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by Edward Friedman,Stacy Mosher,Jian Guo,Roderick MacFarquhar,Yang Jisheng

Download Tombstone: The Great Chinese Famine, 1958-1962 eBook
ISBN:
0374277931
Author:
Edward Friedman,Stacy Mosher,Jian Guo,Roderick MacFarquhar,Yang Jisheng
Category:
Politics & Government
Language:
English
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux; First Edition edition (October 30, 2012)
Pages:
656 pages
EPUB book:
1359 kb
FB2 book:
1133 kb
DJVU:
1627 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
704


It is like finding out my mother is a serial killer. I could not sleep for days, and cried through every page

If the cause of the Great Famine had been a natural disaster, this double standard might be more understandable. But the causes, as Yang Jisheng shows in meticulous detail, were political. It is like finding out my mother is a serial killer. I could not sleep for days, and cried through every page. But I know that as a Chinese person, I have a responsibility to read this book.

Chinese statistics are always overwhelming, so Yang helps us to. .The famine occurred neither during a war nor in a period of natural calamity

Chinese statistics are always overwhelming, so Yang helps us to conceptualize what 36 million deaths actually means. The famine occurred neither during a war nor in a period of natural calamity. Yang writes that one reason for the book’s title is to establish a memorial for the uncle who raised him like a son and starved to death in 1959.

This is the summary of Tombstone: The Great Chinese Famine . Jisheng, Edward Friedman, Stacy Mosher, Jian Guo, Roderick MacFarquhar.

This is the summary of Tombstone: The Great Chinese Famine, 1958-1962 by Yang Jisheng, Edward Friedman, Stacy Mosher, Jian Guo, Roderick MacFarquhar.

by Yang Jisheng & Edward Friedman & Stacy Mosher & Jian Guo & Roderick MacFarquhar. You have survived, EVERY SINGLE bad day so far. ― Anonymous. Oh Crap! Potty Training: Everything Modern Parents Need to Know.

Tombstone: The Great Chinese Famine 1958–1962. Guo Jian is Professor of English at the University of. Пользовательский отзыв - Book Verdict. Stacy Mosher learned Chinese in Hong Kong, where she lived for nearly 18 years.

New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2012. The Chinese Jews of Kaifeng: A Millennium of Adaptation and Endurance. ISBN 978-0-374-27793-2 Tombstone: The Great Chinese Famine, 1958–1962. by StacyMosher and GuoJian. pp. xx and 270. Lanham, Boulder, New York, London, Lexington Books, 2017. Volume 29 Issue 3 - Nancy Shatzman Steinhardt.

Professor Edward Friedman,Leroy B Williams Professor of History and Political Science and Professor of Government Roderick MacFarquhar.

item 1 Tombstone: The Great Chinese Famine, 1958-1962 by Jisheng, Yang Book The Cheap -Tombstone: The Great Chinese Famine, 1958-1962 by Jisheng, Yang Book The Cheap. item 2 Tombstone: The Great Chinese Famine, 1958-1962 by Jisheng, Yang Book The Cheap -Tombstone: The Great Chinese Famine, 1958-1962 by Jisheng, Yang Book The Cheap. Professor Edward Friedman,Leroy B Williams Professor of History and Political Science and Professor of Government Roderick MacFarquhar.

Corresponding author. Recommend this journal.

Yang, Jisheng,, Friedman, Edward,, Guo, Jian. 2012) Tombstone :the great Chinese famine, 1958-1962 New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux, MLA Citation. Yang, Jisheng,, Friedman, Edward,, Guo, Jian. Tombstone: The Great Chinese Famine, 1958-1962. New York : Farrar, Straus And Giroux, 2012. Main Author: Yang, Jisheng.

The much-anticipated definitive account of China's Great Famine

An estimated thirty-six million Chinese men, women, and children starved to death during China's Great Leap Forward in the late 1950s and early '60s. One of the greatest tragedies of the twentieth century, the famine is poorly understood, and in China is still euphemistically referred to as "the three years of natural disaster."

As a journalist with privileged access to official and unofficial sources, Yang Jisheng spent twenty years piecing together the events that led to mass nationwide starvation, including the death of his own father. Finding no natural causes, Yang attributes responsibility for the deaths to China's totalitarian system and the refusal of officials at every level to value human life over ideology and self-interest.

Tombstone is a testament to inhumanity and occasional heroism that pits collective memory against the historical amnesia imposed by those in power. Stunning in scale and arresting in its detailed account of the staggering human cost of this tragedy, Tombstone is written both as a memorial to the lives lost―an enduring tombstone in memory of the dead―and in hopeful anticipation of the final demise of the totalitarian system. Ian Johnson, writing in The New York Review of Books, called the Chinese edition of Tombstone "groundbreaking . . . One of the most important books to come out of China in recent years."

  • Coidor
I was born in Beijing in 1985, and lived there through 7th grade. Growing up in the 90's I often heard my elders refer to the "Three Years of Natural Disaster" as a period of hardship - all my family resided in Beijing and Shanghai, and they were deprived of food -but they were not starved (My grandma used to talk about buying crumbs of bread and saving the one egg she was able to find for my mother). My grandparents went through the labor reform camps and my parents were left at home to be looked after by good hearted neighbors and relatives. Not a easy life by any means, but no one in my family died from this "Three Years of Natural Disaster."

NEVER have I heard about cannibalism, mass starvation and the wiping out of entire families. Why? Because, I now realize, that all the people who died were people who lived in the poorest areas of the country, with no power to ask for anything. 45 million people died brutal, torturous deaths. There were villages where so many people died, that they had to quarantine the entire area so that news didn't get out. There was NO WAY for people who lived in the major cities to know the extent of suffering the rest of China went through. But what shocked me even more is that this was never a NATURAL disaster...there was nothing natural about any of it. In fact, the entire tragedy was brought on by a chain reaction composed of greed, oppression and cowardice. Politics, bureaucracy, and a power hungry totalitarian ruler were what caused this famine.

Okay, I don't want to go into much detail here because I am getting carried away...

This book is life changing for me, as a child of the new-generation China. I grew up in a westernized and prosperous Beijing, and even China from the 1970's was far removed from me. There is an assumption that my generation doesn't really care about what happened before, because we got in made - we're the first generation to fully experience the benefits and wealth brought on by Deng Xiaoping's policy to open up to the west. I had Coca-cola, I had Mcdonald's. I was an only child, and so were all my classmates, and we were all spoiled to bits. Perhaps it is because of our removal from that history of suffering that they think it is a good opportunity to bury the past, starting from us.

This book pulled back the curtains and revealed to me this gaping hole in my history book. It is like finding out my mother is a serial killer. I could not sleep for days, and cried through every page. But I know that as a Chinese person, I have a responsibility to read this book. To not read it would be like allowing this enormous lie to keep festering in me. I wish that every Chinese person could read this and know the truth. Too bad it is banned in China, and I doubt it would ever see the light of day.

I am not a political person, but I can't stand the thought of millions dying for no reason. They did die for no reason, though - a genocide on this scale is beyond all reason/justification - but the least we could do now is to KNOW about it. These were people who spoke my language, and celebrated the same holidays, and knew the same folklores. It just hits me so hard - I never thought there could be this deliberate, government induced mass extinction in the recent history of China, covered up so well. I thought I was fortunate to be born in a country that has never invaded anyone or started any wars. Turned out it was too busy killing off its own people.

Anyway, if you are like me - if you grew up in China and went to school there...I think you owe it to yourself to read this book. We've been lied to, we've been treated as unthinking, unfeeling fools with no conscience.... Don't let them do that to you anymore. If you have an opportunity to get this book, get it and read it. We have a right to know, and to lament for our own.
  • Prince Persie
Facts and figures, facts and figures, facts and figures. No real personal human interest stories, which seems strange since it chronicles the needless and early deaths of more than 35 million Chinese people due to Mao's evil policies. It shows what can happen when average people blindly follow an evil man, and how even good ideas can be corrupted by simple people put in charge of their peers with no training and no accountability. My wife is a survivor of that time, being born in China in 1958. This book does help me understand why she is always hungry, grows a huge garden, is always preparing food, and gets frantic if a meal is an hour late; food is the most important thing in her life. None of us, not even the poorest of the poor, in the U.S. can comprehend what tens of millions of Chinese suffered in the late 1950's and 1960's. I wish the author would have used the help of a professional writer to make an easier read, but it is none the less an important historical book.
  • Thetahuginn
Yang's book is a very thorough exhaustive and exhausting history of the Great Chinese Famine that was the direct result of the Great Leap Forward. In wondering how 36 million people died of starvation (with an estimated 76 million total decline in potential population due to a dramatically curtailed birth rate along with the unnatural death rate), this book details policies, politicians' and civilians' actions that all contributed to this disaster. This book is thoroughly researched and documented, One of the most important aspects of this book that made me want to read it and continue reading it is that it is based upon Chinese archival material and through eyewitness accounts. Yang's book is nothing short of overwhelming though. His account details the inhumanity starvation caused as society broke down during these years. The barbaric behavior of so many is presented again and again through actions such as widespread cannibalism, corruption, ambivalence, deception, and ignorance. Therein lies the problem though. Yang has so much material in this book that the accounts he presents seem to reoccur endlessly in the book. The fact that this single volume was condensed from the ordinal publication in two volumes is stunning since I cannot imagine reading two volumes of this. This one volume was more than enough for me. Yang presents an enormous amount of data, but his descriptions of that data is mind-numbingly dull at times. This book is probably best appreciated by experienced historians and scholars of modern China. This book will help any serious student of contemporary China to understand the emergence of the modern state of the People's Republic of China as it left behind a horrific tragedy.
  • Xtintisha
As a Russian History major moving to China I thought I would research Chinese history for a project to occupy my time. As I ploughed through VOLUMES of materials I began learning things I had not heard of before, and drawing some very different conclusions than the Chinese history readily available. I was frustrated wondering WHY so much mis-information has been so wide spread? Then I read Tombstone. This book not only confirmed my personal conclusions, but helped me in my frustration because it shines a spotlight on the shadowy pile of rubbish that has been passing as historically accurate accounting.
Every high school should teach this book. Truth far beyond clarifying this portion of historic tragedy is embedded in the writing.