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Download So Close to the State/s: The Emergence of Canadian Feature Film Policy, 1952-1976 (Heritage) eBook

by Michael Dorland

Download So Close to the State/s: The Emergence of Canadian Feature Film Policy, 1952-1976 (Heritage) eBook
ISBN:
080208043X
Author:
Michael Dorland
Category:
Politics & Government
Language:
English
Publisher:
University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division (June 20, 1998)
Pages:
222 pages
EPUB book:
1620 kb
FB2 book:
1915 kb
DJVU:
1711 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
328


A major contribution to scholarship on Canadian cinema, So Close to the State/s provides a revealing look at the relationship between culture and the state.

This book examines in detail the formation of Canadian feature film policy from the 1950s to the present. It pays special attention to the role played by producers, filmmakers, and government agencies, in relation to the changing production practices brought about by Canadian television. For Canadian policy-makers, the feature film was considered to be a signifier of cultural modernity. A major contribution to scholarship on Canadian cinema, So Close to the State/s provides a revealing look at the relationship between culture and the state.

Examines the formation of feature film policy in the Canadian context of the 1950s through to the present, paying special attention to the role played by producers, filmmakers and government agencies. eISBN: 978-1-4426-8001-2. Subjects: Political Science. You are viewing the table of contents.

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Dorland, Michael (1998). So Close to the State/s: The Emergence of Canadian Feature Film Policy. University of Toronto Press. p. 44. ISBN 978-0-8020-8043-1.

Les brûlés was first broadcast on Radio-Canada on Fridays at 9 . starting 15 November 1957. The Promised Land adaptation was broadcast as half-hour episodes Sundays at 10:30 . Eastern) from 16 September to 7 October 1962 on CBC Television. Dorland, Michael (1998).

So Close to the States: The Emergence of Canadian Feature Film Policy, University of Toronto Press, 1998 .

This book, written by two Canadian political scientists, proposes a reassessment of the theories on. .

This book, written by two Canadian political scientists, proposes a reassessment of the theories on transition, and, by the same token, a new look at the societal dynamics of white settlers' colonies. Using colonial Quebec under British rule as their case study, the authors put forth an interpretive analysis which brings to light the fundamental social and economic processes that have shaped contemporary Quebec.

Many Canadian scholars tried to explain the mechanisms behind the repetitive failures of Canadian producers and .

Many Canadian scholars tried to explain the mechanisms behind the repetitive failures of Canadian producers and filmmakers in their ongoing struggle to maintain their own film industry. This essay looks back at the production of Puerto Rican films in the 1980s and 1990s as the point of departure for young Puerto Rican filmmakers in the first decades of the 21st century. Even as the stories of this newer generation differ, their concern with the island image and diasporic movement continue to question Puerto Rican identity. Problems of local film production and outside. distribution remain for each film project. Retrieved 26 April 2012. The Promised Land on IMDb. The Promised Land at the National Film Board of Canada. Allan, Blaine (1996). Saved in: Bibliographic Details. Main Author: Dorland, Michael.

So Close to the State(s). The Emergence of Canadian Feature Film Policy. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1998. The Testimonial Uncanny. Indigenous Storytelling, Knowledge and Reparative Practices. Albany: State University of New York, 2014. Gittings, Christopher. Canadian National Cinema: Ideology, Difference and Representation. London and New York: Routledge, 2002.

This book examines in detail the formation of Canadian feature film policy from the 1950s to the present. It pays special attention to the role played by producers, filmmakers, and government agencies, in relation to the changing production practices brought about by Canadian television.

For Canadian policy-makers, the feature film was considered to be a signifier of cultural modernity. Filmmakers' desire to experiment with a new format was subverted by a political-economic agenda intent on using the format to create cultural authenticity for a nation lagging behind its neighbour to the South. Dorland crafts a careful historical analysis based on primary sources, including government records and in-depth personal interviews with key participants. Employing Foucault's concept of governmentality, Dorland analyses the state's interest in influencing and shaping feature film production.

A major contribution to scholarship on Canadian cinema, So Close to the State/s provides a revealing look at the relationship between culture and the state.