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Download Women and Slavery, Vol. 2: The Modern Atlantic eBook

by Gwyn Campbell,Joseph C. Miller,Suzanne Miers

Download Women and Slavery, Vol. 2: The Modern Atlantic eBook
ISBN:
0821417266
Author:
Gwyn Campbell,Joseph C. Miller,Suzanne Miers
Category:
Social Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
Ohio University Press; 1 edition (December 14, 2007)
Pages:
312 pages
EPUB book:
1707 kb
FB2 book:
1136 kb
DJVU:
1932 kb
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
564


Nicely, (Women and Slavery, Vol. 2) reads as a conversation―among people who disagree―about the 'second . The two volumes challenge us to reconsider women and slavery and appreciate the strongly gendered nature of servitude in world history.

Nicely, (Women and Slavery, Vol. 2) reads as a conversation―among people who disagree―about the 'second sex' and slaver. .― University of Toronto Quarterly.

Joseph C. Miller is the T. Cary Johnson, Jr. Professor of history at the University of Virginia

Only 9 left in stock (more on the way). Suzanne Miers is professor emerita of history at Ohio University. Joseph C. Professor of history at the University of Virginia. He is the author of Kings and Kinsmen, Way of Death, and works on the world history of slavery.

Gwyn Campbell, Suzanne Miers, Joseph Calder Miller.

In particular, mounted warfare, the use of horse-riders in military operations, revolutionized war as it spread to different parts of Eurasia and Africa during the Ancient and Medieval eras, and to the Americas during the Early Modern period.

Volume 2 Contributors Henrice Altink Laurence Brown Myriam Cottias Laura F. Edwards Richard Follett Tara Inniss Barbara Krauthamer Joseph C. Miller Bernard Moitt Kenneth Morgan Claire Robertson Marsha Robinson Felipe Smith Mariza de Carvalho Soares.

Women and Slavery, volume 2: The Modern Atlantic. Athens, OH: Ohio University Press, 2008.

Hawthorne, Walter, 2008. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

What is modern slavery and what forms of slavery exist today? .

What is modern slavery and what forms of slavery exist today? Find out where modern slavery happens, the numbers behind it and who is affected. Whether they are women forced into prostitution, men forced to work in agriculture or construction, children in sweatshops or girls forced to marry older men, their lives are controlled by their exploiters, they no longer have a free choice and they have to do as they’re told. There are estimated 4. million people in modern slavery around the world. 2. million people in forced labour.

Colleen A. Vasconcellos. Published: 1 January 2013. in The Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth. The Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth, Volume 6, pp 396-398; doi:10. The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.

Women and Slavery, with Gwyn Campbell and Suzanne Miers, Athens OH: Ohio University Press, 2008, ISBN 978-0-8214-1723-2.

In an article shortly before his death, he described his scholarship as stemming from. Women and Slavery, with Gwyn Campbell and Suzanne Miers, Athens OH: Ohio University Press, 2008, ISBN 978-0-8214-1723-2.

The literature on women enslaved around the world has grown rapidly in the last ten years, evidencing strong interest in the subject across a range of academic disciplines. Until Women and Slavery, no single collection has focused on female slaves who—as these two volumes reveal—probably constituted the considerable majority of those enslaved in Africa, Asia, and Europe over several millennia and who accounted for a greater proportion of the enslaved in the Americas than is customarily acknowledged.Women enslaved in the Americas came to bear highly gendered reputations among whites—as “scheming Jezebels,” ample and devoted “mammies,” or suffering victims of white male brutality and sexual abuse—that revealed more about the psychology of enslaving than about the courage and creativity of the women enslaved. These strong images of modern New World slavery contrast with the equally expressive virtual invisibility of the women enslaved in the Old—concealed in harems, represented to meddling colonial rulers as “wives” and “nieces,” taken into African families and kin-groups in subtlely nuanced fashion.Volume 2 Contributors: Henrice Altin,k Laurence Brown, Myriam Cottias, Laura F. Edwards, Richard Follett, Tara Inniss, Barbara Krauthamer, Joseph C. Miller, Bernard Moitt, Kenneth Morgan, Claire Robertson, Marsha Robinson, Felipe Smith, and Mariza de Carvalho Soares.