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by C.L.R James

Download Mariners, Renegades and Castaways eBook
ISBN:
0850315743
Author:
C.L.R James
Category:
Social Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
Allison & Busby 1985-04 (1985)
EPUB book:
1689 kb
FB2 book:
1938 kb
DJVU:
1765 kb
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
980


Mariners Renegades and Castaways book.

Mariners Renegades and Castaways book. Political theorist and cultural critic, novelist and cricket enthusiast, C. L. R. James (1901 - 1989) was a brilliant polymath who has been described by Edward Said as a centrally important 20th-century figure.

The publication of Mariners, Renegades and Castaways by the University Press of New England this . James's analysis of Moby Dick brings the book to life and makes it understandable for a 21st century audience

The publication of Mariners, Renegades and Castaways by the University Press of New England this summer - the first time the book has been printed in complete form in nearly 50 years - is simply the latest evidence of a major James revival now under way. James's¨ posthumous popularity makes sense. James's analysis of Moby Dick brings the book to life and makes it understandable for a 21st century audience. You'll read "Mariners, Renegades, and Castaways, and want to immediately run out and read Moby Dick and Melville's other classics.

CLR James was one of the earliest left wing thinkers to break from Orthodox Marxist dogmatism, even rejecting .

CLR James was one of the earliest left wing thinkers to break from Orthodox Marxist dogmatism, even rejecting Leninism and the notion of the 'Vanguard of the Proletariat' all the way back in the late '40's, a move that left him alienated from the mainstream Left of the time and eventually led to his deportation in the 1950s.

These mariners, renegades, and castaways come from all corners of the earth, James writes, living as the vast majority . In 1952, the US government detained Trinidadian socialist C. James on Ellis Island for four months

These mariners, renegades, and castaways come from all corners of the earth, James writes, living as the vast majority of human beings live. seeking to avoid pain and misery and struggling for happiness. Above them all sits Captain Ahab, the chief executive who wields centuries of accumulated knowledge and labor for his own gain, but who - not unlike Donald Trump and his circle - would blindly throw all of it into the abyss. James on Ellis Island for four months. The official reason was that James threatened the morals of the people of the United States.

Mariners renegades and castaways. The story of Herman Melville and the world we live in. by C L R. James. Published 1978 by Bewick/Ed. There's no description for this book yet.

Bibliographic Details. Publisher: C. James, NY. Publication Date: 1953. Used, Antiquarian and Rare Books bought and sold. Visit Seller's Storefront. Members of these associations are committed to maintaining the highest standards. They vouch for the authenticity of all items offered for sale

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Mariners, Renegades and Castaways: The Story of. .

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Mariners, Renegades and Castaways: The Story of Herman Melville and the World We Live in by . Born in Trinidad in 1901, C. James moved to England in 1932 where he was a leading Marxist theorist, a founder of the Pan-African movement, cricket correspondent for the Manchester Guardian, and author of numerous books, including the influential history of the Haitian slave rebellion, The Black Jacobins (1938).

On that score, ''Mariners, Renegades and Castaways'' is something of a puzzle. 'It's very, very big news in the James world that the book is being published,'' said Jim Murray, the founding director of the C. James Institute in Manhattan

On that score, ''Mariners, Renegades and Castaways'' is something of a puzzle. James wasn't the first to find cold war imagery in ''Moby-Dick''; other scholars had begun to contrast Ahab, as a symbol of Stalinist totalitarianism, with Ishmael, the democratic American and the voyage's only survivor. James's twist was to argue that the totalitarianism was not simply a foreign threat. James Institute in Manhattan. 'It's the book of his that's been most in demand in the last 20 years, but no one has had i. ' Advertisement.

The book would show how the party's strategies could be used to build a.Mariners, Renegades and Castaways: The Story of Herman Melville and the World We Live In. New York: privately printed (1953).

The book would show how the party's strategies could be used to build a new African future Archives  . Reissued, London: Allison & Busby (1984).

Political theorist and cultural critic, novelist and cricket enthusiast, C. L. R. James (1901 - 1989) was a brilliant polymath who has been described by Edward Said as "a centrally important 20th-century figure." Through such landmark works as The Black Jacobins, Beyond a Boundary, and American Civilization, James's thought continues to influence and inspire scholars in a wide variety of fields. "There is little doubt," wrote novelist Caryl Phillips in The New Republic, "that James will come to be regarded as the outstanding Caribbean mind of the twentieth century." In his seminal work of literary and cultural criticism, Mariners, Renegades and Castaways, James anticipated many of the concerns and ideas that have shaped the contemporary fields of American and Postcolonial Studies, yet this widely influential book has been unavailable in its complete form since its original publication in 1953. A provocative study of Moby Dick in which James challenged the prevailing Americanist interpretation that opposed a "totalitarian" Ahab and a "democratic, American" Ishmael, he offered instead a vision of a factory-like Pequod whose "captain of industry" leads the "mariners, renegades and castaways" of its crew to their doom. In addition to demonstrating how such an interpretation supported the emerging US national security state, James also related the narrative of Moby Dick, and its resonance in American literary and political culture, to his own persecuted position at the height (or the depth) of the Truman/McCarthy era. It is precisely this personal, deeply original material that was excised from the only subsequent edition. With a new introduction by Donald E. Pease that places the work in its critical and cultural context, Mariners, Renegades and Castaways is once again available in its complete form.
  • Pemand
CLR James was one of the earliest left wing thinkers to break from Orthodox Marxist dogmatism, even rejecting Leninism and the notion of the 'Vanguard of the Proletariat' all the way back in the late '40's, a move that left him alienated from the mainstream Left of the time and eventually led to his deportation in the 1950s. This book was written while he was in jail in New York awaiting his immigration hearing, a fact that makes this insightful look at Melville all the more impressive.

James points out that Melville was a visionary who caught glimpses of new social types long before they became prevalent in society: he even makes the startling statement that Melville is the ONLY author of Industrial capitalism. Reading first this book, then going back and reading Moby Dick, I must say that I cannot argue with his assessment. I found this small volume challenging, engaging and at times, personally upsetting, as I read something of myself and many others like me in James' reading of Ishmael. Definite cause for pause and reflection.

This book ends with a chapter describing in excruciating detail James' treatment while in jail, which I found at first quite self serving and gripey...but upon further reflection, his story is irritating because it is a banal and everyday litany of life under bureaucratic capitalism, not pretty or interesting, but it got under my skin, like the rest of this book.

If you like Melville or are interested in anti-authoritarian left thinking, you could do no better than to pick this up: I couldn't put it down.
  • AfinaS
There's something to be said for being a monomaniacal critic, which is what James is in this book - what's on his mind is totalitarianism and how to oppose it, and that lets him see things in _Moby-Dick_ that I myself, scholar and professor that I am, hadn't seen. It also leads him to ignore things in the novel that are important, and to distort things; but the gain outweighs the loss.
  • Yggfyn
gift. no knowledge of product effectiveness or quality
  • Ƀ⁞₳⁞Ð Ƀ⁞Ǿ⁞Ɏ
This book is more than a little bit of early Postcolonial writing. The intoduction by Donald Pease is new, and the last chapter - an autobiographical sketch and personal appeal by James - was omitted from a previous edition. In terms of literary criticism, this is what Pease has to say about James and his writing: "He was one of the few critics who emerged from the Third World in the 1950's and traveled throughout Britain and the United States generating what are now called post-colonial readings." The real value of this book however is in its brilliant reinterpretation of MOBY DICK.
Rather than see Ahab and Ishmael as representing respectively "totalitarian" and "American" cultural themes as critics in the 1950's saw it, James offers a vison focused on the Pequod and its crew. A view in which the MARINERS, RENEGADES & CASTAWAYS of the ship were at the mercy of their Captain. In James' interpretaion the Pequod is a factory ship and the crew are the workers. Ahab is no longer a mere sailor but is now illustrative of a "Captain of industry."
I agree with the reviewer from New Haven regarding the peculiar situation James found himself in. The established interpretation of a Cold War allegory was in keeping with the times in the 1950's. If James or Melville himself were writing today, the interpretation on offer here - rather than something to be persecuted for - would be considered far more plausible than the narrow and blinkered view of the 1950's mainstream critics.
  • Jozrone
James, writing 100 years after _Moby Dick_ was published, shows a significant understanding of Herman Melville's time and its relation to the time in which he (James) wrote--1952. James gives an insightful critique of Melville's earlier novels and shows how they chronologically lead to Melville's eventual masterpiece, _Moby Dick_. _Moby Dick_ is an allegory for modernity gone awry, with a mad captain at the helm. For James, Ahab is comparable to the USA, which is charting its own mad course with destiny. In 1952 James was right on target, for he was detained on Ellis Island and eventually deported during the worst days of McCarthyism. It is a peculiar instance of a Trinidadian intellectual's desire to become a US citizen, and instead, being figuratively slapped in the face because of his associations with--through his writings against-- Russian communism and Trotskyites. That he wrote this book while being detained, and included an autobiographical chapter at the end makes this text quite a resource for literary critics as well as for those interested in learning about a historical case of US immigration policy in action.
  • Cherry The Countess
C.L.R. James's analysis of Moby Dick brings the book to life and makes it understandable for a 21st century audience. You'll read "Mariners, Renegades, and Castaways, and want to immediately run out and read Moby Dick and Melville's other classics. James argues that Melville used the novel to explore dramatic changes in the fabric of American culture including the rise of industrial capitalism, the international working class, and the increasingly savage character of political and industrial life and leadership.
C.L.R. James wrote this book while he was interned with the newest generation of "Mariners, Renegades, and Castaways" on Ellis Island awaiting deportation. James's fate--that of a foreigner who offers the finest existing interpretation of one of America's greatest books and is still deported--serves as a cautionary tale for our own times. James concludes, "What the writing of this book has taught the writer is the inseparability of great literature and of social life."