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Download Age and Employment: Why Employers Should Think Again About Older Workers eBook

by Richard Worsley

Download Age and Employment: Why Employers Should Think Again About Older Workers eBook
ISBN:
0862422043
Author:
Richard Worsley
Category:
Social Sciences
Language:
English
Publisher:
Age Concern Books (May 1, 1996)
Pages:
176 pages
EPUB book:
1169 kb
FB2 book:
1416 kb
DJVU:
1529 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
600


Below are a few myths about older workers which most people have but .

Below are a few myths about older workers which most people have but are not true. Myth 1: Older workers are lazy, and they hate to communicate with junior supervisors. Sometimes thinking out of the box is a good thing indeed, but other times, companies do want their employees in a particular and set way so that there are some similarity and uniformity in the quality of work which is delivered by the employees. 3. The will not be able to use modern technology well

Several employees change their jobs or career due to many factors, without being influenced by matters related with money extend time to think their strategies and also influence the employees to rethink their decisions. The relationship between an employee and an employer is changed even when the employee accepts a counter offer from that employer.

National institutions and employers’ age management practices in Britain and Germany: ‘Path dependence’ and option exploration.

Educational Gerontology, Vol. 37, Issue. Organisations cannot ignore these age dynamics, but should adopt ‘age aware’ rather than ‘age free’ practices. The recommended human-resources approach would attend to individuals' capabilities and not stereotype them by age. Export citation Request permission. National institutions and employers’ age management practices in Britain and Germany: ‘Path dependence’ and option exploration. Human Relations, Vol. 64, Issue.

Hannon, 55, says employers may have legitimate concerns about older . Workers older than age 50 may be more loyal. They also may have advanced critical-thinking skills that can help them make good decisions quickly.

Hannon, 55, says employers may have legitimate concerns about older workers being behind the curve when it comes to technology, but those skills can be taught. On the other hand, no amount of training can give a younger worker the wisdom gained through 20 or 30 years spent in the field. 2. Older workers have confidence. This may be particularly true for new hires who are grateful for the job. In general, older workers love their jobs more than younger ones, Hannon says.

The thing about older workers is that they tend to truly want to work for the sake of working, as opposed to younger . Nonetheless, employers often discriminate against older candidates, holding a bias because of their age.

The thing about older workers is that they tend to truly want to work for the sake of working, as opposed to younger workers who need to work to support themselves. Many of these older workers could retire and have enough money to sustain themselves, but they still want contribute to the world and engage with other people. Employers may be averse to managing employees who have more experience, and risk losing status and control if they are younger than the job candidate.

Older workers perform worse than younger ones in tests of working . That raises the second question: do employers want older workers, whatever their abilities?

However, declines in such capabilities are not crucial for most jobs, especially as physically strenuous ones become the exception in a service-based economy. That raises the second question: do employers want older workers, whatever their abilities?

Among older workers surveyed by AARP, not getting hired is the most common type of age discrimination .

Among older workers surveyed by AARP, not getting hired is the most common type of age discrimination they experienced, with 19 percent of respondents citing it. An additional 12 percent say they missed out on a promotion because of age, and 8 percent say they were laid off or fired. If you think you've been discriminated against, you can file a charge with the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). You can also work with a lawyer to file a lawsuit

3. They take more time off sick. Older workers are also at lower risk of accidents in the workplace, but suffer from more fatal accidents. This averages out to be a similar amount of sickness time taken for all employees. So employers should recognise that a worker employed with lots of experience – even at 64 – could easily stay with the organisation for many more years. When someone joins a company at 24, there is no stronger guarantee that they will stay any longer, due to the quite modern practice of regularly switching jobs.

THESIS STATEMENT ) Firstly, employers should hire young workers because they are fresh and energetic. ARGUMENT 1) Apart from the advantage of age, young employees are flexible, ready to learn and are generally more enthusiastic about their work in the hope of gaining experience while vying for promotion. Given the opportunity to put their ideas into practice, they would contribute towards the productivity of the company. TERM Winter '13. TAGS Young Workers.