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Download Unions in a Contrary World: The Future of the Australian Trade Union Movement (Reshaping Australian Institutions) eBook

by David Peetz

Download Unions in a Contrary World: The Future of the Australian Trade Union Movement (Reshaping Australian Institutions) eBook
ISBN:
0521639506
Author:
David Peetz
Category:
Politics & Government
Language:
English
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press (November 28, 1998)
Pages:
256 pages
EPUB book:
1633 kb
FB2 book:
1681 kb
DJVU:
1406 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
189


Unions in a Contrary World book. Australia once had extremely high levels of trade union participation yet since the 1970s the number of union members has been falling dramatically.

Unions in a Contrary World book. This book gives the clearest picture yet of why people do or do not belong to unions and, in a sophisticated way, examines the reasons for union decline.

Australia once had extremely high levels of trade union participation yet since the 1970s the number of union members has been falling dramatically.

Unions in a Contrary World. The Future of the Australian Trade Union Movement. Lee, Margaret and Peetz, David 1998. Recommend to librarian. Trade Unions and the Workplace Relations Act. Labour & Industry: a journal of the social and economic relations of work, Vol. 9, Issue. Unions in a Contrary World. Online ISBN: 9781139106818.

Unions in a contrary world: The future of the Australian trade union movement. R May, G Strachan, K Broadbent, D Peetz. Cambridge University Press, 1998. Brave new workplace: How individual contracts are changing our jobs. Allen & Unwin, 2006. The casual academic workforce and labour market segmentation in Australia. R May, D Peetz, G Strachan. Labour & Industry: a journal of the social and economic relations of work 2. 2013.

view the future of the movement in Québec City and elsewhere since the dismantling of the camp. Unions in a Contrary World: The Future of the Australian Trade Union Movement by David Peetz. January 2000 · Labour (Committee on Canadian Labour History). Article January 2003.

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Description: Australia once had extremely high levels of trade union participation yet since the 1970s the number of union members has been falling dramatically

Description: Australia once had extremely high levels of trade union participation yet since the 1970s the number of union members has been falling dramatically. This book gives the clearest picture vet of why people do or do not belong to unions and, in a sophisticated way, examines the reasons for union decline.

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In Unions in a Contrary World: The Future of the Australian Trade Union Movement, Peetz explores the state of trade unions and organized labor in Australia. Peetz "focuses on one of the most dramatic changes in Australian institutions over the past two decades-the fall in union density from a little over fifty percent in the mid-1970s to around thirty percent by the mid-1990s," noted Gillian Whitehouse in the Australian Journal of Political Science. Clearly, this is an issue worthy of detailed analysis-and this the book provides amply," Whitehouse remarked.

History of the Australian trade union movement. The first Australian unions were formed by free workers (non-convict labourers) in Sydney and Hobart in the late 1820s. Unions spread across the country from the late 1830s. Between 1850 and 1869 about 400 unions were formed in Australia. Many achievements were made by the trade union movement during the post-war era, including reduced work hours and equal pay. Unions also began addressing other social issues such as Indigenous rights, gender discrimination and migrant welfare.

Australia once had extremely high levels of trade union participation yet since the 1970s the number of union members has been falling dramatically. This book gives the clearest picture yet of why people do or do not belong to unions and, in a sophisticated way, examines the reasons for union decline. Uniquely, it considers both macro and micro levels, looking at the structure of the economy and the labor market, the ideological dispositions people have toward unionism, the role of the state and the political and industrial strategies of unions.