affirm, and maintain cultural hegemony" (p. 9). In other words, it is our view of American history that has provided us with a means to constantly reaffirm our national identity. This national identity is especially important to Americans because as a nation we lack the long history of the European countries. Since we do not have a long term past to root our sense of identity in, we must constantly find ways to assure ourselves of our identity distinct from others.

Hixson argues that this usable past is the root of foreign policy. Americans constantly engage in rituals that reinforce the myth of our identity, such as singing "God Bless America" and celebrating national holidays such as Memorial Day and Thanksgiving. However, the most efficient and powerful way to reaffirm our national identity is through choosing war and violent action. This myth of American identity provides a space for the support of militant foreign policy. As can be seen throughout American history, external aggression helps promote internal unity. This external aggression need not be outside of the country as can be seen during times throughout our history the minorities within the country have provided a group to unify against. At times of extreme change or challenges to the idea of American identity militant foreign policy has provided a relief to the anxiety felt.

While Hixson's book may be seen as an attack on America, this only shows the great extent to which we as Americans have internalized the myth he discusses. The analysis of well-known episodes throughout American history and how they exhibit the greater ideas found in American national identity, expand the traditional history that Americans have been taught. Although the book discusses topics which are complex and require some deeper consideration, Hixson's inclusion of appendices that explain the theory used in the text are extremely valuable and help to make the book very readable. As a high school teacher, this book was very useful to me. Public schools, which are given standards by the government that they must meet, are perhaps one of the greatest perpetuators of the myth of American diplomacy. By expanding perspectives on the topic this book has helped to expand the manner in which I address such topics with my students.
  • Mushicage
In "The Myth of American Diplomacy," Walter Hixson argues that since the 17th century, Americans have internalized the "Myth," which includes concepts of American exceptionalism, racial superiority, patriarchy, and so on. The consumption of this Myth leads to domestic tensions that periodically percolate up to a breaking point, which causes us to essentially go abroad and seek monsters to destroy in order to reinforce national unity. For Hixson, every conflict in American history happens in the same way, through a regular cycle of violence spurred on by the Myth. His analysis is centered entirely on cultural explanations of foreign policy, and he owes a great deal to Antonio Gramsci, Michel Foucault, and other post-modernists. The reader is left wondering if things like national security or politics had any influence whatsoever. Of course, Hixson would argue that I would argue that, as I have so internalized the myth that I can't break out from it. Maybe, but I don't think so. Whatever the case, the construction of his thesis precludes criticism, as all can be disregarded in such a way. As a synthesis of revisionist scholarship and cultural theory, the book is of some use. In parts, his work can be insightful, if also wholly unoriginal. The narrative that Hixson constructs is unfortunately unsatisfying. Indeed, that is probably an understatement. He regularly misrepresents the historical record in order to fit the work into his impossibly rigid narrative. He suggests that there was an American national identity much earlier than any such thing actually existed, and further suggests that such an identity has been unchanged over the past several hundred years. The book becomes repetitive in theme and language--his use of theoretical buzzwords is only overshadowed in annoyance by his attempt to create new ones (also, try counting how many times he says "myriad"). Normally, I would not trivialize the work so, but this borders on the silly. For instance, he often proposes renaming events that he thinks have been characterized as too innocuous, like the War of 1812. For some reason he is not satisfied by the implications of such a term. The last chapter is so blatantly presentist and polemical that he should be ashamed. As far as I can tell, this book has been reviewed quite a bit, but often negatively. This is probably accurate. There are much better books that speak from his political position (try Andrew Bacevich), and much better revisionist literature (LaFeber, or even still WA Williams). I doubt that this book will be influential once the novelty of its provocative language fails. It is clearly suggested throughout that all of world history since the settlement of this continent by Europeans has hinged upon American identity, and all that has resulted has been bad. This is certainly exaggerated. What is perhaps most frustrating after all the ranting and raving is the solution that Hixson offers. Essentially, we should do something different. Good advice. Here is another bit: don't read this book.